Letters

Letters 09-07-2015

DEJA VUE Traverse City faces the same question as faced by Ann Arbor Township several years ago. A builder wanted to construct a 250-student Montessori school on 7.78 acres. The land was zoned for suburban residential use. The proposed school building was permissible as a “conditional use.”

The Court Overreached Believe it or not, everyone who disagrees with the court’s ruling on gay marriage isn’t a hateful bigot. Some of us believe the Supreme Court simply usurped the rule of law by legislating from the bench...

Some Diversity, Huh? Either I’ve been misled or misinformed about the greater Traverse City area. I thought that everyone there was so ‘all inclusive’ and open to other peoples’ opinions and, though one may disagree with said person, that person was entitled to their opinion(s)...

Defending Good People I was deeply saddened to read Colleen Smith’s letter [in Aug. 24 issue] regarding her boycott of the State Theater. I know both Derek and Brandon personally and cannot begin to understand how someone could express such contempt for them...

Not Fascinating I really don’t understand how you can name Jada Johnson a fascinating person by being a hunter. There are thousands of hunters all over the world, shooting by gun and also by arrow; why is she so special? All the other people listed were amazing...

Back to Mayberry A phrase that is often used to describe the amiable qualities that make Traverse City a great place to live is “small-town charm,” conjuring images of life in 1940s small-town America. Where everyone in Mayberry greets each other by name, job descriptions are simple enough for Sarah Palin to understand, and milk is delivered to your door...

Don’t Be Threatened The August 31 issue had 10 letters(!) blasting a recent writer for her stance on gay marriage and the State Theatre. That is overkill. Ms. Smith has a right to her opinion, a right to comment in an open forum such as Northern Express...

Treat The Sickness Thank you to Grant Parsons for the editorial exposing the uglier residual of the criminalizing of drug use. Clean now, I struggled with addiction for a good portion of my adult life. I’ve never sold drugs or committed a violent crime, but I’ve been arrested, jailed, and eventually imprisoned. This did nothing but perpetuate shame, alienation, loss and continued use...

About A Girl -- Not Consider your audience, Thomas Kachadurian (“About A Girl” column). Preachy opinion pieces don’t change people’s minds. Example: “My view on abortion changed…It might be time for the rest of the country to catch up.” Opinion pieces work best when engaging the reader, not directing the reader...

Disappointed I am disappointed with the tone of many of the August 31 responses to Colleen Smith’s Letter to the Editor from the previous week. I do not hold Ms. Smith’s opinion; however, if we live in a diverse community, by definition, people will hold different views, value different things, look and act different from one another...

Free Will To Love I want to start off by saying I love Northern Express. It is well written, unbiased and always a pleasure to read. I am sorry I missed last month’s article referred to in the Aug. 24 letter titled, “No More State Theater.”

Home · Articles · News · Books · Goth & Doom Revealed
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Goth & Doom Revealed

Nancy Sundstrom - May 16th, 2002
New twists on the gothic horror novel and the biography result in some startling fresh takes on these genres in two works out in paperback from Vintage Books, a New York-based publishing company who never seem at a loss for discovering or printing provocative works and authors.
In this case, the tomes are “Observatory Mansions,“ the first novel from English playwright and illustrator Edward Carey, and “The Fatal Englishman: Three Short Lives,“ by Sebastian Faulks, the bestselling author of “Birdsong“ and “Charlotte Gray,“ which was recently made into a film with Cate Blanchett.
Both are compelling works that breathe new air into their respective genres. There‘s never a shortage of powerful, moving, eloquent, or stylishly crafted books in the literary world, but if one subscribes to the idea that there really are no new ideas, you can go along with the reasoning that it becomes more difficult to introduce a sense of wonder or discovery into a particular category of storytelling. Happily, these two books provide a strong argument to that thinking.

Observatory Mansions by Edward Carey
Meet the Orme family, whose “Magnificent Ambersons“-like estate in an unknown city has crumbled into disrepair and is now a bizarre apartment complex that houses a wildly eccentric group of tenants. One of those is Francis Orme, who is a living statue by trade and practices “inner and outer stillness“ as a way of life and steals precious possessions from others for his private museum.
In the opening chapter, narrator Francis introduces us to himself ans his home:

“I wrote white gloves. I lived with my mother and father. I was not a child. I was thirty-seven years old. My bottom lip was swollen. I wore white gloves though I was not a servant. I did not play in a brass band. I was not a waiter. I was not a magician. I was the attendant of a museum. I wore white gloves so that I would not have to touch anything with my bare hands. I wore white gloves so that I would not have to look at my own hands. I live in a city, as many people do, a small city, an unspectacular city, not very famous city. I lived in a large building, but had access only to a small part of it. Other people lived around me. I hardly knew them. The building we lived in was a huge, four-storey cube in the neo-classical design called Observatory Mansions. Observatory Mansions was dirty. Black stains like large unhealing scabs fouled the exterior, and sprayed on its grey walls in red and yellow car paint were various messages delivered at night by some anonymous vandal. The most immediately noticeable being: And even you can find love.“

In addition to Francis, who (along with the book) seems destined for a Tim Burton film, the inspired cast of characters includes his parents, who haven‚t interacted in years, a man who is either sweating or crying, a TV-obsessed spinster, and a woman who acts more like a dog than the real thing. Into this entourage comes Anna Tapp, a woman who is slowly going blind who arouses long forgotten memories and never-before-discovered emotions, and sets into motion a chain of events that are as unpredictable as they are unforgettable.
There are many writers whom author Carey seems to invoke, but the end result is uniquely his.
Upon its publication in England, John Fowles called it “easily the most brilliant fiction I‘ve seen this year,“ and one can argue a strong case for that, as well.

The Fatal Englishman: Three Short Lives by Sebastian Faulks
This book is notable for several reasons, among them being that this is the first work of non-fiction ever attempted by Faulks, and in it, he explores the lives of three quite remarkable Englishmen - each a beacon of sorts to his generation, and a light cut off while quite young.
The three subjects are: Christopher Wood, a charming, handsome painter who lived most of his short life of 29 years in the beau monde of 1920‘s Paris, until he killed himself, frustrated by the conflicts of ambition and achievement; Richard Hillary, a WWII fighter pilot who wrote an acclaimed account of his experiences, “The Last Enemy,“ but died while he was 23-years-old in a strange training accident while defying doctor‚s orders to stay grounded due to burn injuries; and Jeremy Wolfenden, a journalist, spy, alcoholic, open homosexual, and academic who was hailed by his contemporaries as one of the brightest of his generation, though notoriously reckless.
Faulks‘ portraits are each vivid, and he captures an extraordinary amount of detail in quick turns of phrase, as evidenced by the opening paragraph of Wood‚s story:

“One day in the spring of 1921 a beautiful young Englishman set off for Paris to become the greatest painter the world had ever seen. His name was Christopher Wood and he was nineteen years old. Until he took the boat for Calais on 19 March he was working for a fruit importer in the City of London. He was the son of a doctor in the North West of England, and his sudden disappearance to France confirmed his family‘s worst fears. Although Christopher wore shirts from the best outfitters in Jermyn Street, was well-mannered and polite to his parents, he seemed to have no understanding of middle-class convention. Some combination of circumstances had combined with a fierce streak in his character to make him wild and ambitious. He was determined to be a painter, and the intensity of his desire was frightening to his parents.“

All three of the lives here were brief and brilliant, ambitious and addicted, different and doomed, and vital and vexed. Wolfenden‘s story is particularly well-crafted, and as Faulks relates their tales to that of a country in the midst of serious change, he symbolizes Britain‘s own loss of identity and innocence.
 
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