Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · High 5
. . . .

High 5

Erin Crowell - August 22nd, 2011

High Five to the Hand: It’s ‘all Michigan’all the time for 3 entrepreneurs
By Erin Crowell
In Michigan, we know how to use our hands – from hard labor and sipping
local spirits to geographically showing our location; yes, if you’re a
Michigander, at one point you’ve probably thrown up that palm for an
out-of-stater and pointed (whether a wrinkle or pinky) to where you live.
Thanks to its shape, Michigan is the hardest U.S. state to draw but likely
the most identifiable.
It’s this identification that is the idea behind High Five Threads, a
product line celebrating not only Michigan’s unique shape, but its
culture.
“We want to show Michigan is more than just backwoods cottages,” said
Byron Pettigrew, one of three owners of the Traverse City-based store
which sells all-Michigan products. Located in the Village of the Grand
Traverse Commons, High Five Threads will host its grand opening on
Thursday, Aug. 25, from 5-7 p.m.
HIGH FIVE
The company’s most popular product includes its t-shirts printed on Bella
& Canvas Brand cotton, which uses an athletic-style cut.
Such designs include the High Five Threads logo, a hand drawn in place of
the Lower Peninsula; “Vinted in” and “Brewed in” with the outline of the
Lower Peninsula shaped as a wine and beer glass, respectively; the
DueceThirtyOne, our region’s response to Detroit’s 313 and 616 branded
shirts; and the very popular “Keep It Fresh” lake print—a Great Lakes-only
rendering celebrating the natural beauty that surrounds us, as well as
what makes the outline of the state stand out.
“We practically sold out of shirts within our first week and a half of
opening,” said Brad Kula, who deals with the marketing and business end of
the company.
Other products include the High Five Threads logo vinyl decal, glassware,
Fishtown coffee, homemade treats from Traverse City’s D.O.G. bakery and a
Michigan-shaped (Lower and Upper Peninsula represented) ice cube tray,
which was designed and manufactured entirely in Michigan.
Materials and assembly for the tray are represented in Howell,
Chesterfield, Shelby Township, St. Clair Shores, Harrison Township,
Midland and Clarkston.
Lance Hill, the company’s “chief creator” of design (as he puts it,
laughing), has created all the logos and rendering of High Five’s
products, save the “Awesome Mitten” and “Detroit Hustles Harder” designs.

THE COMPANY
Before the trio graduated from Kalkaska High School in 2004, Hill and
Pettigrew were already operating a part-time business; Sound Bytes—an
entertainment and DJ service for private parties and corporate events they
started at age 15—still exists today (check them out at
soundbytesdjs.com).
In 2010, Pettigrew, Hill and Kula launched their marketing and design
company, Lit Image, which helps clients do everything from graphic design
and branding to photography and event planning.
The online company met most of their clients face-to-face at the Grand
Traverse Commons, so when the opportunity presented itself to snag some
retail space in the building, the three believed a move there seemed the
most logical step.
The small space serves as both a store and headquarters for their multiple
businesses –- with plans to expand their product line into sweatshirts,
hats and other clothing, according to Hill.
There’s no argument that these 24-year-olds, each a month apart, have the
business savvy and overall drive to see a vision through to a profitable
endeavor. However, their drive is more than just about doing business –
it’s about helping Michigan, and the people who live here, make a name for
themselves.
“When we were in high school, practically everyone wanted to leave the
state,” said Pettigrew. “We want to show this generation that Michigan is
actually a really cool place to be.”
High five to that, man!

 
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