Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Suicide Sonnet

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli - August 1st, 2011
Suicide Sonnet
A sheriff’s past revealed in Medieval Murders
Review: Medieval Murders
By Aaron Stander
Writers & Editors, LLC
$15.95
By Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli
Since reading the first book in the Ray Elkins series by Interlochen mystery writer, Aaron Stander, I’ve wondered about Ray. More than a capable sheriff in Cedar County, Michigan, Ray is quiet and caring and tenacious—but self-protective and slightly reluctant to open himself to anyone.
Ray’s a good cop. He always gets his man. He has eclectic tastes in music, literature and food (especially Stilton cheese), has good relationships with women, and is a thoroughly likeable man. But there was something more.
Now I understand.
Medieval Murders, the fifth in this popular Northern Michigan series, (after Summer People, Color Tour, Deer Season, and Shelf Ice) is a prequel to the other four books. It answers many questions about Ray: who he is, where he came from, and about the deep sorrow that darkened his life.

THE BACKSTORY
Before Ray came to live in Northern Michigan, before he became the sheriff of Cedar County and took on murderous snowplows and killers burrowed into shelf-ice caves, he was the Chair of the Criminal Justice Program at a midwestern university. Thereafter, he was talked into taking the post as interim director of the university police. You would think that a quiet gig. Drinking and drugging and mugging. Standard stuff at a university. But then Medievalists in the English Department begin to die. Ray is at his lowest. Ellen, his lover of many years, died a year ago and Ray’s suffering hasn’t lessened. “During Ellen’s last months he would wake, listen to her breathing, and wonder about the future. His despair had started long before she was gone.”
Not the first man to bury his sorrow in his work, Ray can’t let go of a campus death, a woman professor who leapt to her death from the carillon, a suicide: “An academic robe, luxurious folds of heavy black silk and rich blue velvet, covered the bird-like figure. A soft velvet hat with gold braid lay next to the crushed skull. Small streams of blood drained from the mouth and nose, forming a pool around the tassel.”

SUICIDE SONNET
A thoroughly detested person, Sheila Bensen was denied tenure. Angered beyond reason, she had quickly filed lawsuits and set about making herself unpopular among the faculty and students. But suicide? Ray isn’t convinced. And then another female professor of Medieval Studies comes up dead, this time with a suicide note that only such a woman would leave. A sonnet:
O me! What eyes hath Love put in my head,
Which have no correspondence with true sight;
Or, if they have, where is my judgment fled,
That censures falsely what they see aright?

And then another—in a fiery accident. This one has a reputation as a solid drinker, but then alcohol figures heavily with all the dead women.
Despite pressure from the administration to protect the university’s reputation from bad press and funding cuts by the state legislature and declare all the deaths suicides or accidents, Elkins won’t let go of what he senses lies beneath the deaths. He looks into every aspect of the women’s lives, searching for that one place where they intersected personally, and not letting go until—bit by bit—he assembles pieces of the puzzle. Secrets, lies, hatred, hypocrisy—they are all there at this seemingly quiet university.
Along with a fine character study and a good mystery, Stander, an academic himself, gives a fascinating look behind the scenes at university politics and problems besetting departments: “ …21 sections of Women’s Literature and 9 sections of African-American Literature and 5 of Hispanic Literature made it this term, but only 3 sections of Shakespeare.”
So, in addition to being killed off one by one, the Medievalists face a bleak and marginalized future. As with businesses facing downsizing, retooling, and change, the faculty is rife with jealousy, competition, and destructive human beings clinging to their jobs.
While Elkins is busy unmasking a killer, women around him have honed in, like bloodhounds, on his newly single status. At least one of the women has a novel twist on the old ‘casserole left on the porch’ routine, moving in on poor unaware Ray, offering herself and, when that doesn’t work, offering up other vestal virgins she stumbles upon.
Ray has his work cut out for him in Medieval Murders. As with the other novels in this series, there are things to learn and things to be shown and a murderer to unmask. All of this while showing Ray overcoming a past that, in Summer People and the others of the series, was only hinted at.

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli will sign and discuss her new mystery, Dead Dogs and Englishman on Wednesday, August 3, 1 pm, at McLean and Eakin Bookstore in Petoskey.







 
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