Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Take a Ride on the Baghdad...
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Take a Ride on the Baghdad Express

Nancy Sundstrom - May 15th, 2003
In the summer of 1990, writer Joel Turnipseed was adrift and aimless. He was homeless, and had been unceremoniously kicked out of a college philosophy program and dumped by his girlfriend. Being AWOL from his Marine Corps Reserve unit for more than three months and spending day after day hanging out in coffee shops were also on his list of dubious achievements.
Then Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, and Turnipseed found himself serving in Operation Desert Shield/Storm in the Sixth Motor Transport Battalion of the United States Marine Corps - the legendary “Baghdad Express“ - during the Persian Gulf War. His experiences were documented in a 1997 article he wrote for GQ Magazine, and the response to the story was so overwhelming, that he expanded it into a book that he named in honor of the battalion.
“Baghdad Express“ is a candid war memoir that deftly alternates between being hilariously funny and introspective (think “Catch 22“ or Richard Hooker’s “M*A*S*H“ meets “Catcher in the Rye“). Reading it in the wake of the primary fighting have been completed in Operation Iraqi Freedom gives one insight into both the Gulf War and the 2003 skirmish into which it morphed. It is also a decidedly personal story, one of a young man whose own moral ambiguity was brought into sharp focus by war, and whose inner struggles mirrored the conflict around him.
Turnipseed’s voice is a unique one, and his perspective, honed from equal parts of philosophy and cynicism, is that of a wisecracking misfit. The irony was never lost on him that he was part of the greatest logistical operation in Marine Corps history, as the Baghdad Express hauled truckloads of explosives and ammunition across hundreds of miles of desert. The potential for peace in his surroundings seemed about on par with the potential for peace within himself, and he could not deny the absurdities of the situations he found himself in as he struggled for daily survival.
From the onset, one knows that this is not someone who was cut out to be a soldier. But a writer? There is no question about that. Sample the flavor of this excerpt from the “Getting Lost“ chapter:

“We had to clear Jubayl of all the ammunition so that the pullout could begin; so the ammunition could be surveyed and sold to the Kuwaitis and Saudi Arabians. During the war, we had always driven in convoys. Three or four trucks, depending on how many made it back from Mishab. But when I showed up at the warehouse down at the port this time, they told me to take the lone truck idling outside.
“You‘re going up to ASP-3 by yourself today,“ said Robin, who hadn‘t left the port the entire war. “You need a map?“ I must have driven up there a dozen times. “It‘s right off the Abu Hadriyah, but it‘s easy to miss. I think the guys said the turnoff was marked by some tires and a red flag or a Toyota or something.“
I scrounged around for some load straps, then headed out to the port in my truck. The sun was just rising as I filled up at the fuel farm. The guys at the front gate waved me through without looking at my trip ticket, and I was on the road with another truck full of artillery shells.
I was driving past the on-ramps to the two-laners that went out to the airport and refineries. It was odd to drive alone. The skies were filled with black smoke, 360 degrees on the horizon, dark like oncoming night. With the sun beating down on my truck it felt like I was driving dead center in the middle of the Twilight Zone. I was lost. I had missed the exit to the Abu Hadriyah. The first exit I came to after figuring out I had blown it was a cloverleaf that went nowhere. Fifteen minutes later I came to another exit, and turned right heading north on a freshly paved two-laner. After hitting eighth gear I lit a cigarette, but hadn‘t even flicked the first ash from it when I slammed on the brakes. The road came to an end. Bam. The End. No more road - nothing but a big pile of gravel in the sand. There were tire tracks leading off the end of the road, so I figured it was safe to drive on. I pulled slowly off the highway, then eased into second gear around the construction site. It was muddy, but I made it through -
Until I was stuck.
I didn‘t even know how to back up. When a Filipino driving a water tanker came rolling through the desert behind me, I felt simultaneously relieved and like a moron. He parked his truck behind me, then jumped out of his cab.
“Hey, you stuck?“
“Yeah.“
“I‘ll push, you drive out, okay?“
I put the truck in gear, then sat on the clutch. When I felt the tanker smash into my trailer, I let out the clutch and gave it hell. I was free. A quarter-mile up the highway I pulled off to the shoulder, waiting for the Filipino to come and give me directions. When I looked back, he‘d disappeared. Vanished. I gazed across the desert: a wide-open sea without a single landmark. How could he disappear? But he did.“

Profane, edgy, funny, sharply observed, inquisitive, and passionate, “Baghdad Express“ takes a familiar premise - war being an insane situation - and juxtaposes it with the technology of the day and its Middle East desert battleground setting. It has an enormous amount in common with Michael Herr’s Vietnam tome “Dispatches,“ but is very much its own work. And even though more than 10 years have passed since the events in the book took place, it doesn’t seem dated in the least. If anything, the slightly amusing sense of deja vu happening all over again (in light of recent events) gives the book a framework now that makes it seem even more relevant. In every regard, “Baghdad Express“ is a journey well worth taking.

 
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