Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Drained ... Brown Bridge Pond
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Drained ... Brown Bridge Pond

Mike Terrell - July 4th, 2011
Drained…It’s our last year to enjoy Brown Bridge Pond
By Mike Terrell
Brown Bridge Pond, the centerpiece for the Brown Bridge Quiet Area, has been with us for nearly a century, enjoyed by thousands of visitors over the years for paddling, fishing, and watching wildlife along its quiet hiking trails bordering the pond.
It was created when the dam was erected in 1921, but the dam is slated for deconstruction beginning next year. That will be the end of this delightful, scenic, wildlife area as we’ve known it. The pond is scheduled for a 13-foot interim drawdown beginning late this summer or early fall, which will expose nearly 100 acres of previously unexposed bottomlands.
I’m of mixed emotion. I will miss this wonderful natural area with its 191-acre pond and all the waterfowl and wildlife it plays host to. But, it will be exciting to see the river again flowing free through this valley both for fishing and paddling. The rapids created at the dam site will rival and may surpass the Beitner Rapids. This site had the greatest river fall of all the dam sites.
Steve Largent, head of Grand Traverse County’s Land Management Services, once said of the pond, “It’s like a little piece of northern Canada tucked away in northern Michigan.”

Other than the dam and landing area on the east side of the dam there aren’t any other signs of civilization, unless you count the three benches and two observation platforms located along the high bluff along the west side of the pond.
Recently I took off from the landing a little after 7 p.m. and spent a couple of hours just slowly paddling around the shoreline. It’s a little over a mile heading north up the pond to the point where the Boardman River enters. I figure the total paddle is around 2.5 miles, but distance isn’t the point anyway.
Taking the time to enjoy the setting is what is should be about. When you paddle the river from Forks Landing down to the dam it’s hard to enjoy what the pond has to offer. At the end of a river run you just want to get through the pond and the normally pesky wind that you have to paddle against.
I just enjoyed paddling around the pond that evening. There were a few other row boats out with fishing couples. Bass, pike, perch and bluegill are popular pursuits for the fishers.
Paddling up the west side of the pond underneath the bluff I could occasionally hear people talking from the two viewing platforms high above. Sound does carry over the water even from that high up.
The bottom disappears very quickly as you watch it plunge into the depths. Largent said this was where the original river ran before the dam was erected. The pond is probably about 30 to 40 feet deep along most of the bluff.

Reaching the northern end of the pond, where the river enters, I spotted a couple of deer coming down to the shoreline for a drink. Spotting me they darted back into the woods a little way, watching as I paddled on by.
An osprey flew over the marshlands along this end of the pond. He flew over the area a couple of times hunting for an evening snack.
At one point a head, which surprised me, something popped up next to one of the many submerged stumps along the bank. It was a large snapping turtle, and he didn’t stay up long. I could hear him sucking in air as he quickly disappeared again.
The nesting loons were on their nest, and had at least one chick in tow. I couldn’t tell if there were more, but the one was following the father around the nest in the water. The mother was setting on the nest. They were delightful to watch, and listening to that eerie, yodel-like call they make is always a treat.
After floating for a while in the vicinity of the nest having my own little private “Animal Planet” show, I paddled on towards the landing and was rewarded with being able to watch a trumpeter swan forage in the shallows with some chicks nearby. These large cream colored birds with their air-horn calls and black beaks are slowly making a comeback in the area, according to Largent.
If you hike north along the bluff trail to the most northern overlook platform you sometimes can spot an eagle’s nest on the opposite side of the pond high in a white pine tree. You need binoculars.
The lake-size pond runs southwest to northeast. The landing is located off Brown Bridge Road just north of the dam. The trails along the bluff are accessed by a couple of parking lots off Hobbs Highway about 12 miles southeast of Traverse City.
It’s a special place. Get out and enjoy it this summer, because by next summer it will likely be much different. Hiking trails won’t change along the bluff, just the scenery. But, you won’t be able to paddle it anymore, and much of the waterfowl will be gone.
It will be interesting observing the change. I wonder if they felt the same 90 years ago.
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