Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Ronny Cox
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Ronny Cox

STORIES AND SOUNDS

Kristi Kates - August 11th, 2014  


From the Silver Screen to Boyne Falls, four decades of entertainment is a most unexpected folk musician.

You’ve probably seen him, but not on stage; Cox is actually an acclaimed character actor on screen. He’s held down pivotal roles in such hit films as RoboCop, Bound for Glory, Total Recall, and Deliverance. But it’s music that really has a hold on his heart.

BANJOS TO CYBORGS

Cox’s film career debuted in a well known scene in the backwoods dramatic thriller Deliverance. He played the infamous tune “Dueling Banjos” on his guitar while kid actor Billy Redden matched him as a banjo-playing mountain boy. This critically acclaimed film would be the entryway to an extensive movie career spanning more than 40 years.

“Deliverance means a lot to me because it was my first film and practically everything that’s happened in my career is a direct result of that iconic movie,” Cox said.

Other roles are favorites of Cox’s for a range of reasons.

“Bound for Glory has a special place in my heart because it was about Woody Guthrie and led to my friendship with Woody’s daughter, Nora, and then to becoming friends with Arlo and his wonderful family,” Cox explained.

His turn in Beverly Hills Cop was his first stint in a blockbuster, “and I loved working with Eddie Murphy,” Cox said.

And RoboCop, he points out, was “almost as big a boon” to his career as Deliverance because he got to play a bad guy for the first time. “They’re always the most fun characters to play,” he added.

FILM TO FOLK

Growing up in Portales, New Mexico, Cox had an early involvement with music. He was calling square dances when he was ten years old and he started making records with his rock n’ roll band, Ron’s Rockouts, when he was in high school.

“I was struggling as a musician simultaneously while trying to make it as an actor,” he explained, “and the fact that I could play the guitar was instrumental - pun intended - in my getting the role of Drew in Deliverance.”

Music and acting, he contends, are both very similar and very different. But in spite of his film success, music has always had a stronger pull on him.

“You can’t step through the camera while acting, but you can talk directly to a folk music audience,” Cox said.

Another inspiration in Cox’s life was his wife, Mary, whom he met while they were still in high school. The couple married in 1960 and spent the next 46 years together until Mary passed away in 2006. At this point, Cox had to reevaluate his life; resolved to focus on his music from that point forward, but it would take a little more work to reach his musical destination.

After floundering around with a country music deal with Nashville’s Mercury Records, Cox finally found his calling in folk music.

“When I lost Mary, I made a life decision,” Cox said. “I now turn down about 90% of the film and TV roles offered to me. I won’t let any acting job interfere with a music gig. I love doing the music shows.”

CAMERA TO STAGE

Cox’s shows are very eclectic with a Southwestern flair, and he often talks about Mary in his musical performances. He’ll tackle any genre of song, as long as it’s a tune he can weave a story around.

A few you might hear in his set list are his unique covers of Randy Newman’s “Louisiana 1927,” Gene Autry’s “Trail to San Antone,” plus classics like “Hot Water Cornbread” and “Long Black Veil.”

“I perform with two wonderful musicians - Radoslav Lorkovic on keyboard and accordion, and T. Bruce Bowers on fiddle and mandolin. They are world class players, and there is no direction we won’t go,” he said.

Cox and his trio mates have a repertoire of over 75 songs; his favorites to perform change every week, but his goal, he says, is simply to create shared evenings with his audiences that tap in to the emotions of music.

While his films may last as an on-screen legacy, Cox’s performances on stage, while more fleeting, are moments he treasures on an even more personal level.

“I want the show to feel like we’re all sitting in the kitchen or on the back porch,” he explained. “My goal is to make you giggle out loud on one song, and weep on the next.”

Ronny Cox will be in concert Saturday, August 16 at Aten Place in Boyne Falls. For tix and more info call 231-549-2076 or visit www.atenplace.com.

 
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