Letters

Letters 02-01-2016

Real Contamination In 1968, Chicago (its Mayor Richard Daley in particular) felt menaced by anti-war protesters (Abbie Hoffman in particular) threatening to put the hallucinogenic LSD into Chicago’s water supply. In reaction to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., we reacted vigorously to a perceived threat of chemical or biological terrorist attacks on our water supply. A religious cult contaminating a city water tank with salmonella in Oregon, sickening about 700, was the only such attack in our country until now. The water supply of Flint, Mich., was attacked and contaminated, not by terrorists or protesters, but by our own government...

Why The Muslim Debate? I was passing through your fine town last week and picked up a couple copies of Northern Express. There I noted a discourse concerning the Muslim situation in Dearborn. It is interesting to note that I see similar conversations in newspapers and blogs throughout the country and, in fact, throughout the world...

Kachadurian Has It All Wrong Thank you for continuing to publish Thomas Kachadurian’s bigoted editorials. If not for this publication, I wouldn’t know that such people lived in my sweet northern Michigan...

Over The Line I felt Sarah Palin crossed the line when she indicated our president did not care about those like her son who came home wounded. No one challenges her on these remarks; to me it is shameful...

Flints’ Man-made Disaster Governor Snyder’s Financial Emergency Manager Law has created a State of Emergency in Flint. In 2011, newly elected Governor Snyder signed Public Act 4, giving him the freedom to take over any city government his office found financially bankrupt, with power to override any decision of elected city officials. This law showed his primary motive — money before people. In November 2012, the People of Michigan voted down his Financial Emergency Manager Law, as they resented losing control of their cities. In December 2012, he showed his contempt for the people’s vote and signed a revised version, one that did not give power back to the people...

Defending the AR15 And Gun Rights I was amazed to read David Downer’s recent letter. He admits he is a gun owner but he expresses his ignorance of what an “assault rifle” really is, and thereby spreads the antigun position that an AR15 is an assault rifle...

Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play: Biosphere, Brendan Perry,...
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4Play: Biosphere, Brendan Perry, Blondie, Broken Bells

Kristi Kates - July 18th, 2011
 Biosphere - N-Plants - Touch
At once retro in its choices of synth sounds and beats, and modern in -
well, its choices of synth sounds and beats, Biosphere’s latest sticks to
his familiar sound while striking out into new, backwards-looking
territory. It is most definitely an album of contrasts. Opener “Hendai 1,”
a bit threatening-sounding, offers an intro that feels much like the
beginnings of a thriller or mystery movie, while its successor, “Shika 1,”
warms things up out of the fear factor zones with a more approachable
composition. Brimming with intensity, these tracks push one step beyond
ambient music and into something a little more pensive.

 
Brendan Perry - Ark -101
Former Dead Can Dance member Perry’s sophomore set, recorded at Perry’s
own home studio, finds the musician on a true solo mission of sorts, as he
wrote all of the songs here and performed all of the instruments himself.
The tracklisting extends that isolated approach, as Perry thinks and
performs his way through musings on life and personal growth, translated
through instruments both typical (guitars, keyboards) and somewhat
unexpected, given his electro/pop background (dulcimer?); and the
carefully-constructed lyrics on tunes like “The Devil and the Deep Blue
Sea” and “Utopia” show off Perry’s experience and craft.

 
Blondie - Panic of Girls - AIS
The legendary Debbie Harry and bandmates are back for yet another new set,
with their latest approach attacking solid refrains and radio-friendly
hooks head-on. A blend of electro-punk and some slightly misplaced reggae,
it’s successful for the most part, although the set may have served itself
better to focus on one sound/genre instead of the two. “Le Bleu,” with its
dual-language lyrics, and “D-Day” are catchy updates of the familiar
Blondie pop-punk sound, but tunes like “Girlie Girlie” drag on way too
long, time that would’ve better been spent expanding the more catchy “The
End, The End” or instant single “What I Heard.”


Broken Bells - Meyrin Fields - Columbia
Short (only four songs) but appealingly diverse, the Shins/Danger Mouse
side project serves as follow-up to their critically and fan-acclaimed
2010 debut, opening with “The Ghost Inside” B-side “Meyrin Fields” (hence
the album’s title), and shifting directly into the more rough,
suspenseful, and funky “Windows,” the tropicalia/synthy mix of “An Easy
Life,” and the more mainstream twisted electropop of “Heartless Empire,”
all of which serve to help define why these two skilled musicians work so
well together as a musical team. It’s artsy and concise, and a good look
forward at Broken Bells’ recordable future.
 
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