Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Homecoming Pow Wow Celebrates...
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Homecoming Pow Wow Celebrates Veterans

23 years of bringing Odawa culture closer to the community

Kristi Kates - August 11th, 2014  


Every year, the Odawa people--along with members of other Indian nations and their non-Native neighbors--gather to honor their own at the Odawa Homecoming Pow Wow. This year, a new layer of meaning will be added to the celebration as the Odawa pay respects to all veterans and warriors, enhancing the event that brings northern Michigan’s unique cultures closer together.

HISTORY AND HOPE

This year’s theme of “Honoring Our Veterans and Warriors” is “just one way that the Pow Wow Committee hopes to honor all veterans for their service and dedication,” says Festival Chair Annette VanDeCar. A Veterans Dance Special will ask all veterans, Native and non-Native, to participate in the ritual, and a token of appreciation will be given to these brave men and women after the dance.

VanDeCar enjoys the Pow Wow every year and credits this to its role as a strong reaffirmation of the tribe’s rich history. In a country that doesn’t always remember to honor our Native Americans, the Pow Wows are an important reminder of America’s first residents, and how preserving their history is a necessity.

CULTURE AND TRADITIONS

The Pow Wow itself comes from rich 20th century traditions. From the 1930s to the 1960s, Indian Naming Ceremonies and Hiawatha pageants were regular events and served as precursors, of sorts, to the Pow Wow of today, said VanDeCar.

“The Naming Ceremonies were held to honor those who helped Native people and their causes,” she explained. “At these ceremonies, non-Native people were ‘adopted’ into the tribe and given Indian names. After the end of the naming, a yearly production of the play Hiawatha was performed by Native people in the area.”

The events continued to expand into the 90s, and in 1992, the First Annual Odawa was held at the Ottawa Stadium in Harbor Springs. The Pow Wow is now a yearly festival held at the Little Traverse Bay Band Pow Wow Grounds on Pleasantview Road in Harbor Springs. This year, the August 9 and 10 festival provides a continuing opportunity for Native people to preserve and share their culture and traditions with each other and with the community at large.

COLORS AND CUISINE

The Pow Wow is a delicious feast for the senses with brilliant colors, embroidery, feathers, and beading embellishing the Native regalia (the formal term for the dancer’s clothing.) Rich smells of native foods scent the air, and the atmosphere is alive with music, the sound of drumbeats, and the sharing of stories and Native lore. Dance and drum competitions showcase the considerable talent shared by young and old alike and provide a wonderful access point for all visitors.

“Some of the songs sung by the drum groups are very old and are passed down from generation to generation,” VanDeCar said, “and the dance styles have been performed by dancers for centuries.”

VanDeCar points out that anyone can participate in many of the activities, whether they are Native American or just wish to learn more about this vibrant culture.

“I would encourage the public to participate in an intertribal dance,” she suggested. “Intertribal dances are a chance for everyone to dance regardless of whether they are in regalia or not, and anyone can participate, which brings the community together.”

VanDeCar also suggests that the public try some of the Native cuisine for sale at the event.

A typical menu might be fry bread, Indian tacos, blanket dogs, buffalo and hamburgers on fry bread, corn soup and hominy soup, as well as other Native foods.

“What I look forward to is our community getting together to continue our culture, our traditions, and our language,” VanDeCar said. “These are the things that make us unique as Odawa.”

The 23rd Annual Odawa Homecoming Pow Wow will take place August 9-10 at the LTBB Pow Wow Grounds in Harbor Springs. For directions, events, and more info, visit http://odawahomecoming.weebly.com, or call 231-242-1427.

 
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