Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Home Grown Authors - Part II
. . . .

Home Grown Authors - Part II

Nancy Sundstrom - August 29th, 2002
In the last installment of Express, we showcased four fine new works of non-fiction by Michigan authors. Here, we give equal time to some specialists in the fiction genre, each of whom has a growing following of fans that should increase with these latest works in their oeuvre.

More Than Enough by John Fulton
I’m still hungover from the intoxifying effects of “The Corrections“ by Jonathan Franzen, so I was just a little squeamish about settling into another tome bout a dysfunctional family at various degrees of breaking point, but I had thoroughly enjoyed Fulton’s first work, a short story collection entitled “Retribution,“ and was rather curious to see how he fared tackling the subject.
Readers won’t be disappointed with “More Than Enough“ from the Ann Arbor resident. Sometimes angry, sometimes heartbreaking, almost always poignant, it confirms the promise the author showed in his sure-footed debut, the ultimate triumph here being how much one comes to cared about his characters.
They are the Parkers - cockeyed optimist father Billy, pragmatic mother Mary, and their children, Steven and Jenny. After the siblings are attacked by a neighborhood gang in blue collar Salt Lake City, the family uses settlement money to build a better life, a catalyst that leads to each member grappling with what exactly that is. Billy wants security and creature comforts, but doesn’t necessarily want to work for them, forcing Mary to shoulder much of the burden of support. Jenny looks for the balance in life she believes the Mormon faith can insure. Steven sees his family disintegrating, and become painfully aware of how the legacy of violence begets itself.
This is potent stuff, especially since most of the action takes place in a concentrated time period, and the truth Fulton mines resonates with the realities of ambition and failure.

Sweetgrass and Smoke by Constance Cappel
After being published in 1996, Cappel’s “Hemingway in Michigan“ was instantly recognized by Hemingway experts as one of the more valuable works on a formative time in his life that nurtured him to become one of America’s greatest writer of fiction.
Cappel, a lifetime summer resident of Harbor Springs, is now back with an “experimental“ book that examines Hemingway’s relationship with the Native American community, set against the backdrop of a family cottage in Walloon Lake, Michigan. There, he came to know and fell in love with Prudence “Trudy“ Bolton, his first love who was also a Native American. Much like Hemingway himself, their relationship was volatile, passionate, and doomed - she was the woman who, according to Hemingway, “did first what no one has done better.“ She also died a tragic death at age 16, the impact of which would surface in different forms throughout some of his most powerful writing.
Cappel states in the introduction that she has long been intrigued with their story, and her meticulous research, pulled from newspaper stories, Hemingway biographies, letters, Native American texts, and prehistory theories combines for a work where fact and fiction merge nicely and provide valuable insights into both the Native American culture and a larger-than-life man who was deeply influenced by it. Hemingway afficionados won’t want to miss this one.

Bestseller by Christopher Knight
This Northern Michigan-based radio personality has fashioned a handsome writing career for himself in the recent years, and has a series of “Michigan Chillers“ books for young readers under the name of Jonathan Rand as well as the thrillers “St. Helena,“ “Ferocity,“ and “The Laurentian Channel“ to his credit. With each successive work, it’s evident he’s set the bar a little higher, aiming for the page-turning style of the likes of Koontz, Saul, and Patterson.
“Bestseller“ has a clever premise, and builds from there. Literary agent Anne Harper is taking a much-needed retreat at small cabin in northern Michigan to recharge her batteries and look for a potential new bestseller among a stack of unpublished manuscripts. She finds one delivered to her door - even though few know her whereabouts - that is named “Bestseller“ and has been written by a violent psychopath whose previous work she has rejected. This one is different, though. Not only does it have the genuine makings of a hit, it is about a literary agent who is stalked on her vacation by a violent psychopath whose previous work she has rejected.
The tension mounts as life imitates art, or vice-versa, but Knight delivers a number of unexpected turns, especially in the final pages, that kick this up a few notches, and tie all of the well-placed clues throughout the book together. In “Bestseller,“ demons don’t just lurk in dark corners or around the wooded pines at night, they leap from printed pages, fertile imaginations, and places that should bring repite.

Ben Zakkai’s Coffin by Harley L. Sachs
Express readers look forward to the regular columns of Sachs, the Houghton, U.P., resident who has also produced a number of audio books, including “Threads of the Covenant,“ “The Search for Jesse Bruan,“ and “Conspiracy.“
He’s proven himself to be a sharp-witted, imaginative crafter of mysteries, and this time, his protagonist is Herman Bachrach, a hard-boiled provocateur whose lack of religious conviction doesn’t prevent him from becoming entangled in a complicated web of deceit and greed centering round a Holocaust vendetta over stolen gold by a Swiss bank from Jewish depositors.
In a style that evokes Chandler and Hammett, Bachrach meets a femme fatale named Diana who lures him into a murder plot that becomes messy quickly and names him as a suspect. Bacharach makes a trek to Switzerland a he attempts to clear his name and stay one step aside of a growing list of foes, especially an elderly war criminal, who would just as soon have him out of the way permanently.
His discoveries as he doe so are anything but predictable, which is what elevates this from the slightly formulaic compromises of such a tale. There is a deliciously old-fashioned noir sense bout this engaging read, and one hopes there will be more installments with the Bachrach character.



 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close