Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Sailing the Lakes on The Lynx
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Sailing the Lakes on The Lynx

Kristi Kates - August 15th, 2011
Sailing the Lakes on The Lynx
An 1812 privateer prowls the lake once again

By Kristi Kates

Built in 1812 in Fell’s Point, Maryland, the privateer Lynx was one of the first ships to defend American freedom in the War of 1812, and one of only 17 ships in the American Navy’s fleet.
The term privateer was given to the ships via a special permission, or “letter of marque,” which allowed private vessels to prey upon the enemy’s shipping. The Lynx, with its superior sailing abilities, was an inspiration to future ships in the fleet - but was captured early in the war.
Today’s privateer Lynx was inspired by that 1812 vessel, but was built starting in 1997 by Woodson K. Woods. His goal was to craft a ship that would educate the public through tours and sailings aboard the Lynx itself.
In 2001, the “new” Lynx was completed and launched in Rockport, Maine. Past and present met on July 28 of that year, and continues to this day with the Lynx’s sailings and tours.
“Lynx today continues to inspire,” says Jeffrey Woods, director of operations for the Lynx Educational Foundation, “Lynx sails as a living history museum dedicated to ‘those who cherish the blessings of America.’”

PIRATES TO PENNANTS
Lynx also helped inspire a few faux pirates for a while, too; the ship was the training ground for the cast and crew of the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie starring Johnny Depp.
Today’s ‘civilian’ Lynx visitors are treated to a crew garbed in period clothing and a ship bedecked with pennants and flags from the 1812 era. Even the carronades (short, cast iron cannons) and swivel guns are authentic.
“Weaponry aboard Lynx are fitted with period ordnance, which is not too common to find on tall ships,” Woods explains.
Woods, who hires the crew to operate the ship, arranges port visits, handles the marketing and fundraising, and also oversees all of the ships’ operations, says that the Lynx harkens back to a different time.
“I think what attracts people to Lynx the most is that on decks and below, Lynx evokes the life, spirit, and atmosphere of a vanished age of sail,” he says, “Her deck guns are also always an interest to those who step aboard.”

FIVE YEAR MISSION
Several opportunities to step aboard will be available when the Lynx docks in Bay Harbor. Visitors can choose from a dockside tour, an “Adventure Sail,” or a “Sunset Sail,” all of which are sure to transmit a good feel for what it must have been like to work and live on a ship like the Lynx.
The Lynx travels year-round, and has been in Northern Michigan before (in Harbor Springs and Frankfort); the ship will be spending the next several years in transit to educate and, as Woods puts it, “to remind Americans of their proud heritage.”
“Having come around from Hawaii and California through the Panama Canal in 2009, Lynx is here on a five-year mission along the East Coast of the United States, the Great Lakes, and Canada to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812,” Woods says.
“Sailing in the Great Lakes has been terrific,” he continues, “there has been such tremendous support and interest in the ports we have visited. It is amazing to have sailed through all the fresh water lakes and support the effort to preserve them. Also Lynx herself enjoys the fact that we do not have to clean the bottom of the boat as there is little growth because of the fresh water. It has been a wonderful feeling for our crew to see so many people come down to see the ship and have so much appreciation for what we do.”

The Privateer Lynx will be visiting Bay Harbor from August 19 through August 28. For more information on the ship and tickets for its tours/sailings, visit them online at www.privateerlynx.com. The Lynx Educational Foundation always welcomes donations at 1-888-446-5969.


 
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