Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · What will I Do on 9/11?
. . . .

What will I Do on 9/11?

George Foster - September 12th, 2002
I don‘t remember who told me but the shocking news left me in a daze.
A year ago I heard about the terrorist attack as I stood in the Isle Royale ranger station. I had just hiked 10 miles that morning through some of the most beautiful wilderness in North America simultaneously while planes were ramming into skyscrapers. Without the benefit of live TV or radio coverage for most of that fateful day, images I had of the suicide attacks seemed like a horrific nightmare or surely someone‘s idea of a bad joke.
Sitting on the shore of Lake Superior for hour upon hour, I could only hope my grounded puddle-jumper would materialize after the FAA came to their senses and realized there were no terrorists on Isle Royale. Only a few hikers remained on the island and we all were anxious to return home in order to learn more details of the attack. Being cut off from mass communications at a time like this was nerve-wracking but turned out to be blessing in disguise. I was alone with my own thoughts: who could commit such an evil act? Was this the blow that would trigger World War III? I remember praying for the world.
Of course, one year later, the images of smoldering buildings, planes slicing into the World Trade Center, and people running for their lives have been played over and over by the media. The disturbing scenes have become etched in our collective memory forever. If I am forced to listen to Rudy Giuliani drone on one more time about how courageous New Yorkers are (of course, he is right), I will scream.
The one-year anniversary of the most infamous terrorist act in history falls this week. Some will stay glued to the tube, crying, as they watch those buildings collapse for the umpteenth time. Other enraged Americans will discuss bloody revenge against al-Qaeda, Iraq, and whoever seems remotely responsible. Some will shrink with fear from flying commercial flights, entering skyscrapers, or even leaving their home.
As for me - I can‘t imagine watching TV on that day. What can be said or reported by the media that is new? Who could they interview that we haven‘t heard recently? Only Osama bin Laden, himself.
Everyone will handle the anniversary in his or her own way. My inclination is to go back to my isolated island and focus on the beauty in this world. Somehow that, too, seems cowardly - running away while our nation is struggling to come to grips with an invisible enemy.
Remember how tolerant of others and how unified we all felt in the immediate aftermath of the tragedy? George W. Bush had a 110% approval rating. Americans traveled from thousands of miles away to volunteer at ground zero. Democrats held hands with Republicans. Firefighters were finally recognized as the heroes they always have been. Even Fidel Castro condemned the terrorist attacks against America.
The War on Terrorism declared by our government will take many years and work on several different levels. For me, September 11th is a reminder that my energy is best spent working to remove hostility in my own small world rather than focusing on rounding up enemies.
What better way to commemorate the anniversary of 9/11 than to tell your significant other that he or she is loved? Call a friend or family member with whom you have not spoken in a while and say that you care. Perform a random act of kindness for someone in need. Kiss your children. Pet your dog or cat vigorously. Give yourself a big pat on the back.
We will never forget the horror of September 11th, but these are also times that we could learn to love more and hate less.


 
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