Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - October 14th, 2004
Mike Keneally – The Universe Will Provide (Favored Nations)
Former Zappa guitarist Mike Keneally certainly learned a few things from Frank, and on “The Universe Will Provide” he puts some of them to use. His compositions are more like min-symphonies than rock songs, which makes sense given the fact he’s accompanied by the Metropole Orkest, a 60-piece Dutch orchestra. Keneally’s lines are ofttimes jarring, placed almost in opposition to the orchestra; at other times, the two blend, or the orchestra supports Keneally’s electric excursions. Keneally touches many bases here, from shred guitar to complex orchestral passages to sweeping melodic grandeur. If titles like “Worrywart Spoonguy” and “Four Slices of Toast” intrigue you rather than put you off, chances are the music will as well.

The Chieftains – The Long Black Veil (Mobile Fidelity)
Sting, Mick Jagger, Van Morrison, Sinead O’Connor, Mark Knopfler, Tom Jones – no wonder “The Long Black Veil” garnered notice by the masses and critical acclaim when it was released in 1995. Now this marriage of rock royalty and traditional Celtic music has been given glorious new life by the label famed for its painstaking approach to audiophile quality sound. Listen past O’Connor’s vocals on “The Foggy Dew” to the rolling drums in the distance and the pipes and bodhran, or the exquisite sound of the harp, flute and pipes on Morrison’s “Have I Told You Lately That I Love You?” that back the singer on a most heartfelt version of his hit. Really, any track here is divine, and is made all the more so by the incredible sound.


Brian Setzer – The Ultimate Collection (Surfdog)
The novelty of rockabilly bad boy Brian Setzer fronting a 17-piece big band has long since faded. Now the group can be appreciated for its musicality and muscle, and there’s certainly plenty of both on display on this double live CD. From “Brand New Cadillac” and “Sittin’ On It” from the band’s debut disc in 1994 to the surprise hit “Jump, Jive & Wail” to remakes of the themes from James Bond and “Hawaii Five-O” and big-band treatments of “Stray Cat Strut” and more, this disc swings and zings. His band boasts great soloists and a tight ensemble sound. Setzer is Setzer, of course, his growling guitar and bluesy vocals taking center stage most of the time.

Karrin Allyson – Wild For You (Concord)
Today’s best female jazz vocalist – save your arguments, it’s just the truth – turns back to her pop roots, with tunes by Joni Mitchell, Cat Stevens, James Taylor and Elton John, among others. Allyson’s sex kitten poses on the CD cover are hardly necessary, as the music itself is by turns sensual, playful, engaging, and always soulful. Like the greatest ballplayers, Allyson makes everything seem effortless. Her re-arrangements of “It’s Too Late” by Carole King is a great example of how she keeps the spirit of the original intact even as she and the band stretch out, with a great solo by guitarist Rod Fleeman before Allyson returns to the vocals and melody, then scats out to the end.
 
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