Letters

Letters 04-14-14

Benishek Inching

Regarding “Benishek No Environmentalist” I agree with Mr. Powell’s letter to the editor/ opinion of Congressman Dan Benishek’s poor environmental record and his penchant for putting corporate interests ahead of his constituents’...

Climate Change Warning

Currently there are three assaults on climate change. The first is on the integrity of the scientists who support human activity in climate change. Second is that humans are not capable of affecting the climate...

Fed Up About Roads

It has gotten to the point where I cringe when I have to drive around this area. There are areas in Traverse City that look like a war zone. When you have to spend more time viewing potholes instead on concentrating on the road, accidents are bound to happen...

Don’t Blame the IRS

I have not heard much about the reason for the IRS getting itself entangled with the scrutiny of certain conservative 501(c) groups (not for profit) seeking tax exemption. Groups seeking tax relief must be organizations that are operated “primarily for the purpose of bringing about civic betterment and social improvements.”


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Features

 
Monday, September 19, 2011

Horizon Books

50 Years of Anchoring Traverse City

Features Rick Coates “Considering we host more than 1,000 events a year, most people might not even realize we are having a special celebration going on,” said Amy Reynolds, who coowns the store with her husband, Vic Herman. “The balloons might tip them off and we will have more events going on than we typically do in a given day.
 
Monday, September 5, 2011

The 231 Project Photographer captures women of the 231 area code

Features Rick Coates Sarah Armstrong hurries home after work and grabs her camera bag and heads
out the door for her next shoot. A media consultant by day and
photographer by night, Armstrong is on a mission to photograph 231 women
from Northern Michigan for a new book and social media project.
Armstrong is not looking for societal supermodels for her project, just
women who who want to express their beauty regardless of size, shape or
age.
 
Monday, September 5, 2011

Public Safety

Features Patrick Sullivan MAN STABS SELF
A 50-year-old man who told police he was stabbed by robbers actually stabbed himself to cover up gambling losses.
The man first reported that he’d been stabbed and his wallet robbed as he walked on Eighth Street in TC at around 2:15 a.m. Sept. 2.
Police later learned the man stabbed himself in the abdomen because he didn’t want to tell his family he’d just lost over $1,000 at a casino, TC Police Capt. Brian Heffner said.
 
Monday, September 5, 2011

The Man Who Fell to Earth

Features Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli The man, Pasquale Buzzelli, called me because he heard I wrote books. He
needed help getting his story down on paper. His name was the same as
mine—Buzzelli. Unusual, even as Italian surnames go. Coincidence, the
man said and we agreed to meet in New York City where I would listen to
what happened to him on September 11, 2001.
 
Monday, September 5, 2011

Derek Bailey on Tribal Progress

Features Rick Coates It was just seven years ago that Derek Bailey started work on a Ph.D
program at Central Michigan University when he felt that he could best
serve the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians by serving on
the Tribal Council.
Bailey left school and successfully won a seat on the board. It wasn’t
long before he was elected the youngest tribal chairman of the Grand
Traverse Band (GTB) since its reorganization in 1980.
 
Monday, September 5, 2011

Reflecting Absence

Features Patrick Sullivan When the National September 11 Memorial is unveiled in New York City this
week, a Traverse City grad will get to show off his work.
Robert Jamieson grew up in TC and went to high school here. But he has
spent his professional life on the East Coast. Jamieson currently lives in
Philadelphia where he is head of store design for the upscale retailer
Anthropologie.
 
Monday, September 5, 2011

Reflections of 9/11: Area citizens recall the attack on America

Features Erin Crowell I was 17 years old in my high school drama class, blindfolded and
awkwardly navigating the auditorium by voice of a classmate. It was one of
many activities created by our teacher meant to exercise communication,
reliance and the hope our partner wouldn’t lead us into a chair or brick
wall.
Blind trust, I like to call it today.
 
Monday, August 29, 2011

Saviors of the Switchboard

Features Erin Crowell Saviors of the Switchboard
It’s a cool, sunny Monday afternoon in August. The work gears are primed again as folks settle back into the 9-to-5 pace, taking a half hour for lunch, running errands and finishing projects left on-hold for the weekend.
Above the hustle, overlooking the Boardman River in a room bathed in darkness, the gears have never stopped for a group of people known as Central Dispatch, the consolidated emergency services answering point responsible for handling requests for law enforcement, fire and EMS agencies for the entire Grand Traverse County.
Whether it’s a fire, car accident or an emergency at home, every call to 9-1-1 in the county is directed to this room on the third level of the Governmental Center – an average of 125,000 total calls each year.
 
Monday, August 29, 2011

Public Safety

Features Patrick Sullivan ROCK THROWN AT COP
A Grand Traverse County Sheriff’s deputy who was driving down High Lake
Road near Supply Road was surprised by an object that was apparently
thrown from another vehicle and struck his windshield.
The deputy turned around, stopped the vehicle and interviewed the
occupants of the car after the incident, which happened after midnight on
Aug. 23.
A 19-year-old backseat passenger first told police that he threw a piece
of candy out of the window, Capt. Randy Fewless said. He later admitted to
throwing a rock at the marked patrol car, and he added that he did not
realize the car was a police car when he threw the rock.
The teenager was arrested on a charge of throwing an object at a vehicle.
The windshield needed to be replaced, Fewless said.
 
