Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

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Monday, November 7, 2011

Letters

Letters

Military cannot resign

Recently on NPR’s Talk of the Nation (10/24) author Bob Woodward said that senior military leaders have threatened to resign over President Obama’s announcement that troops would leave Iraq this year. The 2011 withdraw timeline was established in December 2008 between President Bush and the Iraqi government – and endorsed by President-Elect Obama.

For military officers to threaten resignation not only is an overt attempt to subvert the authority of the President, but is a renunciation of the officer’s oath to “support and defend the Constitution.” Article Two of the Constitution establishes the President as the Commander-in-Chief of the military...

 
Monday, October 31, 2011

Letters 10/31/2011

Letters

Vote YES on Proposal 1

My son came home for Thanksgiving this year and asked to sit down with my wife and me. He had an important decision to share with us. Christopher is a 29-year-old practicing attorney in Milwaukee. “I’m going to join the Army if the congress rescinds the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell law.”

Chris has always wanted to serve his country but could not enlist 10 years ago because he was honest with the Army recruiter. Chris is gay. The armed forces no longer discriminate against gay soldiers. Chris just finished his basic training and Officer Candidate School (OCS) after training for 20 weeks in the hot Georgia sun. He is one of the first openly gay officers in the US Army (2nd Lieutenant). Chris’ unit is slated to depart for Afghanistan in January 2013...

 
Monday, October 24, 2011

Letters 10/24/2011

Letters

The 99%

As the 99% of citizens who are not millionaire/billionaires we have, and still do, bail out bankers to the tune of billions. We bail out private corporations. We give billions in welfare payments to farmers and the corporate billionaires who run corporate farms. We give billions to Israel, billions to Iraq and Afghanistan.

The 1% of the richest Americans pay less that half in taxes that we 99% do as a percentage of income. We give away billions to insurance companies and executives, we give billions to drug manufactures, doctors, and hospitals. We give billions to Wall Street bankers...

 
Monday, October 10, 2011

Letters 10/10/2011

Letters

Science & vaccines

I am writing this in response to Heidi Kistler’s letter “Chose not to vaccinate.” While I wholeheartedly agree with Ms. Kistler’s views on freedom of choice and the importance of personal research, her logic train derails before it even has a chance to leave the station.

What she calls “fear-based rhetoric” is actually science-based medicine and it is responsible for the high quality of life we enjoy in modern western civilization. The number of ways modern medicine has benefited humanity is rivaled only by the number of logical fallacies in her argument...

 
Monday, October 3, 2011

Letters 10/03/2011

Letters

Different strokes...

I read Teresa Baker’s letter to the editor regarding your “My Style” column (Letters, 9/12). I applaud the editor’s comments about fashion creating millions of jobs and how it colors our world. I have a few comments to add.

Teresa, I’m sorry that you have such a problem with what some people will pay for an outfit. I have to say that I can only agree with you if we knew that these people were walking around in $400+ outfits while their children were unfed and their bills unpaid. But, for the sake of your comments and mine we don’t know that. Just like any reality TV show the “My Style” column is a voyeuristic look into other people’s lives and was created solely for entertainment purposes. If you weren’t so entertained you wouldn’t look at it every week.

I have a couple of questions for you...

 
Monday, September 26, 2011

Letters 09/26/2011

Letters

Call of the Wind

One sunlit and breezy summer day I had the pleasure of experiencing first-hand the beauty of what a wind farm could be.

Just off 115, south of Cadillac across rolling farmland not so unlike our own Benzie County, windmills stand in exquisite harmony with their surroundings. As I watched those marvels hard at their work it became clearer than ever; these are not things to fear or dread, for as in many manmade creations there is a gentle and artistic grace to them...

 
Monday, September 12, 2011

Letters 09/12/2011

Letters

The legacy of 9/11

9/11/2001 was a crime, not an act of war. Four women from New Jersey, whose spouses had been killed in the Twin Towers, forced an investigation. Those in power fought the concept, and then stacked the Commission on 9/11 so that the toughest questions would not be asked...

