Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · Medical marijuana meeting
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Medical marijuana meeting

Staff Reports - August 19th, 2004
Medical marijuana meeting
Laura and Matthew Barber, who are at the center of a medical marijuana case in Traverse City, are planning an informational meeting/fundraiser at their home this Sunday, Aug. 22 at 1 p.m. to share their story with the public.
Matthew is a multiple sclerosis patient and Gulf War veteran who says he was told by a neurologist that smoking marijuana could be helpful in controlling the spasms and pain of his disease. He and his wife Laura feel that the continued use of marijuana is a matter of life and death in his case, and have vowed to keep smoking the herb.
The event will include a number of prominent speakers, including local attorney and civil rights advocate Dean Robb; Tim Beck of the Detroit Coalition for Compassionate Care, which has placed a medical marijuana iinitiative on Detroit’s ballot; members of the national NORML organization; and Melody Karr of the Cannabis Action Network, among others.
Laura Barber says the couple is getting by on a minimal budget drawn from her small landscaping company and Matthew’s Army pension. Meeting legal and medical bills has been an overwhelming concern. “I’m working two jobs trying to keep us afloat,” she says. “Matthew and I have been through awful times these past two years. We’re not rich people by any means, we’re just average Americans trying to get by on an Army pension.”
The public is invited to attend the meeting at their home at 2802 Holiday Pines Road off 5 Mile in Traverse City.

Fixer Upper
Providing tax incentives to redevelop rundown neighborhoods is the goal of new Neighborhood Enterprise Zones (NEZs) legislation passed the Michigan Senate. The bill, Senate Bill 1206, is part of the C.O.R.E. package
(Creating Opportunities for Renewed Economies) which is spear-headed by State Sen. Jason Allen.
Neighborhood Enterprise Zones are a tool available to cities for the redevelopment of rundown housing areas. It freezes the assessed value of the property for a period of time, so renovations can be made without an immediate impact on the property taxes.
The bill will allow for cities without housing inspection ordinances to establish a NEZ, although inspections of the housing in the NEZ would still be required. It also allows for flexibility in the time frame they are designated. Under current law a NEZ must be designated for 12 years, but the bill would change that to allow for a period between 6 and 12 years.
The bill now moves to the House where it awaits a committee hearing along with five other bills in the CORE package.
 
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