Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Double, Double?? Macbeth and A...
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Double, Double?? Macbeth and A MidSummer night?s Dream headline Lakeside Shakespeare

Erin Crowell - July 25th, 2011
‘Double, Double…’
Macbeth and A MidSummer night’s Dream headline Lakeside Shakespeare
By Erin Crowell
Like night and day, Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” and “A Midsummer Night’s
Dream” vary greatly in tone, from the dark and spooky to the light and
dreamy; however, the wooded venue of Forest Hill in Frankfort provides an
ideal setting for both—even a second character—as Lakeside Shakespeare
presents its eighth season of classic Shakespearean theatre July 28, 30
and Aug. 2 & 4 (for “Macbeth”) and July 29, 31 and Aug. 3 & 5 (for “A
Midsummer Night’s Dream”).
While there are many “Shakespeare in the Park” performances offered
throughout the region, Lakeside Shakespeare Theatre is a Midwest affair,
using professional actors, directors and designers from Chicago to bring
the poetic and, quite frankly, ambiguous world of Shakespeare to Northern
Michigan.
“Most people’s experiences with Shakespeare is something along the lines
of sophomore English class where you had to read a book and try to
translate the language,” said Elizabeth Laidlaw, LST founder and artistic
director. “When people see our shows they’ll say, ‘I had no idea! I always
thought Shakespeare was so boring’ and they love it because these plays
are meant to be played. It’s our job for you to come in completely cold
and have no idea about the meaning; but just enjoy the story.”
It will be the company’s second performance of “A Midsummer Night’s
Dream,” the story about fairies, Athenian craftsmen and dozing lovers in
an enchanted forest.
“We get something completely different this time around, which is a lot of
fun,” Laidlaw noted about the vision of director Scott Cummins for this
year’s production. “So for those who saw the first ‘Midsummer Night’s
Dream,’ it’ll bear no resemblance.”

ELEMENTAL WOOD
Another drastic change is the scenery, thanks to a location change last
year from Elberta Waterfront Park to the new space at Forest Hill—also
known as the Old Ice Rink.
“It offers a cool opportunity for both plays which have a magical element
coming out of the forest,” said Laidlaw. “In Macbeth, the witches are in
the woods that surround the old Scottish castle. You can’t provide a
better scenery than what nature has already provided.”
The trees also provide a cooler venue for audiences, guarding against the
direct light of the setting sun.
“Thankfully, we’ve never had any rain issues—knock on wood—but people know
they’ll be outside, so bring an umbrella, bug spray and remember to cover
your wine glass to keep the fruit flies out.”
Although both plays are free, Lakeside Shakespeare relies primarily on
donations – suggesting a $12 gift upon entry, although no one will be
turned away because they can’t afford it.
“We want everybody and anybody to come,” said Laidlaw, noting theatre
tickets in Chicago average around $45 – a real steal for professional
work.
“The actors are paid during the two weeks they’re up here, but they’re
also not making money,” added Laidlaw. “Most of them have second jobs; and
most survival jobs, like waiting tables, have flexibility for (the actors)
to leave for two weeks at a time but they don’t receive vacation pay.
Because of expenses, the amount of time Lakeside Shakespeare spends in
Northern Michigan is limited to just two weeks – that includes time on the
performance stage.
“We start rehearsing in a room in Chicago on June 13, so that’s six weeks
of rehearsal for two full-length productions with live music, sword
fighting and 13 actors playing 13 roles.”
During rehearsals, the actors have to just imagine the space in Frankfort
until “we get into that magical space that we don’t have a name for,” said
Laidlaw, acknowledging the moment the actors are there, it’s like
“releasing a lion.”

Lakeside Shakespeare returns to Forest Hill, in Frankfort, with “Macbeth”
on July 28, 30 and Aug. 2 & 4; and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” July 29,
31 and Aug. 3 & 5. All performances start at 7 p.m. There will also be a
Children’s Workshop for ages 5-12, August 2-4, from 10am-12pm at the
performance space. Admission is a suggested $12 donation per person.
Info: lakesideshakespeare.org.

 
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