Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

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The Nanny Diaries Offers an Underdog‘s Glimpse of Park Avenue

Nancy Sundstrom - June 27th, 2002
“Wanted: One young woman to take care of four-year-old boy. Must be cheerful, enthusiastic and selfless-bordering on masochistic Must relish sixteen-hour shifts with a deliberately nap-deprived pre-schooler. Must love getting thrown up on, literally and figuratively, by everyone in his family Must enjoy the delicious anticipation of ridiculously erratic pay. Mostly, must love being treated like fungus found growing out of employer‘s Hermes bag. Those who take it personally need not apply.“

Who wouldn‘t want that job, you might ask, the above being from the jacket of “The Nanny Diaries,“ a glitzy train wreck of a novel that defies you constantly to put it down.
It holds many points of fascination, with its detailed, insider’s look into the Park Avenue apartments where women wouldn’t be seen without being draped in Prada, children attend Mommy and Me groups with their sitters and peers named Brandford and Darwin, and fathers, when they deign to make their presences known at all, are stunningly oblivious to the needs of their families.
Welcome to the world of “The Nanny Diaries,“ an instantly addictive read that manages to be - all at the same time - hilarious, complex, befuddling, riotous, poignant, and more than a bit sad, much like child-rearing itself.
Written by two former Manhattan nannies, Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus, who bill this as a work of fiction though much of it seems to ring way too true, even for those in the unwashed masses that include this reviewer, this best-selling novel charts the path of a nanny by the same name who is attempting to find a job that is compatible with her child development classes at NYU.
This modern-day Mary Poppins finds herself in the employ of the remarkably self-possessed and absorbed Mrs. X and her infidel husband Mr. X, looking after four-year-old Grayer, a genuinely good child who seems destined for neuroses, if for no other reason than that he has a schedule built around esteem groups, ice skating and French lessons, and teachers who want Nanny’s “methodology“ for dressing him each morning.
As the book opens, we meet Nanny as she makes a visit to the posh Parents League, looking for work:

“I tune out the officious, creamy chatter of the women behind me to read the postings put up by other nannies also in search of employment.

“Babysitter need children very like kids vacuums“
“I look your kids Many years work You call me“

The bulletin board is already so overcrowded with flyers that, with a twinge of guilt, I end up tacking my ad over someone else’s pink paper festooned with crayon flowers, but spend a few minutes ensuring that I’m only covering daisies and none of her pertinent information.
I wish I could tell these women that the secret to nanny advertising isn’t the decoration, it’s the punctuation - it’s all in the exclamation mark. While my ad is a minimalist three-by-five card, without so much as a smiley face on it, I liberally sprinkle my advertisement with exclamations, ending each of my desirable traits with the promise of a beaming smile and unflagging positivity.

Nanny at the Ready!
Chapin School alumna available weekdays part-time!
Excellent references!
Child Development Major at NYU!

The only thing I don’t have is an umbrella that makes me fly.
I do one last quick check for spelling, zip up my backpack, bid Alexis adieu, and jog down the marble steps out into the sweltering heat.
As I walk down Park Avenue the August sun is still low enough in the sky that the stroller parade is in full throttle. I pass many hot little people, looking resignedly uncomfortable in their sticky seats. They are too hot even to hold on to any of their usual traveling companions - blankets and bears are tucked into back stroller pockets. I chuckle to myself at the child who waves away the offer of a juice box with a flick of the head that says, “I couldn’t possibly be bothered with juice right now.“ “

Nanny settles in with the X family, and the games begin. The hilarious (and equally appalling) Mrs. X sees both her employee and her son as yet another status symbol, and subjects Nanny to a steady stream of bizarre demands, passive aggressive missives written on expensive stationery, and condescension. The family’s lifestyle gives a new meaning to the term “dysfunctional“ in a way not even Jonathan Franzen did in his amazing novel “The Corrections,“ though under these authors’ microscope, it’s a pretty frightening picture.
On the down side, there’s the disintegrating marriage of the X’s, Nanny’s 24-7 attempts to ensure that “a Park Avenue wife who doesn‘t work, cook, clean, or raise her own child has a smooth day,“ class struggle modern day servitude issues (since when does attending the preschool’s Family Day or helping aid and abet her employer in carrying on his extramarital affairs fall into one’s job description, both the reader and Nanny wonder?), and especially, the fragile emotional well being and psyche of her young charge.
On the up side, there’s the deepening bond that builds between Grayer and Nanny, who quickly emerges as one of the most consistent figures in his privileged, yet deprived young life. Were their relationship not as well-crafted and touching as it is, this might be a rather unpleasant read, but you come to care quickly about both, which contributes greatly to this thoroughly entertaining tell-all.
If you’re into audio books, check out Julia Roberts lending her voice to that version, and count on this making its way to the big screen in the not-too-distant future, possibly with Kate Hudson starring as Nanny. In the meantime, though, put “The Nanny Diaries“ on your summer reading list, sit back, and enjoy the book that has everyone - from Park Avenue wives to young women pregnant with their first child - buzzing.

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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