Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Nocturnal Jazz A night of sight...
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Nocturnal Jazz A night of sight and sound at the Dennos

Erin Crowell - June 20th, 2011
Having grown up in California and experiencing the all-senses performance
of The Blue Oyster Cult and laser light show of Pink Floyd, Stosh — a
Traverse City artist who moved to the area in 1993 — knew firsthand that
an audience at a jazz concert could experience more than
just sound.
The result is “Nocturnal Jazz,” a 15 by 30-foot painting that has served
as the visual backdrop for nine concerts and 22 musicians over the past 14
years, including the upcoming Art of Classic Jazz Concert featuring Bob
James & Harry Goldson, at the Dennos Museum’s Milliken Auditorium in TC on
Saturday, June 25.
Inspired by Dexter Gordon’s jazz piece “Darn That Dream,” the painting
evolved from a skyline of Traverse City—containing all the notes
represented by lights from the song’s first line—to an entire cityscape,
with stacked skylines that contain the entire sheet of music.
“I like how it’s taken on a life of its own,” Stosh says, adding the
visual backdrop inspires a collective experience of music and art. “Most
of my work just hangs on the wall and the viewer has an internal
conversation.”

building bridges
In 1996, local jazz musician Jeff Haas had approached Stosh to see if he
would be interested in creating an art piece for his concert season
finale. Haas, along with the Northern Michigan Jazz Society, had started
the idea of combing art and music on stage as a way to build the bridge
between art forms.
The non-commissioned piece turned into a labor of love for Stosh, saying
he used his study of engineering to sketch and then rig the canvas to be
hung with steel bars and chains from the upstage rigging.
In regard to stage lighting, Stosh says he worked with it, rather than
against it, creating a piece that would evolve with the various lighting.
“I wanted the city’s mood to change when the music’s tempo changed. Warm
colors of stage lighting would make the city vibrant for upbeat tunes and
cool colored lighting for ballads would give the cityscape a melancholy
feel.”
The result has been an interactive concert experience that has musicians
and audience members both talking.
“I love the vibe of this work of art. Having grown up in Detroit, the
cityscape feels like home,” said Haas in a 1998 interview on performing in
front of Nocturnal Jazz. “My colleagues all agree, working with this piece
of art really inspires us. I feel like we, the cats on stage and in the
audience, get the best of both worlds ­ the vibe and inspiration of the
big city in the comfort and safety of Traverse City.”

SATURDAY’S PERFORMANCE
Audiences will also have the rare opportunity to experience the joint
performance of Bob James and Harry Goldson in Saturday’s classical jazz
concert. Both musicians discovered the genre five decades ago, since
performing with artists/ensembles such as Quincy Jones, Sarah Vaughn and
the Royal Chicagoans. James, a recipient of two Grammy awards, has
composition credits for several Broadway, film and TV shows. Goldson has
made several appearances with the Encore Winds and the Traverse Symphony
Orchestra.
They will be joined by jazz guitarist Howard Paul and
keyboard/percussionist Dave Hay. Tickets for the Milliken Auditorium show
are $30 in advance or $40 at the door. Show starts at 8 p.m. Visit
dennosmuseum.org.
 
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