Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Doggone shame
. . . .

Doggone shame

Erin Crowell - June 6th, 2011
Doggone Shame: Cherryland Humane Society in danger of closing
By Erin Crowell
“The community has always rallied behind us and I know it will happen this
time around,” Sue Schwartz said over the echo of barking dogs at the
Cherryland Humane Society (CHS). The volunteer remains optimistic after
Mike Cherry, CHS executive director along with CHS president Jess Reed,
announced last week that unless the 501(c)(3) nonprofit can raise $20,000
as early as June 15, it will be forced to shut down operations.
Cherry and Reed hosted a press conference on Wednesday, less than a week
after CHS sent a mass mailing out to the community, asking for financial
help that would cover the $200,000 annual budget.
Cherry attributes a troubled economy, an increase in cost of
operations—such as pet food, medicine, supplies and care, utilities and
cleaning agents—and historically low donations from substantial annual
contributors as factors to the budget shortfall.
“The CHS is dependent on donations for its very existence,” Cherry said.
“Often animal charities are on the lower end of the giving scale,” adding
CHS received only 60% of the expected total funds from annual donors in
2010.

RECORD INCREASE
Established July 1956, the CHS provides over 25 programs dedicated to spay
and neuter awareness, pet education and homeless dog and cat adoption,
among other services in the Grand Traverse region.
Last year, CHS found homes for 596 puppies and dogs; and 556 kittens and
cats.
“Last week we had 18 dogs adopted,” Schwartz said.
Because of the shape of the economy, including job loss and foreclosures,
CHS has seen a record increase in animals coming to the shelter, according
to Reed.
“People will come to us crying because they can’t find an apartment that
will allow dogs or they just can’t afford to keep their pet,” Schwartz
sympathizes.
While surrounding shelters and humane societies such as Benzie, Charlevoix
and Petoskey would likely see an increase in unwanted cats and dogs if CHS
were to close, Reed said he fears what may happen if individuals had to
travel so far to take care of an unwanted pet.
“Responsible people will find another shelter to take their animal,” Reed
said. “What we’re concerned with is some of the less responsible animal
owners who are not inclined to go the extra mile. At that point we’re
concerned about animal abandonment, cruelty and improper euthanasia.”

ALWAYS IN NEED
Located just south of Traverse City near the Rogers Observatory, the
Cherryland Humane Society moved into its current home in July 2002. The
14,000 square foot facility boasts two separate dog kennel wings, a cat
adoption center, examination room, grooming room and pet/adopter
interaction rooms. Along with a $350 per day shortfall, CHS is always in
need of a variety of items including washable cat and dog toys, blankets,
rugs, cleaning supplies, cat and dog food, kitty litter and laundry
detergent.

For more information on how to donate to the Cherryland Humane Society,
call them at 231-946-5116 or visit cherrylandhumane.org. CHS is located at
1750 Ahlberg Road, Traverse City, MI 49696.
 
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