 
Monday, September 5, 2011

Letters 9/5/11

Letters The smoky blues...
I hate the smoking ban. I hate it, I hate it, I hate it. I love smoking. I
love smoking after I eat, and I love smoking while I drink. For most
smokers, smoking after meals and while drinking are 2 of the 3 best times
to have a cigarette (smoking after sex will always be #1, but it’s a close
race). The smoking ban in bars needs to go, soon, or we will suffer a fate
worse than cancer, emphysema, stained teeth and bad breath combined. A
fate that no amount of legislation, money, or self help books will ever
fix. What is this horrible fate?
American bars will be lame.
Yep, that’s right. Lame. A longtime bar-hopper myself, I took the smoking
ban personally and exiled myself from the scene. I know where my money’s
not wanted. Months went by before I ventured back, and when I did, I
didn’t like who and what I saw. Non-smokers. Whole families of ’em,
sitting there, not smoking, clearly visible. It was then that I realized
that there is a fundamental difference between smokers and non-smokers:
Non-smokers are lame. They’re good people, but just lame, and therefore
should be banned from bars. Why?
They won’t put a hot stick of flaming tobacco in their mouth.
Invariably, people who defy death are more interesting than others. Doing
something that is dangerous, that has a level of unpredictability, is
interesting. Dangerous=interesting. Smoking=dangerous.
Smokers=interesting. Smoking automatically makes you interesting.
Dangerous. And unpredictable. Add a little alcohol and bad judgment and
you now have a recipe for a good time. While I have witnessed many
non-smokers trying to recreate this level of good time, it always seems to
come out like cable porn. All soft jazz, scripted, and no money shot.
Bars used to be the last bastion of debauchery and depravity, where
society allowed and tolerated ‘getting loose’. When you walked into a
bar, you never knew where the night was going to take you. Anything
could, and did, happen. Bars were loud, smelly, and dangerous. Only
ne’er-do-wells would remain after happy hour, lighting another cigarette,
dreading the eventual last call.
Now, bars are filled with PG movie-loving, designated-driver-having, “I
wear a helmet Rollerblading” non-smoking lame-O’s that brought us such
joys as the Parental Advisory warning. And that’s not cool.
I lament the loss of our cultural coolness that accompanies the smoking
ban. No more meet-cutes that start with ‘I saw her across a smoky bar’.
No more lighting a lady‘s cigarette as an icebreaker. James Dean
wanna-bes’ will have to be content to lean against the bar, posing, with a
ringing cell phone rolled up in their sleeve. Smoking in the boy’s room
will now land you in jail. The Marlboro Man has left flavor country, his
miles no longer redeemable. There are no more places in America were
everybody is welcome anymore.
Please bring back smoking in bars, now, before I lose my cool.

Joe Ferraro • via email
 
Monday, August 29, 2011

Letters 8/29/11

Letters The Moon Over Arcadia
Did you see the moon over Arcadia last night?
Alone in the evening sky
Luminescent over the earth
Full and round, a perfect orb?

Did you see the moon last night?
Starting low, climbing high
More than a pearl, less than a planet,
Glazed with tangerine glow
First in the company of sunset,
Then blazing stars?

Did you see the moon last night?
Lighting the journey to dawn,
Slipping low, glistening golden
Saying goodnight to our good morning?

I hope you can see the moon on future nights-
That it won’t be lost in competition
With batteries of blinking Industrial turbine lights,
Constructed high in the sky
With random abandon.

I hope in the future,
The moon which
Mariner’s sail by,
Lovers swear by,
Poets write by,
And astrologers plan by
Is still eminently visible,
As the sole bearer of light in darkened skies.

I hope as the new moon rests, biding its time,
Making us appreciate its source and power,
That we look to the blank heavens
As testament to its glorious cyclical illumination.

I hope, both now and in the future,
That the moon is always rising,
Alone, bright, and beautiful, over the
Pleasant valley we call Arcadia.

Connie Macek • Arcadia
 
Monday, August 22, 2011

Letters 8/22/11

Letters Mandatory vaccine?
I was at a presentation by Mary Tocco who has been researching and
lecturing on vaccines for about 30 years. As a chiropractor, my
interest was to gain perspective to be able to answer questions from
Munson Medical Center employees who are being mandated to receive the
flu shot this year or lose their jobs (I believe this also applies to
volunteers).
Many of the employees who were there that night feel their rights to
choose what they put into their bodies are being violated. Especially,
because some of the adjuvants in the vaccine have been shown to be at
toxic levels. Her presentation showed evidence-based research
questioning the safety of the flu vaccine.
In addition, before you get the flu shot, reflect on this. Research by
Hugh Fudenberg, MD, a leading immunogeneticist and an often quoted
biologist (nearly 850 papers in peer review journals): If an individual
has had 5 consecutive flu shots between 1970 and 1980 (the years
studied) his/her chances of getting Alzheimer’s Disease is 10 times
higher than if he/she had one, 2 or no shots. Dr. Fudenberg said it was
due to mercury and aluminum that is in every flu shot. The gradual
mercury and aluminum buildup in the brain causes cognitive dysfunction.
What are they thinking mandating this?
My big question is, where will this all end? Will entering patients
also be required to get vaccinated before treatment in the hospital?
What other vaccines will be mandated? Will other companies follow? Are
civil rights being violated?


Dr. Greg Chappell • TC
 
Monday, August 15, 2011

Letters 8/15/11

Letters The real deficit
We have a “democracy deficit disorder” in our country. Here’s the evidence:

• Endless wars;
• Constant campaigning and lobbying;
• Debased public discussion;
• Corporate spin replacing investigative journalism;
• An economy built on debt and military spending;
• Fear mongering against anyone who doesn’t look or talk like us, or has a
different lifestyle;
• Protecting wealthy corporations at the expense of the public good;
• Subsidizing companies that don’t need it;
• Free market fantasy that sends our job overseas;
• Exporting jobs to countries that pay slave wages and degrade the
environment;
• Privatizing the commons (water and public lands);
• Attacking public education and unions;
• Allowing the powerful and wealthy to write our laws;
• Ignoring climate change that is affecting the lives of all peoples;

Being a citizen requires more than voting; it requires questioning and
being skeptical. It means digging deeper and thinking critically. Whatever
happened to informed, thoughtful, in-depth discussion without rancor and
insults?
There is much to be done to build resilience for changes already happening.
It is time to stop allowing pundits and politicians to steer our future.
We are all responsible. The destiny of the earth is in our hands.

