Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play: Biosphere, Brendan Perry,...
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4Play: Biosphere, Brendan Perry, Blondie, Broken Bells

Kristi Kates - July 18th, 2011
 Biosphere - N-Plants - Touch
At once retro in its choices of synth sounds and beats, and modern in -
well, its choices of synth sounds and beats, Biosphere’s latest sticks to
his familiar sound while striking out into new, backwards-looking
territory. It is most definitely an album of contrasts. Opener “Hendai 1,”
a bit threatening-sounding, offers an intro that feels much like the
beginnings of a thriller or mystery movie, while its successor, “Shika 1,”
warms things up out of the fear factor zones with a more approachable
composition. Brimming with intensity, these tracks push one step beyond
ambient music and into something a little more pensive.

 
Brendan Perry - Ark -101
Former Dead Can Dance member Perry’s sophomore set, recorded at Perry’s
own home studio, finds the musician on a true solo mission of sorts, as he
wrote all of the songs here and performed all of the instruments himself.
The tracklisting extends that isolated approach, as Perry thinks and
performs his way through musings on life and personal growth, translated
through instruments both typical (guitars, keyboards) and somewhat
unexpected, given his electro/pop background (dulcimer?); and the
carefully-constructed lyrics on tunes like “The Devil and the Deep Blue
Sea” and “Utopia” show off Perry’s experience and craft.

 
Blondie - Panic of Girls - AIS
The legendary Debbie Harry and bandmates are back for yet another new set,
with their latest approach attacking solid refrains and radio-friendly
hooks head-on. A blend of electro-punk and some slightly misplaced reggae,
it’s successful for the most part, although the set may have served itself
better to focus on one sound/genre instead of the two. “Le Bleu,” with its
dual-language lyrics, and “D-Day” are catchy updates of the familiar
Blondie pop-punk sound, but tunes like “Girlie Girlie” drag on way too
long, time that would’ve better been spent expanding the more catchy “The
End, The End” or instant single “What I Heard.”


Broken Bells - Meyrin Fields - Columbia
Short (only four songs) but appealingly diverse, the Shins/Danger Mouse
side project serves as follow-up to their critically and fan-acclaimed
2010 debut, opening with “The Ghost Inside” B-side “Meyrin Fields” (hence
the album’s title), and shifting directly into the more rough,
suspenseful, and funky “Windows,” the tropicalia/synthy mix of “An Easy
Life,” and the more mainstream twisted electropop of “Heartless Empire,”
all of which serve to help define why these two skilled musicians work so
well together as a musical team. It’s artsy and concise, and a good look
forward at Broken Bells’ recordable future.
 
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