Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Letters · Letters 5/30/02
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Letters 5/30/02

Various - May 30th, 2002
Reinventing radio

While interesting as far as it went, Pete Huntington’s cover article on alternatives to mainstream commercial radio (Reinventing Radio, May 16, 2002), suffered from a glaring omission.
Radio listeners with eclectic tastes have always known where to look: at the left end of the dial. Traverse City is blessed with a remarkably rich low end: two NPR stations! (Classical music on WIAA 88.7 and all-talk on WIPR 91.5) More to Huntington’s point about sources for alternative forms of music, however, is the jewel in the crown of Traverse City radio, WNMC, 90.7 FM. In the variety and quality of music it provides to the region it exceeds anything I was ever able to find in my years living in Chicago and the Atlanta/Athens, Georgia area. WNMC would be a great radio station anywhere and we are incredibly fortunate to have it here in Traverse City.
Huntington discusses the phenomenon of the “O Brother Where Art Thou?” soundtrack. Contrary to his observation, this record did get airplay on the radio: WNMC had “O Brother” in its current rotation from its first release. More importantly, WNMC’s regular weekly schedule filled with folk, blues, alternative country and American roots music programs provides a resource for people hungry for more of the kind of music they’ve been turned on to by the soundtrack.
WNMC’s rich musical diet provides large helpings of independent rock on top of the staples of jazz and blues. These are spiced up with programs featuring Reggae, World, New Age, African, Hip Hop, Funk and even
alternative Classical music. It’s really quite incredible how much tasty music can fit on one station in a single week.
I was gratified to learn that some commercial radio stations are “experimenting with... playing music created by local musicians.” But again, at WNMC this sort of programming is not exceptional it is the norm.
On a weekly basis the Local Motion program announces concerts and airs music from artists who are appearing in the region. Most of WNMC’s weekly Top 30 lists feature at least one of the local artists who are are
integrated into the album rotations. WNMC also regularly hosts live interviews and performances with both local and touring musicians.
WNMC is non-commercial radio, run almost completely by amateurs in the truest sense: people who do it for the love of it. You don’t need the expensive satellite radio systems Huntington discusses to get it in your car, and you don’t even need to go to your computer (but you can, because WNMC is webcast at www. wnmc.org. )
Your cover story on the future of radio was a missed opportunity. If the
future of radio is about innovative programming focussing on local artists
and great but neglected music, then the future of music is right here at 90.7 FM. It was a disservice to your readers who, if they don’t know about WNMC should be introduced, and if they do, should be reminded what a unique resource it is.

Eric Rosi-Marshall
 WNMC volunteer



Avoiding dog bites

As a board-certified plastic surgeon in the Grand Traverse area, I have often been called to repair the devastating injuries of a dog attack. Every 40 seconds, someone in America seeks medical care because of a dog bite. Children make up 60 percent of the 4.7 million Americans bitten by dogs each year. Tragically, some 20 people will die from dog attack injuries this year. Most disconcerting is that the problem is largely preventable with just a little public education.
Dog bites are not caused by “bad dogs” but by irresponsible dog owners. The Humane Society of the United States reports that dogs that have not been properly socialized to other people, who are not supervised or safely confined, who are not sterilized, or who get little attention and handling are those who often attack. Dogs who have not been spayed or neutered are three times more likely to bite.
As a plastic surgeon who has seen the damage caused by dog bites, I urge dog owners and parents to follow basic steps to avoid dog bites. Dog owners: obedience train your dog and keep it healthy. Parents: advise your child to never approach an unfamiliar dog and never run from or scream at a dog. To learn more about the national “Beware the Bite!” dog bite prevention campaign, visit the American Society of Plastic Surgeons’ web site at www.plasticsurgery.org.
In the event that you or someone you know is attacked by a dog seek emergency medical attention immediately. Plastic surgeons certified by the ABPS have extensive surgical training in preserving and rearranging skin and tissue on the face and all areas of the body. They offer the victim added assurance that the wound will heal properly, and the resulting scar will be as inconspicuous as possible.
Together, by educating the public on the issue and asking dog owners to train and restrain their dogs, we can prevent future tragedies.

F. Matthew Smith, M.D. member
American Society of Plastic
Surgeons

 
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