Letters

Letters 04-25-2016

Taking Our Trees Seconds ago this pine tree was alive. Well, Mr. Cook — our County Road Commission head —and Peninsula Township government … by not weighing in (I guess it’s not your problem or responsibility to communicate with residents), you allowed the County Road Commission to bulldoze down huge swaths of lakeside trees in order to increase the bike lane. This can’t be happening. I have no clue why they would cut trees down that help block snow from creating drifts on Peninsula Drive and help keep the beach area intact. Plus, they are not increasing the width of the road when they repave. I just don’t get it. This is amateur hour at county and township government...

Government Service Unrewarded I served the federal government for XX years with the [agency], [doing XX]. I also worked in the private sector, [doing XX]. When I retired, I was surprised to learn my Social Security benefit would be $XXX less per month than my colleagues and neighbors who had never worked for the federal government. This is all because of the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) under the Social Security law...

Which Greased Palm Now that “Chicago values” have utterly corrupted the executive and judicial branches of our federal government, this November We the Plebeians shall either vote to right the governing integrity of the United States constitution’s twin pillars of limited government and separation of powers or turn and step collectively onto the blood soaked road to serfdom...

The Political Mess And Challenge As citizens we are faced with a real challenge. The media and the political candidates have taken over a year to attack those whom they are opposing. The unfavorable ratings of those who may be nominated are above 50 percent. That should be no surprise, considering the length of time given to bloodying one another with opinions that have little relationship to truth. The polling companies, which confess they are not reliable, make everything a game of winning...

CORRECTIONS In last week’s issue we had photos with the incorrect stories on page five. The dance photo should have accompanied the story about grants to nonprofits. The image of Crooked Tree Arts Center Petoskey should have accompanied the story about the ArtPrize exhibit at CTAC.

We also reported the incorrect day for the Bayshore Marathon in Traverse City. The correct date is Sat., May 28.

We apologize for these errors.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Double, Double?? Macbeth and A...
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Double, Double?? Macbeth and A MidSummer night?s Dream headline Lakeside Shakespeare

Erin Crowell - July 25th, 2011
‘Double, Double…’
Macbeth and A MidSummer night’s Dream headline Lakeside Shakespeare
By Erin Crowell
Like night and day, Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” and “A Midsummer Night’s
Dream” vary greatly in tone, from the dark and spooky to the light and
dreamy; however, the wooded venue of Forest Hill in Frankfort provides an
ideal setting for both—even a second character—as Lakeside Shakespeare
presents its eighth season of classic Shakespearean theatre July 28, 30
and Aug. 2 & 4 (for “Macbeth”) and July 29, 31 and Aug. 3 & 5 (for “A
Midsummer Night’s Dream”).
While there are many “Shakespeare in the Park” performances offered
throughout the region, Lakeside Shakespeare Theatre is a Midwest affair,
using professional actors, directors and designers from Chicago to bring
the poetic and, quite frankly, ambiguous world of Shakespeare to Northern
Michigan.
“Most people’s experiences with Shakespeare is something along the lines
of sophomore English class where you had to read a book and try to
translate the language,” said Elizabeth Laidlaw, LST founder and artistic
director. “When people see our shows they’ll say, ‘I had no idea! I always
thought Shakespeare was so boring’ and they love it because these plays
are meant to be played. It’s our job for you to come in completely cold
and have no idea about the meaning; but just enjoy the story.”
It will be the company’s second performance of “A Midsummer Night’s
Dream,” the story about fairies, Athenian craftsmen and dozing lovers in
an enchanted forest.
“We get something completely different this time around, which is a lot of
fun,” Laidlaw noted about the vision of director Scott Cummins for this
year’s production. “So for those who saw the first ‘Midsummer Night’s
Dream,’ it’ll bear no resemblance.”

ELEMENTAL WOOD
Another drastic change is the scenery, thanks to a location change last
year from Elberta Waterfront Park to the new space at Forest Hill—also
known as the Old Ice Rink.
“It offers a cool opportunity for both plays which have a magical element
coming out of the forest,” said Laidlaw. “In Macbeth, the witches are in
the woods that surround the old Scottish castle. You can’t provide a
better scenery than what nature has already provided.”
The trees also provide a cooler venue for audiences, guarding against the
direct light of the setting sun.
“Thankfully, we’ve never had any rain issues—knock on wood—but people know
they’ll be outside, so bring an umbrella, bug spray and remember to cover
your wine glass to keep the fruit flies out.”
Although both plays are free, Lakeside Shakespeare relies primarily on
donations – suggesting a $12 gift upon entry, although no one will be
turned away because they can’t afford it.
“We want everybody and anybody to come,” said Laidlaw, noting theatre
tickets in Chicago average around $45 – a real steal for professional
work.
“The actors are paid during the two weeks they’re up here, but they’re
also not making money,” added Laidlaw. “Most of them have second jobs; and
most survival jobs, like waiting tables, have flexibility for (the actors)
to leave for two weeks at a time but they don’t receive vacation pay.
Because of expenses, the amount of time Lakeside Shakespeare spends in
Northern Michigan is limited to just two weeks – that includes time on the
performance stage.
“We start rehearsing in a room in Chicago on June 13, so that’s six weeks
of rehearsal for two full-length productions with live music, sword
fighting and 13 actors playing 13 roles.”
During rehearsals, the actors have to just imagine the space in Frankfort
until “we get into that magical space that we don’t have a name for,” said
Laidlaw, acknowledging the moment the actors are there, it’s like
“releasing a lion.”

Lakeside Shakespeare returns to Forest Hill, in Frankfort, with “Macbeth”
on July 28, 30 and Aug. 2 & 4; and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” July 29,
31 and Aug. 3 & 5. All performances start at 7 p.m. There will also be a
Children’s Workshop for ages 5-12, August 2-4, from 10am-12pm at the
performance space. Admission is a suggested $12 donation per person.
Info: lakesideshakespeare.org.

 
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