Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

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Strange Oscillations: Mysterious ‘seiche‘ Drops Bay Water Level by 18 Inches in Two Hours

Sandy Bradshaw - June 27th, 2002
On Tuesday morning, June 4th, 2002, West Grand Traverse Bay‘s water level dropped an astonishing 18 inches in less than two hours. A sailor was getting his boat ready for summer mooring and by the time he was all set to go - too late! His boat was stuck in a sandbar due to the sudden water level drop.
Known as a seiche, it is a phenomenon which occurs frequently on the bays of Northern Michigan. What is a seiche? Pronounced “saysh,“ you may compare it to water sloshing in a bathtub. Seiches are tide-like rises and drops in coastal water levels, (occurring both in fresh water and ocean waters) caused by prolonged strong winds that push water toward one side of the water body. This causes the water level to rise on the downwind side of the lake and to drop on the upwind side. As the wind diminishes, the water sloshes back and forth, with the near-shore water level rising and falling in decreasingly small amounts on both sides of the lake until it reaches equilibrium.
Seiches occur most in waters that are more or less surrounded by land, such as lakes, fjords and gulfs. Otherwise there would not be that sloshing back and forth that characterizes a seiche. Water blown onto a shore will just ebb back into the ocean if there is no opposite shore to reflect the wave. Seiches can also be caused by earthquakes, even very distant ones. Seiches triggered by earthquakes thousands of miles away have been reported.
“Seiches occur all the time on the bay,“ said John McKinney, past Maritime Heritage Alliance board member and Michigan Sea Grant agent. “This one was a bit larger than usual for Grand Traverse Bay though. Atmospheric pressure and wind changes helped contribute to the quick rise and fall of the bay. The western end of Lake Erie experiences large ones quite often - sometimes as high as six feet,“ he noted.
“Historically no one has taken records of the seiche effect,“ McKinney continued. “They are usually so small no one even notices them. A few years back we had a Japanese researcher, Dr. Uehara, take records on the bay with a special monitoring instrument every ten minutes. He conducted those measurements for six month stretches over a period of several years. This was documented on a graph, and shows seiche occurs constantly.“
According to Hans Joerg Rothenberger, a Swiss science and history buff
and skipper of a gaff cutter in Greece where seiches are
frequent, the word was first used in a scientific context by his
compatriot François-Alphonse Forel (1841 - 1912). “He was a professor of
anatomy and physiology, but known in international science rather as the
‘father of ‘imnology,‘ i.e. the science of lakes,“ said Rothenberger.
“Forel used the French word ‘seiche‘ for the first time in 1869 after
watching the phenomenon on Lake Geneva, a lake roughly the size of the
Grand Traverse Bay. He reported a seiche of eight days with about 200
oscillations. By the way, the question of the original meaning of the
word ‘seiche‘ gave rise to various theories, none of which is very
convincing.“
 
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