Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · The Real Land Down Under: Brian...
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The Real Land Down Under: Brian Lea‘s Antarctic Adventure

Danielle Horvath - April 18th, 2002
Brian Lea has an adventurous spirit. Whether running the Boston Marathon or scaling a mountain somewhere out west, he‘s one of those types that doesn‘t sit still too long. And since turning 50 last year, Brian has decided to embark on fulfilling some of his life-long quests. One of them happened last fall when he spent two months in Antarctica, as part of a job with the Raytheon Polar Services Company to work as an electrician on the construction of a new research station.
It took six planes and 24 hours to travel from Northern Michigan to New Zealand, where Lea underwent training in how to dress and prepare for the frigid climate. The last six hours of the trip was in a military-style cargo plane from the U.S. McMurdo Station on the edge of Antarctica to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
“It was quite a shock when I got off that warm plane and into the air. It was minus 58 degrees, I never felt air that cold!“ Lea explained.

For the next two months, Lea‘s “home“ was a 4‘x8‘ space inside an underground aluminum geodesic dome. It was originally a 3-story structure built in 1975 for communications and science and weather research. The extremely arid environment limits annual snowfall; however, a relatively constant wind speed of 5-15 knots accounts for heavy snow drifting common to inland Antarctica stations. Because of this, the present dome has become buried and is being replaced by a 60,000 square foot elevated station.
“It wasn‘t like snow that we‘re used to, it was more like dust, ice crystals, you couldn‘t hardly see it in your hand. And it was strange because there were no clouds, there was sunshine all the time. There was really no night, the sun moved around the sky during the day, rather than across it like we‘re used to.“ Lea was lucky enough to get a window in his bunk, which he would have to darken to sleep.
For someone who likes to run, Lea found the isolation a challenge. “There wasn‘t a lot of personal space, and a limited number of things to do besides work,“ he offered, “there was a small gym and I did run some indoors. I tried to run outdoors but it was almost impossible with the thin air, extreme cold and heavy clothes.“

Lea also missed daily contact with the outside world. “There was not much daily news from home, and that was hard, especially during these uncertain times. There was no live TV or radio; it came from the Internet and because the pole is so low in the sky, the satellite hook-up was available only during daytime hours. But it was an adventure I wanted to try, I learned a lot about the area and it was inspiring to be able to stand at the bottom of the Earth.“
The company is five years into a nine-year project to complete the new research station by 2005. Lea worked 9 hours a day, 6 days a week. Average pay is about 50% more for most jobs than in the states. The company supplies all the cold weather gear as well as round-trip air transportation, food and living quarters.
The company is always looking for eligible candidates that want to try an adventure. Lea recommends someone in good physical shape that can handle the extreme weather and isolation. For more information, call the Raytheon Company at 800-688-6606. For information on Antarctica, check out the National Science Foundation website at www.nsf.gov.


‘129 degrees below zero‘
National Geographic Antarctica Facts:

a. Since 1959, the terms of a multinational treaty have dedicated the continent to peaceful use and free exchange of scientific information. Some countries make territorial claims, but military activities and mineral exploration have been prohibited indefinitely.
b. The South Pole, elevation 9,031 feet, is unlike any other place on Earth. The sun rises once each year, around September 21 and sets once each year, around March 21. Thermometer readings drop below minus 50 degrees on more than 250 days. Precipitation falls from a clear sky almost daily; ice crystals drop from the clouds, too diffuse to be seen.
c. The ice sheet smoothes out where it flows over the surface of liquid Lake Vostok, buried deep below the ice, it is suspected of being as large as Lake Superior and may contain life. Located at the lake‘s south end, Russia‘s Vostock Station in 1983 recorded the lowest temperature ever measured on Earth: 129 degrees below zero.
d. Able to survive months of dry, frigid darkness, lichens and mosses are Antarctica‘s dominant plants. The largest land animal is a windless midge about 1/2 inch long.
e. Antarctica is a mapmaker‘s nightmare - by the time it is drawn, it is likely to have changed significantly. Floating ice shelves and advancing and retreating glaciers make up nearly 60% of the coast. Massive icebergs regularly calve from the ice shelves, knocking divots the size of small U.S. states from the outline of the continent.
f. The Antarctic peninsula, a mountain range welded to clusters of islands by a relatively thin coat of ice, this 800-mile long peninsula is populated with penguins, and other seabirds including gulls, skuas and petrels and provides important habitat for several seal species.
g. Almost a century ago iron men named Amundsen, Shackleton and Scott raced exhaustion, starvation, frostbite and each other to the South Pole. Planting Norway‘s flag, Amundsen won. Today, satellite and ground-based observations help scientists understand the continent and its global impact.
h. When winter comes, the ocean surface around Antarctica begins to freeze. Spreading over an average of 30,000 square miles a day, the ring of sea ice eventually covers more than seven million square miles, an area larger than the continent itself. Reducing the ocean‘s absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide and blocking ocean-atmospheric heat exchange, sea ice plays a role in shaping regional climate that in turn has impacts over much of the globe.

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