Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · We, Robots: The Japanese are...
. . . .

We, Robots: The Japanese are Bringing More ‘Bots our Way

Harley Sachs - January 13th, 2005
Mention robots and some people think of that old sci-fi situation comedy, “Lost in Space,” with a frantic robot waving its arms and yelling “danger, danger.” What they don’t realize is what a robot really is, how many are already in our lives, and what the next generation may be.
Just what is a robot, anyway? They began in World War II as servo mechanisms, devices that took the effort out of jobs that were strenuous if not impossible for human beings to do, such as controlling the wing and tail surfaces of bombers. A simple “joy stick” like those in the old open cockpit World War I fighters would demand too much strength in a bomber.
Servo mechanisms such as auto pilots on airplanes have something similar in the cruise control in my Ford Taurus, except my cruise control doesn’t allow me to take a nap at the wheel. Someday they will.
We are, in fact, surrounded by automatic mechanical servants. One might argue that an automatic toaster is not a robot, but there’s no disputing that the new disk-like, self-propelled vacuum cleaner now being advertised on television is a robot. It is programmable and once sent into motion does its job without human intervention.
That’s a step beyond the garden sprinkler that drags itself along, guided by its own hose, but the basic idea is similar.
Now there is a whole new generation of robots. The Japanese -- gadget fanatics -- are the great innovators. Robots come in roughly four categories: entertainment, home clean-up and guardians, industrial, and special function robots.
The entertainment gadgets are familiar to anyone who has wandered the aisles of Toys R Us -- robot dogs that bark and do tricks, humanoid-shaped robots that dance, and mechanical pets. The SDR-4X II can sing, dance, and speak with a vocabulary of 60,000 words. That’s more than in my old pocket dictionary. The SDR-4X II can recognize people by the sound of their voices and even hold a conversation. You can visit this rascal at www.tokyodv.com/news
There’s another Japanese robot called tama that roughly resembles Garfield the cat but has a practical purpose, as it can be hooked up to a cell phone and serve social workers dealing with the elderly. Imagine your robotic “cat” telling you it’s time to take your meds! Makes the Chuckie monster movies more frightening than ever.
The home alone robots can actually work as guardians. The maron-1 can help run appliances and sound an alarm if it detects an intruder.
The ifbot by Sanyo can understand human language, especially if you speak Japanese, and recognize up to 10 persons from their faces or voice.
Sounds like one of these gadgets could be trained -- excuse me, programmed -- to act as a baby sitter and call for help in case of trouble.
These are not much more than toys, but there are serious robots that do important services, such as the robotic painter that can work in an environment that would kill a human worker. Auto commercials often show assembly lines “manned” by robotic welders that unerringly move through their programmed routines, don’t get bored or sleepy, and aren’t hurt by the fumes.
In case of fires or earthquakes, there are robots that can wriggle snake-like through small passages to find trapped victims, or travel inside pipelines and inspect for malfunctions, leaks, or blockages. For wartime, a robot has been developed that seeks out buried land mines and marks the earth so crews can dig them up.
Perhaps the most ambitious robot being developed uses artificial intelligence and is said to be as smart as a five year old. Anyone who has experienced a two year old in the house will wonder what mischief a robot with a five year old’s intelligence might get into.
In Isaac Asimov’s classic science fiction book, “I Robot,” machines are ethically programmed to do no harm to humans. Extended to the ultimate that meant preventing humans from any activity that might injure them, such as knitting (those needles could hurt you) and the humans become virtual prisoners of their servant machines.
Then there’s the classic “The Machine Stops” story in which people live inside what might be termed a giant robot dwelling which repairs itself and takes care of all their needs. In the end the machine that repairs the machine itself wears out.
From what we’ve seen of computers and appliances, it’s not the wearing out and breaking down of our robotic machines that’s the problem. It’s the rapid obsolescence that forces us to upgrade to the newer model, the Japanese answer to Microsoft and Bill Gates. So your robot cooks only a few favorite meals and has the mentality of a five year old? Forget about macaroni and cheese dinners and games of Go Fish. Upgrade now, if you can afford the new model and want a robot that always beats you at cribbage or bridge, then makes smart remarks. No thanks.

Harley L. Sachs, author of “Ben Zakkai’s Coffin” and “A Troll for Christmas” at ZumayaPublications, Mystery Club cozies at Wings ePress, “Scratch--out!” by Fire Mountain Press and books from IDEVCO.

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5