Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Books · Great Samaritan
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Great Samaritan

Nancy Sundstrom - February 6th, 2003
It has been four years since Richard Price wrote his last book, the vastly underrated “Freedomland,“ which was a follow-up to the brilliant “Clockers.“ For those, like this reviewer, who had to tough out the wait, the promise of good things to come began with the fact that Price had returned to the muse he has found in the fictional setting of Dempsey, New Jersey. Dempsey is the blighted, gritty city that has served as the backdrop for his past three novels, and just like those tour-de-force works of urban drama and despair, his newest, “Samaritan,“ builds its moral complexity from the streets on up to create a modern parable.
In his books and in numerous screenplays like “Ransom,“ “Sea of Love“ and “The Color of Money,“ Price’s calling card has become a meld of social conflict, taut mystery, razor-sharp dialogue, vividly drawn characters, and an attention to detail that has earned him a reputation as one of the best chroniclers of big city experience.
It is no surprise that all of those elements are here again, in one big, gripping, suspenseful, and challenging work. It is also not surprising that peers like Stephen King describe “Samaritan“ as “absolutely riveting“ and a master such as Elmore Leonard to opine ecstatically, using terms that range from “beautiful“ and “a gem“ to “terrific.“ Even the Wall Street Journal has weighed in with the assessment that “It all makes for an extraordinary novel, with the gritty plot of a hard-edged thriller and the cosmic concerns of a streetcorner Dostoyevsky.“
The protagonist in “Samaritan,“ is Ray Mitchell, a former high school teacher whose more recent and highly lucrative career as a TV writer has just come to an abrupt end, sending him back to his birthplace of Dempsey in an effort to rethink his life. Also on the agenda are reconnecting with Ruby, his teenage daughter, taking a stab at teaching again, and becoming a mentor to a former student who just got out of jail.
In the following two excerpts from the book’s prologue, “Out of Time: Ray - January 10,“ and then from the first chapter, respectively, we meet Ray as he orients himself to life back in Dempsey, at home and at his new place of employment:

“Ray Mitchell, white, forty-three, and his thirteen-year-old daughter, Ruby, sat perched on the top slat of a playground bench in the heart of the Hopewell Houses, a twenty-four-tower low-income housing project in the city of Dempsy, New Jersey.
It was just after sundown: a clear winter‘s night, the sky still holding on to that last tinge of electric blue. Directly above their heads, sneaker-fruit and snagged plastic bags dangled from bare tree limbs; above that, an encircling ring of fourteen-story buildings; hundreds of aluminum-framed eyes twitching TV-light silver, and above all, the stars, faintly panting, like dogs at rest.
They were alone, but Ray wasn‘t too concerned about it -- he had grown up in these houses; eighteen years ending in college, and naive or not he just couldn‘t quite regard Hopewell as an alien nation. Besides, a foot and a half of snow had fallen in the last two days and that kind of drama tended to put a hush on things, herd most of the worrisome stuff indoors. Not that it was even all that cold-they were reasonably comfortable sitting there under the yellow glow of sodium lights, looking out over the pristine crust under which, half-buried, were geodesic monkey bars, two concrete crawl-through barrels and three cement seals, only their snouts and eyes visible above the snow line, as if they were truly at sea.
Two Hispanic teenaged girls cocooned inside puffy coats and speaking through their scarves walked past the playground, talking to each other about various boys‘ hair. Ray attempted to catch his daughter‘s eye to see if she had overheard any of that but Ruby, embarrassed about being here, about not belonging here, studied her boots...
“Dad?“ Ruby said in a soft high voice. “When you were a child, did Grandma and Grandpa like living here?“
“When I was a child?“ Ray touched by her formality. “I guess. I mean, here was here, you know what I‘m saying? People lived where they lived. At least, back then they did.“
And from Chapter 1: Ray - January 4: “Entering Paulus Hook High School for only the second time since graduation twenty-five years earlier, Ray approached the security desk, a rickety card table set up beneath a blue-and-gold Christmas/Kwanza/Hanukkah banner, which still hung from the ceiling in the darkly varnished lobby four days into the New Year. The uniformed guard standing behind the sign-in book was a grandmotherly black woman: short, bespectacled, wearing an odd homemade uniform of fuzzy knit watch cap, gray slacks and a commando sweater, a khaki ribbed pullover with a saddle-shaped leather patch straddling the left shoulder.
“You got a visitor‘s pass?“ she asked Ray as he hunched over the sign-in sheet.
“Me? I‘m here to guest-teach a class.“
“They give you a teacher‘s ID?“
“A what?“ Then, “No...“
Straightening up, he was struck with a humid waft of boiled hot dogs and some kind of furry bean-based soup that threw him right back into tenth grade.
“Today‘s my first day.“

Ray is just beginning to settle into this new phase of his life when disaster strikes, and he is brutally beaten and left to die of a crushed skull in his own apartment. He knows who the attacker was, but won’t say or press charges, even though Nerese Ammons, a childhood friend who grew up to be a detective, keeps the pressure on him as he slips in and out of consciousness in ICU. As she furthers her investigation, she learns that there are a number of possible perpetrators with a motive to want to see Ray hurt, But even more frightening is that the victim himself seems more afraid of the truth than he does his own death.
Price skillfully weaves together the storylines attached to Ray’s past and his recovery with Nerese’s investigation, and it’s a testament to his considerable skills as a storyteller that even though all the clues are there, readers will be guessing the identity of the assailant right up until the end. And when that denouement is reached, the walloping punch it delivers has the impact it does not because of the identity that is revealed, but the superb way that Price dissects the motive, all of which is closely linked to some powerful assessments about human behavior, the nature of giving and forgiveness, and how easy it is to mistakenly believe we are doing someone a favor, when the opposite is, in fact, true. Price is a first-rate writer who seems to be at the height of his game, and “Samaritan“ is not only good, it aspires to greatness and achieves it. Even if we have to wait another four years for his next work, it will be worth it.

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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