Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Manchester Orchestra , Cold,...
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Manchester Orchestra , Cold, Alkaline Trio, Separation

Kristi Kates - July 25th, 2011
Manchester Orchestra - Simple Math - Columbia
Opening with a direct message to fans “Dear everybody/that has paid to see my band…,” Manchester Orchestra’s latest carefully places some more delicate instrumentals - specifically strings - on top of their stacks of heavy, dense guitars, a definite plus for the album’s overall sound and presence. “Mighty” is perhaps the best example of this musical juxtaposition, as is the even catchier “Pensacola” and the title track. Both guitars and violins quiet to complement each other well on “Leave It Alone,” while “Apprehension” shifts the focus to the track’s percussion, with strongly personal lyrics throughout the set.




Cold - Superfiction - Eleven Seven Music
Heavy alt-rock and carefully-crafted storytelling might seem like an unusual combination, but it’s one of the best descriptions of Cold’s latest album. Frontman Cold (aka Scooter Ward) helms his bandmates well throughout this set, which presents dark instrumentals, distressed guitars, and weighty beats together with a wide range of poetically-executed tales. “The Ballad of Nameless” adds pensive piano to this mix, while “Wicked World” amps up the distortion on the guitars, even as the vocals take the “pretty” route; “Flight of the Superstar” sets the stage for “… Nameless” to sweep in and wrap the set up perfectly.




Alkaline Trio - Damnesia - Epitaph
The Trio decided to celebrate their 15th anniversary as a band with this collection, which serves as a best-of collection of their works over the past 15 years, a showcase for three new songs, and a way for the band to have a little fun revamping some of their older songs as unplugged/acoustic numbers. The acoustic guitars add depth and focus to the band’s “Mercy Me” and “Calling All Skeletons,” and new acoustic-based track “I Remember a Rooftop” is a pretty musing by lovelorn Dan Andriano. Elsewhere, acoustic pianos are added in to “The American Scream” and “This Could Be Love.” It’s a varied set and an enjoyable listen for fans.


Separation - Balance and Composure - No Sleep Records
Take a less-funky, earlier Chili Peppers, throw in a little Cursive and Brand New, and you’ve got Separation’s under-the-radar alt-post-hardcore sound. Got that? “Void” begins the album’s tracklisting with unadorned guitars, but things get a lot more punk fairly quickly; lead single “Quake” harkens back to the mid-’90s with its up-n-down arrangement, “More To Me” deposits several layers of vocals, one on top of the next; and “Patience,” despite the title, sees the band getting more aggressive. There are some slower-tempo moments here worth hearing, as well, namely “Progress, Progress” and the midtempo “Stone Hands.”


 
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