Letters

Letters 08-03-2015

Real Brownfields Deserve Dollars I read with interest the story on Brownfield development dollars in the July 20 issue. I applaud Dan Lathrop and other county commissioners who voted “No” on the Randolph Street project...

Hopping Mad Carlin Smith is hopping mad (“Will You Get Mad With Me?” 7-20-15). Somebody filed a fraudulent return using his identity, and he’s not alone. The AP estimates the government “pays more than $5 billion annually in fraudulent tax refunds.” Well, many of us have been hopping mad for years. This is because the number one tool Congress has used to fix this problem has been to cut the IRS budget –by $1.2 billion in the last 5 years...

Just Grumbling, No Solutions Mark Pontoni’s grumblings [recent Northern Express column] tell us much about him and virtually nothing about those he chooses to denigrate. We do learn that Pontoni may be the perfect political candidate. He’s arrogant, opinionated and obviously dimwitted...

A Racist Symbol I have to respond to Gordon Lee Dean’s letter claiming that the confederate battle flag is just a symbol of southern heritage and should not be banned from state displays. The heritage it represents was the treasonous effort to continue slavery by seceding from a democratic nation unwilling to maintain such a consummate evil...

Not So Thanks I would like to thank the individual who ran into and knocked over my Triumph motorcycle while it was parked at Lowe’s in TC on Friday the 24th. The $3,000 worth of damage was greatly appreciated. The big dent in the gas tank under the completely destroyed chrome badge was an especially nice touch...

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - November 11th, 2004
Elvis Costello – The Delivery Man – (UMG Records)

Here it is at last, the album almost no Elvis Costello fan was looking for: The followup to 1981’s “Almost Blue.” Costello shocked nearly everyone when he made the musical move to Nashville honky-tonk with that record, and on “The Delivery Man” Costello explores country twang and emotion once again. Guests include Lucinda Williams, Emmylou Harris, and John McFee, one of the members of Clover with whom he recorded his debut disc (McFee subsequently became a Doobie Brother). But this is more than just a country homage. There’s no shortage of rock voltage (“Bedlam” in particular) alongside the rootsy twang, while “The Name of This Thing Is Not Love” features jazzy lounge organ. And while “Almost Blue” was a collection of covers, Costello wrote or co-wrote all the tracks herein.

Elvis Costello – Il Sogno – (Deutsche Grammophon)

Okay, this is really the album no Elvis fan was expecting. But having delved into most every other type of music on the planet, perhaps we should have been looking for Costello to explore the palette of the symphony orchestra. But even if one could have anticipated such a move, no way would it have been expected that the disc would be so original, so rich, and so rewarding. Listeners will hear traces of Stravinsky, Debussy and Bernstein in the jazzy swells, playful dissonances, and bursts of orchestral color. This is a mature, full-bodied work that Costello himself orchestrated as well as wrote. Michael Tilson Thomas and the London Symphony Orchestra bring it all to glorious life.

Anita Baker – My Everything – (Blue Note)

Baker’s first new album in far too long – 10 years, to be exact. While tastes and trends have changed dramatically in that time, Baker has not. And that’s a good thing. Her rich alto hasn’t lost a thing, and her new songs are for the most part engaging, if not challenging. Maybe there’s nothing here on the level of “Sweet Love” or “Caught Up In The Rapture,” but there’s a lot here that comes close: The opening “You’re My Everything,” “Like You Used To Do” (a duet with Babyface), and especially the concluding “Men in My Life,” a paean to the domestic life, extolling the virtues of her husband and her sons. A welcome return.

Will Ackerman - Returning: Pieces For Guitar – 1970-2004 (Mary’s Tree)

As founder of Windham Hill, Ackerman is as responsible for New Age as anyone. His label released much of the genre’s formative music, by the likes of George Winston, Liz Story, Shadowfax, and his cousin Alex de Grassi. Ackerman puts to use over 20 years of listening and learning as he revisits some of the music he’s previously recorded. “In A Region Of Clouds” boasts a wistful, slightly countrified melody, while the gentle lines of the following “Last Day at the Beach” invite the listener to drift off, its gentle lines and ethereal beauty disappearing the way summer settles into fall. “Hawk Circle,” from 1980, and the following “Barbara’s Song,” written a decade earlier, work together beautifully, as does the entire album.


 
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