Monday, August 29, 2011

20 Years of Celebrating Nature: Raven Hill Discovery Center

Features Kristi Kates It‘s difficult to believe that Raven Hill Discovery Center has been around for 20 years. The Center in East Jordan is one of those places intrinsic to Northern Michigan; it just seems like it‘s always been there, yet it manages to stay fresh and find new ways to introduce visitors to new discoveries.
Celebrating their 20th anniversary this year, co-founder Cheri Leach (with Tim Leach) explains how Raven Hill Discovery Center has evolved.
 
Monday, August 29, 2011

Up in Smoke Court ruling puts pot purveyors out of business

Features Patrick Sullivan Owners of medical marijuana collectives decided not to wait for the police to knock on their doors following last week’s court decision that, for now, puts an end to legal patient-to-patient sales of pot.
“We’re just telling (our customers) that due to the recent government ruling, we’ve been advised by our attorney not to be transferring medicine period,” said Steve Ezell, an employee at the Collective, a marijuana shop on State Street in TC.
Pot shops across the state are in jeopardy after the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled Aug. 24 in favor of prosecutors in an Isabella County case and said the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act does not legalize the sale of marijuana for profit.
TC Police said they would look into the business practices at marijuana shops, but before they could, shops across town apparently closed.
That put around a dozen employees at the Collective out of work and left around 1,500 members who have a doctor’s prescription to use marijuana without a source for the drug.
The court ruling determined that the businesses are public nuisances and violate the state public health code, which is meant to protect citizens from hazards.
Ezell said he didn’t think the business he worked at ever posed a threat to the public. It opened last November.
“You’ll have to check with the Traverse City police, but I’m confident that there’s been zero incidents involving the Collective,” Ezell said.
 
Monday, August 29, 2011

Lost in the Mail : Teacher who tried to ship car from California winds up riding a bicycle

Features Patrick Sullivan David Allen knew trying to have his car shipped to Northern Michigan from California was going to be expensive and a big hassle.
Little did he know it would be a hassle he would still be dealing with eight months later.
Last December the history and political science teacher attempted to have his white 2006 Nissan Altima shipped from Los Angeles to his new home in Interlochen, where he had taken a teaching position a few months earlier.
“The plan was for me to get my car and go home and see my family for the holidays,” said Allen, a Boston native whose family still lives in Massachusetts.
Allen looked online and found a company called Tristar Trucking of Glen Head, New York, that would set up the car delivery for $745, a price that sounded fair to Allen.
He paid a deposit and received the contract on a Friday afternoon and called the company to ask some questions.
A company representative refused to go over the contract with him, told him he had to get off the phone because he “has a social life,” and left Allen wondering what he was getting into.
That should have been a red flag, Allen says now.
Allen said he just hoped his car would arrive soon so he could get home for Christmas with his family.
But last year, Allen would have no Christmas with his family.
 
Monday, August 29, 2011

Mountain Biking Mackinac Find the ?real? island offroad on 2 wheels

Features Mike Terrell It may be hard to think of Mackinac Island as a mountain biking destination when you think of the crowded village, fudge shops, horse traffic, and the flat, paved ride around the exterior of the island.
However, once you leave the village and climb up into the interior of the rock-bound island, beyond the fort and Arch Rock, the crowds and aroma of cooking fudge quickly disappear. You may see a horse-back rider, but they have their own set of forest trails. It’s a totally different look at this historic, hump-backed island.
After disembarking the boat head over to the island’s Chamber of Commerce information center located along the main street near the ferry docks and pick up a map of the island with all the interior trails. Most of the trails are marked with trail signs and are fairly easy to follow. You’ll see old stone walls and foundations, an old soldier’s garden area cleared in the late 1700s, Skull Cave, and little known treats like Cave-in-the-Woods and Crack-in-the-Island. I’ve found island residents that didn’t know these formations existed.
 
Monday, August 22, 2011

Derek Bailey

Features Rick Coates Chairman Derek Bailey of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB) recently postponed a family getaway to the Upper Peninsula to speak at a memorial service. These constant schedule changes and being accessible 24/7 as the Tribal Chairman have become the lifestyle Bailey and his family have adopted since his election three years ago.
“We were looking forward to our trip, but I was asked to speak at a memorial service for Helen Hornbeck Tanner. I considered it not only an honor but my obligation to be there,” said Bailey. “Tanner, while not Native American, played several crucial roles in the recent history for Indian tribes of the Great Lakes region. She is not the only reason but she certainly is a key reason why we (the GTB) are where we are at today. It was important that I let her family and friends know how much we appreciate what she did for us and equally important that our tribal communities know of her importance.”
 
Monday, August 22, 2011

Public Safety

Features Patrick Sullivan CLINCH PARK DEATH
City officials want to find out how a teenager swimming in the Clinch Park
Marina suffered an electric shock and drowned.
Michael Scott Knudsen, 18, of Mancelona, died at around 7:30 p.m. Aug. 15.
An autopsy showed the cause of death to be electric shock/drowning,
according to a City of Traverse City news release.
A preliminary investigation by the city determined that a short in a
220-volt electrical line, which carries power to a section of floating
dock, caused an electrical current to enter the water, according to the
city’s press release.
 
 
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