Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Manchester Orchestra , Cold,...
. . . .

Manchester Orchestra , Cold, Alkaline Trio, Separation

Kristi Kates - July 25th, 2011
Manchester Orchestra - Simple Math - Columbia
Opening with a direct message to fans “Dear everybody/that has paid to see my band…,” Manchester Orchestra’s latest carefully places some more delicate instrumentals - specifically strings - on top of their stacks of heavy, dense guitars, a definite plus for the album’s overall sound and presence. “Mighty” is perhaps the best example of this musical juxtaposition, as is the even catchier “Pensacola” and the title track. Both guitars and violins quiet to complement each other well on “Leave It Alone,” while “Apprehension” shifts the focus to the track’s percussion, with strongly personal lyrics throughout the set.




Cold - Superfiction - Eleven Seven Music
Heavy alt-rock and carefully-crafted storytelling might seem like an unusual combination, but it’s one of the best descriptions of Cold’s latest album. Frontman Cold (aka Scooter Ward) helms his bandmates well throughout this set, which presents dark instrumentals, distressed guitars, and weighty beats together with a wide range of poetically-executed tales. “The Ballad of Nameless” adds pensive piano to this mix, while “Wicked World” amps up the distortion on the guitars, even as the vocals take the “pretty” route; “Flight of the Superstar” sets the stage for “… Nameless” to sweep in and wrap the set up perfectly.




Alkaline Trio - Damnesia - Epitaph
The Trio decided to celebrate their 15th anniversary as a band with this collection, which serves as a best-of collection of their works over the past 15 years, a showcase for three new songs, and a way for the band to have a little fun revamping some of their older songs as unplugged/acoustic numbers. The acoustic guitars add depth and focus to the band’s “Mercy Me” and “Calling All Skeletons,” and new acoustic-based track “I Remember a Rooftop” is a pretty musing by lovelorn Dan Andriano. Elsewhere, acoustic pianos are added in to “The American Scream” and “This Could Be Love.” It’s a varied set and an enjoyable listen for fans.


Separation - Balance and Composure - No Sleep Records
Take a less-funky, earlier Chili Peppers, throw in a little Cursive and Brand New, and you’ve got Separation’s under-the-radar alt-post-hardcore sound. Got that? “Void” begins the album’s tracklisting with unadorned guitars, but things get a lot more punk fairly quickly; lead single “Quake” harkens back to the mid-’90s with its up-n-down arrangement, “More To Me” deposits several layers of vocals, one on top of the next; and “Patience,” despite the title, sees the band getting more aggressive. There are some slower-tempo moments here worth hearing, as well, namely “Progress, Progress” and the midtempo “Stone Hands.”


 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close