Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Double, Double?? Macbeth and A...
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Double, Double?? Macbeth and A MidSummer night?s Dream headline Lakeside Shakespeare

Erin Crowell - July 25th, 2011
‘Double, Double…’
Macbeth and A MidSummer night’s Dream headline Lakeside Shakespeare
By Erin Crowell
Like night and day, Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” and “A Midsummer Night’s
Dream” vary greatly in tone, from the dark and spooky to the light and
dreamy; however, the wooded venue of Forest Hill in Frankfort provides an
ideal setting for both—even a second character—as Lakeside Shakespeare
presents its eighth season of classic Shakespearean theatre July 28, 30
and Aug. 2 & 4 (for “Macbeth”) and July 29, 31 and Aug. 3 & 5 (for “A
Midsummer Night’s Dream”).
While there are many “Shakespeare in the Park” performances offered
throughout the region, Lakeside Shakespeare Theatre is a Midwest affair,
using professional actors, directors and designers from Chicago to bring
the poetic and, quite frankly, ambiguous world of Shakespeare to Northern
Michigan.
“Most people’s experiences with Shakespeare is something along the lines
of sophomore English class where you had to read a book and try to
translate the language,” said Elizabeth Laidlaw, LST founder and artistic
director. “When people see our shows they’ll say, ‘I had no idea! I always
thought Shakespeare was so boring’ and they love it because these plays
are meant to be played. It’s our job for you to come in completely cold
and have no idea about the meaning; but just enjoy the story.”
It will be the company’s second performance of “A Midsummer Night’s
Dream,” the story about fairies, Athenian craftsmen and dozing lovers in
an enchanted forest.
“We get something completely different this time around, which is a lot of
fun,” Laidlaw noted about the vision of director Scott Cummins for this
year’s production. “So for those who saw the first ‘Midsummer Night’s
Dream,’ it’ll bear no resemblance.”

ELEMENTAL WOOD
Another drastic change is the scenery, thanks to a location change last
year from Elberta Waterfront Park to the new space at Forest Hill—also
known as the Old Ice Rink.
“It offers a cool opportunity for both plays which have a magical element
coming out of the forest,” said Laidlaw. “In Macbeth, the witches are in
the woods that surround the old Scottish castle. You can’t provide a
better scenery than what nature has already provided.”
The trees also provide a cooler venue for audiences, guarding against the
direct light of the setting sun.
“Thankfully, we’ve never had any rain issues—knock on wood—but people know
they’ll be outside, so bring an umbrella, bug spray and remember to cover
your wine glass to keep the fruit flies out.”
Although both plays are free, Lakeside Shakespeare relies primarily on
donations – suggesting a $12 gift upon entry, although no one will be
turned away because they can’t afford it.
“We want everybody and anybody to come,” said Laidlaw, noting theatre
tickets in Chicago average around $45 – a real steal for professional
work.
“The actors are paid during the two weeks they’re up here, but they’re
also not making money,” added Laidlaw. “Most of them have second jobs; and
most survival jobs, like waiting tables, have flexibility for (the actors)
to leave for two weeks at a time but they don’t receive vacation pay.
Because of expenses, the amount of time Lakeside Shakespeare spends in
Northern Michigan is limited to just two weeks – that includes time on the
performance stage.
“We start rehearsing in a room in Chicago on June 13, so that’s six weeks
of rehearsal for two full-length productions with live music, sword
fighting and 13 actors playing 13 roles.”
During rehearsals, the actors have to just imagine the space in Frankfort
until “we get into that magical space that we don’t have a name for,” said
Laidlaw, acknowledging the moment the actors are there, it’s like
“releasing a lion.”

Lakeside Shakespeare returns to Forest Hill, in Frankfort, with “Macbeth”
on July 28, 30 and Aug. 2 & 4; and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” July 29,
31 and Aug. 3 & 5. All performances start at 7 p.m. There will also be a
Children’s Workshop for ages 5-12, August 2-4, from 10am-12pm at the
performance space. Admission is a suggested $12 donation per person.
Info: lakesideshakespeare.org.

 
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