Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

Home · Articles · News · Art · The Contemporary Quilts of Sarah...
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The Contemporary Quilts of Sarah Bearup-Neal

Al Parker - June 20th, 2011
It’s been about 25 years since Sarah Bearup-Neal visited a small historical museum in Flint and was taken aback by what she saw there.
“There was a twist,” she recalls. “The quilts were hung from the ceiling rather than spread horizontally across a bed. It was explained to me these quilts were being exhibited for the strength of their design.”
Quilts as Art?
“The idea struck me as revolutionary and it germinated inside my brain for 20 years,” she says.
Art has been part of Bearup-Neal’s life since she was growing up in Grand Blanc, south of Flint. In 1978, she earned a BFA in studio art from Michigan State University. Despite this background, she didn’t pursue art professionally until the late 1990s when she displayed her fiber arts.
“I created women’s clothing using techniques from the quilting world,” she explains. “But then I decided my heart wasn’t really in that and I began really studying contemporary quilts. They’re different from traditional quilts. People believe they just belong in the bedroom. Quilting as an art medium is sometimes difficult for people to get their minds around.”

In 2003 she began studying and producing contemporary art quilts and has been pursuing that creative art form since. One highlight of her training was a session with noted fabric instructor Nancy Crow who teaches quilting as an art at the Timberframe Barn Workshop in Baltimore OH.
The result is a number of colorful quilts that have earned Bearup-Neal acclaim for their creativity and design.
Contemporary quilts differ from traditional quilts in that there is no pattern to follow. They are original compositions designed by the artisans. “There are no commercial patterns or stencils,” says Bearup-Neal. “They are all original compositions.”
“I’m an artist,” she says. “A painter has paints, my comparable medium is fabric. I have the same concerns as a painter – I’m concerned about composition, design, color values and, in the back of my mind, what can I make to satisfy my creativity.”
Like most artists, Bearup-Neal’s creative process begins with an idea.
“I’ll get an idea, say a circle, then I’ll start sketching,” she explains. “I’ll get a rough sketch of a circle with some notes. Then I’ll pin that to my ‘design wall’ and pull some fabric from my stash and have sort of an ‘audition’ for the fabric to see what works.”
Bearup-Neal isn’t restricted to the original design, by any means.
“Sometimes the final design is the third cousin fifth-removed from the original,” she says with a laugh. “I’m not locked into the sketch. The design is just a roadmap. And I like to have a deadline. For me, the deadline is my friend.”

When Bearup-Neal is satisfied with a design, she’ll pin it together and begin the process of sewing on one of the six sewing machines she has in her workshop at her home in Almira Township in northeastern Benzie County.
“I prefer the no-frills older ones,” she says. “They’re better constructed and I don’t need a lot of fancy attachments. I have two Singer Featherweights that I really like and I use a Bernina for some things. I love old sewing machines.”
Each quilt is made of three layers – the front, the back and an interior layer of cotton batting. A typical major piece measures 45x75 inches. From design to the final spin through the washer and dryer, that project would take about a month to complete. She also makes smaller pieces, banners and squares.
For her quilting material, Bearup-Neal spends time haunting thrift shops. “I use a lot of men’s shirts in my quilts,” she says. “A lot of them have wonderful striped patterns that I like.”
Ask about her favorite artists and she’s quick with one name – Rod Bearup, her husband, who is a talented metal sculptor in his own right. His works usually consist of metal, blown glass and enamel glass. “A lot of his work is pre-occupied with the natural world,” says Bearup-Neal. “Insects, birds, vegetation. It’s really wonderful work.”
She’s also a fan of Duncan Sprattmoran, a teacher at the Pathfinder School, whose landscapes have garnered national recognition.
Neal’s quilts were featured in a solo exhibition at Lake Street Studios in Glen Arbor in 2009. They’ve also been seen at Gallery 50 in Traverse City and ArtQuilt Elements, a juried exhibition at the Wayne Art Center in Wayne, PA.
They can currently be seen at the Cog’s Creek Gallery in Traverse City.
“We live in a world where things get put into neat little categories, like jail cells,” she says. “I think art needs to be fully integrated into the world we live in…I want my art to bring something into the home. It’s not so precious that it can’t be used in some way.”
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