Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Nocturnal Jazz A night of sight...
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Nocturnal Jazz A night of sight and sound at the Dennos

Erin Crowell - June 20th, 2011
Having grown up in California and experiencing the all-senses performance
of The Blue Oyster Cult and laser light show of Pink Floyd, Stosh — a
Traverse City artist who moved to the area in 1993 — knew firsthand that
an audience at a jazz concert could experience more than
just sound.
The result is “Nocturnal Jazz,” a 15 by 30-foot painting that has served
as the visual backdrop for nine concerts and 22 musicians over the past 14
years, including the upcoming Art of Classic Jazz Concert featuring Bob
James & Harry Goldson, at the Dennos Museum’s Milliken Auditorium in TC on
Saturday, June 25.
Inspired by Dexter Gordon’s jazz piece “Darn That Dream,” the painting
evolved from a skyline of Traverse City—containing all the notes
represented by lights from the song’s first line—to an entire cityscape,
with stacked skylines that contain the entire sheet of music.
“I like how it’s taken on a life of its own,” Stosh says, adding the
visual backdrop inspires a collective experience of music and art. “Most
of my work just hangs on the wall and the viewer has an internal
conversation.”

building bridges
In 1996, local jazz musician Jeff Haas had approached Stosh to see if he
would be interested in creating an art piece for his concert season
finale. Haas, along with the Northern Michigan Jazz Society, had started
the idea of combing art and music on stage as a way to build the bridge
between art forms.
The non-commissioned piece turned into a labor of love for Stosh, saying
he used his study of engineering to sketch and then rig the canvas to be
hung with steel bars and chains from the upstage rigging.
In regard to stage lighting, Stosh says he worked with it, rather than
against it, creating a piece that would evolve with the various lighting.
“I wanted the city’s mood to change when the music’s tempo changed. Warm
colors of stage lighting would make the city vibrant for upbeat tunes and
cool colored lighting for ballads would give the cityscape a melancholy
feel.”
The result has been an interactive concert experience that has musicians
and audience members both talking.
“I love the vibe of this work of art. Having grown up in Detroit, the
cityscape feels like home,” said Haas in a 1998 interview on performing in
front of Nocturnal Jazz. “My colleagues all agree, working with this piece
of art really inspires us. I feel like we, the cats on stage and in the
audience, get the best of both worlds ­ the vibe and inspiration of the
big city in the comfort and safety of Traverse City.”

SATURDAY’S PERFORMANCE
Audiences will also have the rare opportunity to experience the joint
performance of Bob James and Harry Goldson in Saturday’s classical jazz
concert. Both musicians discovered the genre five decades ago, since
performing with artists/ensembles such as Quincy Jones, Sarah Vaughn and
the Royal Chicagoans. James, a recipient of two Grammy awards, has
composition credits for several Broadway, film and TV shows. Goldson has
made several appearances with the Encore Winds and the Traverse Symphony
Orchestra.
They will be joined by jazz guitarist Howard Paul and
keyboard/percussionist Dave Hay. Tickets for the Milliken Auditorium show
are $30 in advance or $40 at the door. Show starts at 8 p.m. Visit
dennosmuseum.org.
 
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