Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Paul Van Heest
. . . .

Paul Van Heest

Kristi Kates - August 1st, 2011
Motivated by a couple of politely persistent emails and a recommendation
from a print company, Kuhlhaus Gallery owner Tim Coon remembers first
discovering the artwork of Paul VanHeest.
“We go to Australia during the USA winters,” Coon recollects, “and while
we were there in the winter of 2009-2010, we got an email from Paul
suggesting we might wish to consider working with him, but I had no time
to respond. In March, he sent another email, this time mentioning that
Vada Print Company in Traverse City had recommended us to him. The second
email motivated me to look at Paul’s website, which immediately sold both
Helen (wife and gallery co-owner) and me.”

WHIMSICAL COLOR
VanHeest, who is also a 28-year veteran teacher of middle-school students,
works almost exclusively in colored pencil (with the occasional foray into
charcoal), crafting intricately detailed, whimsical drawings that often
focus on fanciful characters and unlikely scenarios.
“It’s difficult for me to pick out any one favorite of Paul’s works,
simply because so many of them are so cleverly humorous and so well
executed,” Coon says.
VanHeest’s “Globophobic Porcupine” depicts a colorful,
meticulously-rendered drawing of a porcupine who is afraid of balloons;
“Monkeyshines” shows a monkey holding a traffic light where each of the
“lights” are provided by a red, yellow, or green animal (parrots,
grasshoppers, lizards, frogs); and “Walking on Eggshells,” one of
VanHeest’s most popular works, depicts a rhinocerus with cement blocks
chained to his feet, carrying a heavy-set Chinaman on his back who is
holding a safe topped with three suitcases, a stool, a bowling ball, and a
monkey, all walking on eggs. The latter has been the winner of at least a
half-dozen awards in various exhibitions.

STYLISH HUMOR 
VanHeest’s works are appealing for a variety of reasons, Coon says.
Paul’s art is executed with great precision; is usually very colorful; is
chock-full of humor and whimsy; and usually - but not always - has an
underlying story. It is quite unlike anything we have ever seen before.”
Coon adds that one of the highlights of VanHeest’s exhibit will be the
opportunity to meet Paul himself on the day and evening of the exhibit
opening (Friday, August 5) and also during his stint as the gallery’s
“Artist in the Window” the following day, on which VanHeest will be
working “on display.”
   “Like Paul’s art, he is a stylish guy who is full of humor,” Coon says.
“He is the kind of middle-school art teacher we all would love to have
had.”

Paul VanHeest’s artwork will be on display at Kuhlhaus Art in Harbor
Springs (294 East Third Street, telephone 231-526-4204) beginning August
5. For more info on Mr. VanHeest, please visit www.paulvanheestart.com;
for more info on Kuhlhaus, visit them online at www.kuhlhausart.com. 
 
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