Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Sailing the Lakes on The Lynx
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Sailing the Lakes on The Lynx

Kristi Kates - August 15th, 2011
Sailing the Lakes on The Lynx
An 1812 privateer prowls the lake once again

By Kristi Kates

Built in 1812 in Fell’s Point, Maryland, the privateer Lynx was one of the first ships to defend American freedom in the War of 1812, and one of only 17 ships in the American Navy’s fleet.
The term privateer was given to the ships via a special permission, or “letter of marque,” which allowed private vessels to prey upon the enemy’s shipping. The Lynx, with its superior sailing abilities, was an inspiration to future ships in the fleet - but was captured early in the war.
Today’s privateer Lynx was inspired by that 1812 vessel, but was built starting in 1997 by Woodson K. Woods. His goal was to craft a ship that would educate the public through tours and sailings aboard the Lynx itself.
In 2001, the “new” Lynx was completed and launched in Rockport, Maine. Past and present met on July 28 of that year, and continues to this day with the Lynx’s sailings and tours.
“Lynx today continues to inspire,” says Jeffrey Woods, director of operations for the Lynx Educational Foundation, “Lynx sails as a living history museum dedicated to ‘those who cherish the blessings of America.’”

Lynx also helped inspire a few faux pirates for a while, too; the ship was the training ground for the cast and crew of the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie starring Johnny Depp.
Today’s ‘civilian’ Lynx visitors are treated to a crew garbed in period clothing and a ship bedecked with pennants and flags from the 1812 era. Even the carronades (short, cast iron cannons) and swivel guns are authentic.
“Weaponry aboard Lynx are fitted with period ordnance, which is not too common to find on tall ships,” Woods explains.
Woods, who hires the crew to operate the ship, arranges port visits, handles the marketing and fundraising, and also oversees all of the ships’ operations, says that the Lynx harkens back to a different time.
“I think what attracts people to Lynx the most is that on decks and below, Lynx evokes the life, spirit, and atmosphere of a vanished age of sail,” he says, “Her deck guns are also always an interest to those who step aboard.”

Several opportunities to step aboard will be available when the Lynx docks in Bay Harbor. Visitors can choose from a dockside tour, an “Adventure Sail,” or a “Sunset Sail,” all of which are sure to transmit a good feel for what it must have been like to work and live on a ship like the Lynx.
The Lynx travels year-round, and has been in Northern Michigan before (in Harbor Springs and Frankfort); the ship will be spending the next several years in transit to educate and, as Woods puts it, “to remind Americans of their proud heritage.”
“Having come around from Hawaii and California through the Panama Canal in 2009, Lynx is here on a five-year mission along the East Coast of the United States, the Great Lakes, and Canada to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812,” Woods says.
“Sailing in the Great Lakes has been terrific,” he continues, “there has been such tremendous support and interest in the ports we have visited. It is amazing to have sailed through all the fresh water lakes and support the effort to preserve them. Also Lynx herself enjoys the fact that we do not have to clean the bottom of the boat as there is little growth because of the fresh water. It has been a wonderful feeling for our crew to see so many people come down to see the ship and have so much appreciation for what we do.”

The Privateer Lynx will be visiting Bay Harbor from August 19 through August 28. For more information on the ship and tickets for its tours/sailings, visit them online at www.privateerlynx.com. The Lynx Educational Foundation always welcomes donations at 1-888-446-5969.

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