Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Take me out to the ballgame
. . . .

Take me out to the ballgame

Erin Crowell - August 1st, 2011
The hurler stares down the striker – a young chap who, to the
inexperienced rooter, would appear a Muffin; but the hurler knows better.
He considers his options: should he toss a dew drop for an easy pop or
send one fast and hard to his behind for his gardeners?
He hurls it against the timber.
Smack!
It’s a cloud hunter, sailing to the garden where—the hurler is thankful to
see—a ready stonewall extend his hands.
“Leg it! Leg it!” the striker’s coots yell.
Is it a foul tick? An ace? A daisy cutter?
See for yourself at the Kilwins Fudge Bucket Classic Vintage Base Ball
Tournament, on August 6, featuring the rules, customs, lingo and uniforms
from the sport as it was played during the 1860s. Hosted by the Petoskey
Mossback Vintage Base Ball Club, the all-day event will take place
throughout Petoskey.

OLD SCHOOL
Like most sports today, baseball has been an evolutionary game – a bat and
ball activity with no exact date of origin. However, today’s version can
best be traced to 1845 when Alexander Cartwright and a group of other
young professionals formed the Knickerbocker Base Ball Club. The group
fashioned a standard set of rules and physical boundaries for the game
(such as foul territory and base distance), modeled much like the game of
cricket.
By 1850, more than a dozen base ball teams had formed in New York City and
by 1858, the National Association of Base-Ball Players was established.
It wouldn’t be until the mid 1980s that America would bring back the 19th
century game. This year marks just the third season for the Mossbacks
(named after the Civil War-era homebuilders who placed moss on their
roofs), but the roster of 15 men—with ages ranging from early 20s to late
50s—already has a long waiting list of locals wanting to get in on the
fun.

BRITTLE FINGERS
“I think it fills a recreational niche,” says Mossbacks co-captain, Matt
Berger. “It’s pretty laid back and although we like to win, it’s all about
having fun.”
A good time usually includes plenty of old fashion jabbing.
“But it’s also considered a gentlemen’s game,” says Berger. “The empire
can fine you at any time, up to a quarter, and make you apologize to the
crowd.”
The Mossbacks once owed 75 cents during a game.
“We call the other team ‘milk boys,’ ‘muffin’ or we’ll say ‘go throw on a
skirt’ if some guy catches a ball off the ground rather than in the air,”
laughs Berger, noting this form of base ball doesn’t use gloves, rather a
player must catch with his bare hands.
“We have a lot of broken fingers,” adds Berger. “We have one guy nicknamed
Brittle Fingers. He broke two fingers on his left hand last year and one
on his right this season.”
Nicknames are important, says Berger (a.k.a. Skip) – everybody has one. A
few Mossback names include Little T, The Count, Geezer, Einstein—“not
because he’s brilliant,” Berger laughs—Skillet Licker and Calvin & Hobbs
(two brothers on the team).

A DIFFERENT KIND OF GAME
Other differences between today’s baseball and 19th century base ball
(yes, spelled with two words prior to 1880) include the following: both
fair or foul balls caught off one bounce are considered out; balls that
bounce once in front of home plate before spinning into foul territory are
considered fair; and the pitcher’s primary job, aside from throwing the
ball underhand, is to simply put the ball into play.
And while the base-to-base dimensions have always been 90 feet apart, the
playing area can be anywhere from a standard diamond to a farmer’s field.
“The rougher, the better,” says Berger. “If there’s a cow or an outhouse
or a tree or whatever, you just play around it. It’s the closest thing to
sandlot baseball as a kid.”

The Kilwins Fudge Bucket Classic Vintage Base Ball Tournament will take
place at in Petoskey, on August 6. The winning team receives a bucket
of—you guessed it—Kilwin’s fudge. Opening ceremonies start at 10 a.m. in
Pennsylvania Park with the first round of games as follows: Regulars of
Mount Clemens versus the Rochester Grangers at Bay View, 11:30 a.m.;
Petoskey Mossbacks versus Kent City Base Ball Club at Petoskey Winter
Sports Park, 11:30 a.m. The event is free and open to the public. Visit
wix.com/mossback/baseballclub for more info.



 
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