Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Thinking big with TED
. . . .

Thinking big with TED

Ross Boissoneau - May 16th, 2011
Thinking big with TED: Conference aims to stretch boundaries of inspiration
By Ross Boissoneau
Ted is coming to Traverse City.
Make that TEDx. A daylong conference at Milliken Auditorium on Tuesday,
May 17, TEDx will feature speakers from across the spectrum making brief
presentations designed to inspire attendees.
That has been the goal of the entire TED initiative since it began in
1984. Originally focused on bridging Technology, Entertainment, and Design
– hence the name – its scope has become ever broader. Along with annual
conferences held in Long Beach and Palm Springs each spring, and the
TEDGlobal conference in Edinburgh, UK each summer, various TEDx one-day
events have sprung up across the globe.
Now it’s Traverse City’s turn.
Paul Sutherland, principal of Financial Investment Management Group, and
Northwestern Michigan College President Tim Nelson had attended the TED
conferences, and decided to join forces to bring the one-day event to
Traverse City. Along with Karen Ruedinger of NMC and Kelly Kuhns and Sara
Harding of FIM Group, they set out to create an event to engage,
challenge, and inspire attendees.

NEW IDEAS
“We wanted to bring ideas here,” said Sutherland. “We knew some really
great people, speakers who were always looking for a reason to come here.
They all thought it would be cool to do a TED here.”
They must have thought it would be cool indeed, since one of the
requirements is that the speakers cannot be paid. That hasn’t stopped
people like Al Gore, Steve Jobs, Jane Goodall, Bill and Melinda Gates,
J.J. Abrams, Rick Warren, Thomas Dolby, and a host of other equally and
lesser-known figures from becoming part of the TED conferences.
Locally, the lineup is just as eclectic: journalist/activist J. Carl
Ganter on water, writer Jerry Dennis on creativity, Neeli Bendapudi on
brand choices and loyalty, David Kenneth on the science and art of 3D
technology. In all, 16 speakers will take the stage.
“It’s amazing to read all their bios,” said Kuhns, who worked with the
speakers to bring them to Traverse City. “It’s humbling to realize the
energy, creativity, motivation they have. People (in the audience) won’t
be bored.”
As one example, she points to photojournalist Paola Gianturco. For the
past 13 years, she has documented women’s lives in 40 countries. Her most
recent book, “Women Who Light the Dark,” tells the story of local women
around the world who are helping one another tackle the problems that
darken their lives, including violence, poverty, illiteracy and disease.
Gianturco is giving 100% of her author royalties for this book to The
Global Fund for Women.

VERY EVANGELICAL
Sutherland hopes and believes that the stories they tell will galvanize
the audience. “When you’re around creative people, you can say, ‘I can do
this.’ It’s got to inspire you,” he said. “People are very evangelical,
and want to share their passions.”
The event is sold out, which both pleases and dismays those in charge.
They would like to be able to have more people attend, but are also afraid
that it might lose its intimacy if it was held in a larger venue.
“Tickets sold out in two weeks,” said Kuhns. “We have people on a waiting
list.”
Some might not readily see the appeal of sitting in an auditorium all day
listening to a bunch of people talk. But not only are the presenters
interesting, Sutherland said one of the best parts of the conference comes
between the speakers, when audience members interact with one another.
“How can you be thinking big when you’re in Traverse City?” he said. “It’s
hard for people to share their dreams and big ideas. At TED you get
support.
“You’re going there because you’re excited,” Kuhns said. “It’s brain food.”
 
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