Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

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Earth Day

- April 18th, 2002
Calling all species for Earth Day

After a spectacular All Species Parade held last Earth Day, filled with giant puppets, masks and costumes, organizers of this year‘s event are hoping to achieve the same heights this Sunday, April 21 at 1 p.m. in Traverse City.
The parade celebrates the animals, birds, fish and plants of the natural world, with kids and parents encouraged to dress up as their favorite lifeform. Last year‘s parade featured several hundred marchers with some papier mache puppets towering 10 feet above the pavement. Artist Penny Krebiehl has been a guiding force in helping to create the puppets and masks through a series of workshops.
This year‘s event begins with paraders gathering at 12:30 p.m. at F&M Park (Washington and Railroad streets), with the parade beginning at 1 p.m. down Washington to a rally at the Civic Center. The rally will include music, entertainment, speakers, information tables and refreshments
For more information contact The Neahtawanta Center at 231 223-7315 or 800 220-1415. Web: www.nrec.org/eday02
In other Earth Day news, volunteers are being sought to help clean up the Leelanau and TART trails on Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon. Traverse Area Recreation and Transportation (TART) Trails, Inc. will provide refreshments for volunteers. Meet at the Leelanau trailhead at Cherry Bend Rd. or at the TART Trail at 4 Mile Rd. in TC if you‘d like to help, and bring your own gloves and trash bags to save expenses. Contact the TART Trails office at 941-4300 for info.

Speaker urges peace for Palestinians

Palestinian human rights advocate Hanan Elmasu will come to Traverse City as part of a nationwide speaking tour to educate Americans about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, what must be done to end the cycle of violence in the region, and actions that U.S. citizens can take to help promote a lasting and just peace in the Middle East.
Elmasu and Ted Lewis, Human Rights Program Director at Global Exchange and Coordinator of the Palestine Campaign, will speak on Thursday, April 25, 7 pm., at Immaculate Conception Church, Centennial Hall, 720 2nd Street, Traverse City. An Arabic potluck dinner will precede the program at 6 pm.
In conjunction with Elmasu and Lewis’ visit, local people have arranged to support a Detroit area effort to send relief to the besieged Palestinians in the cities and towns occupied by the Israeli army. Donations of clean, new or gently used clothing and outerwear, school supplies and backpacks, shoes, blankets and nonperishable first aid supplies can be made at Oryana Food Coop, 260 E. 10th Street, Traverse City through April 19.
In recent weeks, violence and desperation have worsened in Israel and the Israeli-occupied territories. The 2.7 million Palestinians living under occupation—frustrated with a frozen peace process — staged an uprising that has moved from street demonstrations to escalating lethal violence between Israeli forces and the Palestinians. Israeli demands that the Palestinian Authorities eliminate violence are undermined by the Israeli invasions of Palestinian territories, continued occupation, massive expansion of Israeli settlements and destruction of Palestinian security and civil infrastructure.
“As the cyclical violence worsens, the Bush Administration has failed to use its clout (in the form of more than $3 billion in annual aid) to pressure Israel to end its occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, which world opinion overwhelmingly identifies as the root of the problem,” Elmasu said. “Meanwhile, the U.S. media continues to portray the Palestinians as the aggressors in the conflict, generally failing to cite the conditions of the occupation and the current devastation of the entire Palestinian population at the hands of the Israeli army.”


All hands on deck

The paperback edition of Lake Ann author Doug Stanton‘s book, “In Harm‘s Way,“ will hit bookshelves May 7 with a planned release of 1 million copies. Published by St. Martin‘s Press, the book spent five months on the New York Times bestseller list, with 200,000 hardcover copies sold. Hollywood is interested: Warner Brothers renewed its option on the book in January and director Barry Levinson (Good Morning Vietnam, Rain Man, Bandits and Diner), is writing the script for the movie. Stanton will sign copies of the book May 18th, 1-3 p.m., at Horizon Books in TC.

A nice rack of lamb...

Have wolves been a problem with your livestock lately? A State program will compensate you for your dead cattle.
There have been 12 confirmed cattle killings attributed to wolves in the Upper Peninsula since 1989.
Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Menominee notes that there‘s a compensation fund available through the Michigan Department of Agriculture which has drawn attention lately because of concerns raised at recent Upper Peninsula town meetings about wolf depredation.
“U.P. residents have expressed concerns, both about personal experiences with wolf attacks against livestock, and about news reports of such attacks,“ Stupak said. The congressman since mid-January has met with U.P. residents at town hall meetings in Houghton, Ironwood, Kingsford, L‘Anse, Marquette, Newberry, Ontonagon and St. Ignace.
Because there may be disagreement over the market value of a young or
newborn animal, Stupak said, the balance of compensation can be paid from
private donations through the International Wolf Center in Ely, Minn.
The grey wolf, which is still listed as an endangered species, is being reevaluated at both the state and federal level, and may be relisted at the federal level as a “threatened“ species as early as this summer. At present, there are no known wolves roaming the lower peninsula.

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