Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Features · TC business has fishing in its...
. . . .

TC business has fishing in its blood

Patrick Sullivan - August 22nd, 2011
TC business has fishing in its blood
By Patrick Sullivan

Roger Borgeson had been retired for six years, but he missed the tackle
business, the line of work he’d been in for a half century.
He’d been sidelined by illness, could no longer fish, and he wanted to
find his way back.
“Basically I got sick and I couldn’t work anymore and I can’t stand
retirement,” Borgeson said. “The boys came to me, Mike and Pat, and said,
‘Let’s get into the lure business.’”
For the past four years, Borgeson, along with his stepsons Mike and Pat
Steffes, have run Warrior Lures, a Traverse City-based fishing lure
company.
“I never wanted to retire, I love the business, the people in it,” he
said. “Most people that get into this business are the same way -- it
isn’t a job. It’s more like a love affair.”

AMERICAN MADE
One reason Borgenson wanted to get into the manufacturing end of the
business was to be able to produce an American-made lure.
“I’ve seen it come and I’ve seen it go,” he said. “Nowadays, the fishing
tackle industry is very, very small here in the U.S.”
He’d spent his career as a manufacturer’s rep for tackle companies and he
watched the domestic industry decimated by foreign competition,
particularly from Japan.
He thought with his knowledge of the business he could succeed where
others failed.
“Our whole deal was to manufacture here,” Borgenson said. “A lot of guys
get into this business with no knowledge of the business. A lot of guys
just like to fish and just get into the business.”
Borgeson’s stepsons, Mike and Pat, also have fishing tackle in their blood.
Their uncle is John Emory, the brother of Borgeson’s wife, Sharron. Emory
is a salmon fishing legend, a fishing gear inventor and the founder of Big
Jon’s Sports, a downrigger manufacturer he sold several years ago.
At Warrior Lures, a division of M & P Sporting Products, LLC, Mike works
on the business end of things and Pat hand paints the lures.
The company does sales in the six figures but no one makes a salary yet,
Borgeson said. Everything goes back into the business.
“It’s a matter, in our case, of how much money we are able to put into raw
materials,” he said. “We haven’t had any problem selling our product
because we know the customer.”

NEW DESIGN
Borgenson said theirs was the first lure company in decades to introduce a
lure made from a magnum die of an original design.
He said he didn’t like what was on the market when they started the company.
“We knew the action on them wasn’t proper on those spoons,” he said.
On their lures, the spoon is deeper, which Borgeson says makes it travel
through the water better, mimicking fish movement at a wider variety of
speeds.
Warrior Lures are sold at some Bass Pro Shops and Gander Mountain outlets.
Next year they hope to expand to more Bass Pro locations and Cabela’s.
Some may use Warrior Lures in the upcoming Salmon Classic in Traverse City.
But that sort of thing isn’t for Borgeson anymore. And there’s no
guarantee that using the Warrior Lures will bring victory.
Due to his illness, he hasn’t fished in years. While he would still love
to fish, he’s no longer interested in tournaments.
Borgeson entered the Salmon Classic in its first year, in 1991, and he
hasn’t been back since.
“Guys that win tournaments spend a lot of time fishing. Anyone that tells
you you can win a tournament just out of the box has never won a
tournament,” Borgeson said. “It’s hard work.”

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close