Letters

Letters 08-01-2016

Voter Suppression And Choice In 2013, five Supreme Court justices, each appointed by Republican presidents, knocked the teeth out of the Voting Rights Act. Immediately a majority of Republican-dominated states began passing laws aimed at suppressing the votes of their majority Democrat demographics: minorities, students and the elderly. These laws – requiring voter IDs, cutting early voting, eliminating same-day registration, closing selected polling places, banning straight-ticket voting, etc. — never flat-out deny a person’s right to vote; they just make actual registering and voting more difficult, and therefore make it more likely that individuals in certain groups will not vote. Think of voter suppression as a kind of reverse marketing strategy, one aimed at getting people not to do something...

Free Parking Patrick Sullivan’s good story on parking overlooked one source of “free parking” that has become an increasing problem in Traverse City: spill-over into adjacent neighborhoods. Instead of discouraging people from bringing cars downtown, we’re allowing them to park on both sides of narrow residential streets all day long...

Real American Duality Isiah Smith didn’t really put his deep thinking hat on before writing the “American Duality” commentary. First there’s geography. His daughter feels safer in Sweden than in the United States, at least partially because of the violence in Dallas, Baton Rouge and Minnesota. Really? Safer than in northern Michigan, which is further away from Dallas and Baton Rouge than Stockholm is from Ansbach, Paris or Brussels and no closer to Minnesota than Sweden is to Germany? Did Smith miss recent supremely violent events in those places? Alrighty then...

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Saturday, July 23, 2016

American Duality

Other Opinions Isiah Smith When she was seventeen, my daughter moved to Europe. She has been there almost continually for the last twenty-two years, so most of her adult life has been spent in Europe. In a sense, she’s more European than American.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

The Saddest Conventioneer

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle It gave us some interesting television. Now it gives us an hour or so of prime time boredom and nothing more entertaining than plagiarism. We don’t even get coverage of the arcane business of creating a party platform, a process akin to sausage making. Of course, the platform will be largely ignored before being forgotten entirely.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

Dates 07-23-2016

Dates Jamie Kauffold The 69th Annual AuSable River Canoe Marathon takes place July 26-31. This non-stop canoe race starts at night with a LeMans-style running-start to the river in Grayling, & ends 120 miles later near the shores of Lake Huron in Oscoda. It is the middle leg of the Triple Crown of Canoe Racing.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

Letters 07-25-2016

Letters

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

Spotlight Shines On MSU at Traverse City Film Festival

Features As the main educational sponsor for TCFF, Michigan State University is ushering in the next generation of creative talent, partnering with the festival to offer a dazzling array of student-produced films, filmmaking classes, an interactive multimedia gallery, and a special Spartan Headquarters open to the public.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

Free Parking?

Features Patrick Sullivan Take an experiment in June, when the city proposed a pop-up park at Lot O, at the corner of State and Cass streets. Intended as a three-day dry run for a theoretical city square, the pop-up park sparked impassioned debate over whether space in the city should be reserved for parking or could be used for other activities.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

The Pointer Returns

Features Kristi Kates Constructed in Chassell, Mich., in 1934, the low-slung wooden water vessel known as The Pointer has been a longtime icon of Harbor Springs. It first served as a water taxi to tony Harbor Point, then later retired to the backyard bay waters outside Stafford’s Pier restaurant on Bay Street.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

Parking Is A Problem

Features Patrick Sullivan From Petoskey to Frankfort, towns that attract tourists are dealing with the same conundrum: How do you make sure parking is available for visitors when they arrive? How do you encourage more people to bike or walk into town? How do you get employees to park in satellite lots?.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

Changing Lives On The Red Dirt Road

Features Kristi Kates “Laura introduced me to [physicist/novelist/educator] Alan Lightman and his Harpswell Organization,” Eckstein said. “He was taking a trip to Cambodia to check on his work there and invited me to meet him there to see what he does with his foundation to empower women.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

History is Stored in Horton Bay

Features Kristi Kates After moving up to Horton Bay from Traverse City 35 years ago to open a deli in Boyne City, the Lorengers were drawn to the uniqueness of the general store, built in 1876. They purchased it in 2000, prepared to take on the renovations that the store badly needed.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

Life in the Past Lane

Features Kristi Kates Deb Matthew is a charter life member of the Northern Michigan Antique Flywheelers Club. Her commitment to the club isn’t simply because she’s a fan of tractors, engines and other farming mechanics. Her parents, Larry and Darlea Matthew, founded the club back in the 1980s.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

Catch Me If You Can Hits Interlochen Stage

Features Kristi Kates While we won’t spoil the ending for you, the penultimate scene of Steven Spielberg’s movie Catch Me If You Can is the opener, where protagonist Frank Abagnale Jr. (Leonardo Di- Caprio) is a contestant on the old game show To Tell The Truth.
 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

See the Future at the Woz

Features Kristi Kates Started three years ago, The Woz — inspired by and named for Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak — already has grown by leaps and bounds, said TCFF Creative Director Meg Weichman.
 
Saturday, July 16, 2016

The Rhythms Of Upbeat Cadillac

Music Kristi Kates Not surprisingly, it was music that brought them together. Calhoun, born in Mississippi in 1921 and raised in Chicago, had a long and illustrious career, performing with the likes of Erroll Garner, Miles Davis, Lennie Capp, and Ahmad Jamal. He, like many other black musicians of his era, spent time at northern Michigan’s Idlewild resort community.
 
Saturday, July 16, 2016

A Vivid Life

Art Al Parker “At first, people sort of trickled in, and we spent time getting the inventory built up, but the pace is picking up nicely now,” said the Illinois native who moved to Traverse City in 2013. Hollenbeck’s paintings, as well as the color pencil drawings and ceramics by her husband, Arnie, fill much of the gallery.
 
 
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