Letters

Letters 09-07-2015

DEJA VUE Traverse City faces the same question as faced by Ann Arbor Township several years ago. A builder wanted to construct a 250-student Montessori school on 7.78 acres. The land was zoned for suburban residential use. The proposed school building was permissible as a “conditional use.”

The Court Overreached Believe it or not, everyone who disagrees with the court’s ruling on gay marriage isn’t a hateful bigot. Some of us believe the Supreme Court simply usurped the rule of law by legislating from the bench...

Some Diversity, Huh? Either I’ve been misled or misinformed about the greater Traverse City area. I thought that everyone there was so ‘all inclusive’ and open to other peoples’ opinions and, though one may disagree with said person, that person was entitled to their opinion(s)...

Defending Good People I was deeply saddened to read Colleen Smith’s letter [in Aug. 24 issue] regarding her boycott of the State Theater. I know both Derek and Brandon personally and cannot begin to understand how someone could express such contempt for them...

Not Fascinating I really don’t understand how you can name Jada Johnson a fascinating person by being a hunter. There are thousands of hunters all over the world, shooting by gun and also by arrow; why is she so special? All the other people listed were amazing...

Back to Mayberry A phrase that is often used to describe the amiable qualities that make Traverse City a great place to live is “small-town charm,” conjuring images of life in 1940s small-town America. Where everyone in Mayberry greets each other by name, job descriptions are simple enough for Sarah Palin to understand, and milk is delivered to your door...

Don’t Be Threatened The August 31 issue had 10 letters(!) blasting a recent writer for her stance on gay marriage and the State Theatre. That is overkill. Ms. Smith has a right to her opinion, a right to comment in an open forum such as Northern Express...

Treat The Sickness Thank you to Grant Parsons for the editorial exposing the uglier residual of the criminalizing of drug use. Clean now, I struggled with addiction for a good portion of my adult life. I’ve never sold drugs or committed a violent crime, but I’ve been arrested, jailed, and eventually imprisoned. This did nothing but perpetuate shame, alienation, loss and continued use...

About A Girl -- Not Consider your audience, Thomas Kachadurian (“About A Girl” column). Preachy opinion pieces don’t change people’s minds. Example: “My view on abortion changed…It might be time for the rest of the country to catch up.” Opinion pieces work best when engaging the reader, not directing the reader...

Disappointed I am disappointed with the tone of many of the August 31 responses to Colleen Smith’s Letter to the Editor from the previous week. I do not hold Ms. Smith’s opinion; however, if we live in a diverse community, by definition, people will hold different views, value different things, look and act different from one another...

Free Will To Love I want to start off by saying I love Northern Express. It is well written, unbiased and always a pleasure to read. I am sorry I missed last month’s article referred to in the Aug. 24 letter titled, “No More State Theater.”

Home · Articles · News · Features · Ironworkers Festival Stays...
. . . .

Ironworkers Festival Stays Strong

A drive over the Mackinac Bridge is enough to give anyone the heebie-jeebies.

Kristi Kates - August 4th, 2014  

But in the days before safety harnesses and aerial lifts, hundreds of men climbed to the top of the towering iron columns to piece the iconic structure together.

The grueling and dangerous tasks – which continue today – unite the ironworkers as a real band of brothers. So it’s no surprise that they celebrate their achievements at an annual festival each year.

HOOKED ON IRON

Tim Roman, the current president of the Ironworkers’ volunteer committee, was drawn to the Mackinaw City area as a 20-year-old.

“I was impressionable,” said Roman, who attended his first festival in 2000. “I was fortunate to be on a crew doing a major project on the Mackinac Bridge … I was immediately hooked on what was happening.”

Roman made the effort to return to the festival for years to follow, and in 2007 he accepted a job representing ironworkers in the U.P.

“It was pretty natural from that point forward to be involved with the festival and keep the fire burning,” said Roman, who is now president of the fest.

It’s a job that has its own share of highs and lows.

“Coordinating the volunteers, along with the skilled events, are the most rewarding part of all the efforts,” he said. “In the off-time, fundraising and seeking vendors is the big task.”

CLIMBING UP

This year’s Ironworkers Festival marks the 31st consecutive year for the event.

“It all started with some iron workers hanging out a couple climbs up a column, and a race evolved out of it,” Roman said. “The competition and camaraderie that took place was compelling enough to draw those ironworkers back a second year, and so on it goes growing.”

The column climb showcases the physical demands and perils in iron working, Roman said. It is both the competitor and crowd favorite.

“In days prior to safety harnesses and aerial lifts, climbing a column or riding the headache ball [a steel ballast on a crane] were the only ways to access the steel being erected,” he said. “If you wanted to be an ironworker, you had to be able to get to where the work was at.”

BUILDING AMERICA

In addition to the column climb, there’s the spud throw (long, pointed-end wrenches called “spud wrenches”), rod tying (in which pliers are used to tie specific knots around steel rods), and the rivet toss, an homage to the time when structural beams were secured into place using hot steel rivets (the ones at the fest are kept cold for safety reasons.)

Other activities include a parade, live music, and of course refreshments. While Roman says it’s impossible for him to choose a favorite event, one of his favorite festival elements is the strong sense of fraternity among the ironworkers.

“Both the competitors and the crowds cheer on everyone who participates,” he said. “The sportsmanship is great to be around.”

In Roman’s estimation, the festival has been growing so much in popularity that it’s pretty close to outgrowing its grounds in Mackinaw City.

“This event brings together the men and women who do these tasks on a daily basis,” he said. “It gives us an opportunity to showcase our craft, and to showcase what it takes physically and mentally to ‘build America.’”

This year’s International Ironworkers Festival will be held Aug. 8-10 in Mackinaw City. For more information, visit them on Facebook.

 
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