Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · The Emperor of Ocean Park Probes...
. . . .

The Emperor of Ocean Park Probes Affluent Black America

Nancy Sundstrom - July 25th, 2002
Stephen Carter’s “The Emperor of Ocean Park“ is one book you won’t want to miss this summer. Smart, engrossing, tense, and loaded with provocative ideas on a range of subjects from justice to father-son relationships, it’s the sort of work that’s both satisfying and challenging.
“Emperor“ is the fictional debut of Carter, a Yale law professor and distinguished conservative African-American intellectual who has authored seven acclaimed nonfiction books, including “The Culture of Disbelief“ and “Civility.“
It was released to great acclaim, being heralded as a novel of great originality in terms of it being the saga of an African-American family of affluence and privilege who are forced to deal with their crimes and misdemeanors, and has created the same sort of literary excitement that was generated when John Grisham burst onto the scene with “The Firm.“ While that’s an easy comparison to make, “Emperor“ is a far more complex work, rich in social observation and personal insight.
The tale is set in two exclusive worlds, that of old-monied African-American society of the eastern seaboard who summer on Martha’s Vineyard, and an Ivy League law school.
In the opening chapter, “The Latest News by Phone,“we meet protagonist Talcott Garland, an African-American law professor at an elite university who is son of Judge Oliver Garland, a man with a brilliant legal mind who was conservative, controversial, and not without his share of enemies. Carter writes:

“This is the happiest day of my life,“ burbles my wife of nearly nine years on what will shortly become one of the saddest days of mine.
“I see,“ I answer, my tone conveying my hurt.
“Oh, Misha, grow up. I’m not comparing it with marrying you.“ A pause. “Or having a baby,“ she adds with a footnote.
“I know, I understand.“
Another pause. I hate pauses on the telephone, but, then, I hate the telephone itself, and much else besides. In the background, I hear a laughing male voice. Although it is almost eleven in the morning in the East, it is just nearing eight in San Francisco. But there is no need to be suspicious; she could be calling from a restaurant, a shopping mall, or a conference room.
Or not.
“I thought you would be happy for me,“ Kimmer says at last.
“I am happy for you,“ I assure her, far too late. “It’s just —.“
“Oh, Misha, come on.“ She is impatient now. “I’m not your father, okay? I know what I’m getting into. What happened to him is not going to happen to me. What happened to you is not going to happen to our son. Okay? Honey?“
Nothing happened to me, I almost lie, but I refrain, in part because I like the rare and scrumptious taste of Honey. With Kimmer for once so happy, I do not want to cause trouble. I certainly do not want to tell her that the joy I feel at her accomplishment is diminished by my concern over how my father will react. I say softly,“ I just worry about you, that’s all.“
“I can take care of myself,“ Kimmer assures me, a proposition so utterly true that it is frightening. I marvel at my wife’s capacity to hide good news, at least from her husband, She learned some time yesterday that her years of subtle lobbying and careful political contributions have at last paid off, that she is among the finalists for a vacancy on the federal court of appeals. I try not to wonder how many people she shared her joy with before she got around to calling home.“

From that passage, one immediately senses Tal’s wariness and paranoia, and we soon learn that most of that is not unfounded. He discovers that his father has just died, suddenly and suspiciously. Judge Garland was no stranger to scandal, having been on the brink of a Supreme Court nomination before having it stripped from him on national TV, when it was revealed in Senate hearings that he had a friendship with Jack Ziegler, a maverick former CIA agent rumored to be an organized crime boss.
The event bitterly humiliated him for the rest of his life, but when Ziegler turns up at his funeral, Tal must deal with him and a cryptic, mysterious message left by his father, entrusting him with “the arrangements.“ A successive series of clues linked to chess strategies (“you have little time.... Excelsior! It begins!“) are linked to more discoveries about his father’s past. Another death and more clues prompt Tal into action and a web of danger that could cost him his job, his family, and most likely his life.
“The Emperor of Ocean Park“ has all of the best ingredients for a juicy legal thriller. There are deep, dark family secrets, greed, ambition, intrigue, and betrayal, all played out by attorneys, government officials, powerbrokers, law professors, the FBI, shady underworld figures, chess masters, and various friends and relatives. Everything Tal comes in contact with is a threat, and the fragility of his own world is underscored at every turn. Events especially steamroll in the last 100 pages, making it very difficult to set down.
Carter certainly acquits himself as a masterful storyteller who brings an insider’s perspective too his insights, which are particularly keen on topics like race and power politics. Each surprising development is credible, and the author has raised the bar, no pun intended, for the genre. This will no doubt make it to the big screen some time soon, and would be a fitting vehicle for Oscar winners Denzel Washington and Halle Berry. In the meantime, book lovers can look forward to Carter’s next fictional outing, which will have to be quite something to top this one.



 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close