Ann Rogers • TC
 
Monday, August 8, 2011

Letters 8/8/11

Letters Scumbags of the North
Here’s to you, the filth of the north. You know who you are. The
unattended roadside fruit and vegetable stand thieves.
You pathetic cowards. How dare you vultures pillage from such trustworthy
people? What possesses you to snatch up an entire stand’s inventory
without leaving a single penny? I hope you do it to provide for your
family because you economically can’t afford to put food on the table.
How do you sleep at night? Do you toss and turn and wonder why? If some of
you are the unfortunate ones who have been stricken by this dismal economy
then I’ll spare you some regret. But, no matter how bad you think you have
it, I’m sure almost all of these farmers have it worse.
Do you have any idea what farmers have to go through, how much they have
to sacrifice, in order to produce any kind of profit? Maybe you should
visit one of the many local farmers’ markets held throughout the region
and inquire.
If you have any conscience at all I’m sure you’ll realize the mistake
you’ve made by depriving these farmers’ families an opportunity to earn
some kind of coin to support themselves. Hopefully, you’ll drive back to
the very stand (s) you stole from, beg for forgiveness and pay the hard
working, trusting people who unselfishly devout their whole entire lives
into producing food to nourish our communities, twice the amount of what
you so apathetically looted. And if you don’t, well I wish there will come
a day after you’ve spent weeks upon weeks suffering on your death bed and
at that very moment you’ll ponder your miserable existence and ask, “Why
me?”
And just then a montage of all the incomprehensible events that you’ve
per-formed in your spineless life will flash before you. Only to be
followed by you flatlining into the gates of hell allowing you all of
eternity to decipher if stealing from these farmers was an ethical
decision or not. After all, as bad as it seems at this point, it might
not be too late to redeem yourself.
...Or, you can just DO THE RIGHT THING!!!!
For whatever reason you have done this despicable act, just remember this.
The only thing we truly can control in life is our own conscience. There’s
no one else to blame but ourselves.

M.B. McGee • TC
 
Monday, August 8, 2011

Letters 8/8/11

Letters Scumbags of the North
Here’s to you, the filth of the north. You know who you are. The
unattended roadside fruit and vegetable stand thieves.
You pathetic cowards. How dare you vultures pillage from such trustworthy
people? What possesses you to snatch up an entire stand’s inventory
without leaving a single penny? I hope you do it to provide for your
family because you economically can’t afford to put food on the table.
How do you sleep at night? Do you toss and turn and wonder why? If some of
you are the unfortunate ones who have been stricken by this dismal economy
then I’ll spare you some regret. But, no matter how bad you think you have
it, I’m sure almost all of these farmers have it worse.
Do you have any idea what farmers have to go through, how much they have
to sacrifice, in order to produce any kind of profit? Maybe you should
visit one of the many local farmers’ markets held throughout the region
and inquire.
If you have any conscience at all I’m sure you’ll realize the mistake
you’ve made by depriving these farmers’ families an opportunity to earn
some kind of coin to support themselves. Hopefully, you’ll drive back to
the very stand (s) you stole from, beg for forgiveness and pay the hard
working, trusting people who unselfishly devout their whole entire lives
into producing food to nourish our communities, twice the amount of what
you so apathetically looted. And if you don’t, well I wish there will come
a day after you’ve spent weeks upon weeks suffering on your death bed and
at that very moment you’ll ponder your miserable existence and ask, “Why
me?”
And just then a montage of all the incomprehensible events that you’ve
per-formed in your spineless life will flash before you. Only to be
followed by you flatlining into the gates of hell allowing you all of
eternity to decipher if stealing from these farmers was an ethical
decision or not. After all, as bad as it seems at this point, it might
not be too late to redeem yourself.
...Or, you can just DO THE RIGHT THING!!!!
For whatever reason you have done this despicable act, just remember this.
The only thing we truly can control in life is our own conscience. There’s
no one else to blame but ourselves.

M.B. McGee • TC
 
Monday, August 1, 2011

Letters 8/1/11

Letters Remembering Reuther
I retired from the UAW Legal Department in Detroit in November, 1999. I
was hired in May, 1970 and started work there the first day after Walter
Reuther’s death in the Pellston plane crash. I was on his office calendar
as the first appointment had he returned. Patrick Sullivan’s story, “A
Plane Mystery” about Sasha Reuther’s documentary “Brothers on the Line”
brings back many memories. How lucky for me to have spent my working life
fighting for our real American heroes—the working class.
The Reuthers made the UAW into the finest, most progressive labor union.
The UAW helped build the middle class in the ’50s, was instrumental in
helping the civil rights movement and was one of the first institutions to
oppose the Vietnam war. The basic principles of working life that we now
take for granted were championed by the UAW.
Walter Reuther was honored by George Romney with the title of “the most
dangerous man in America”. His successor, Leonard Woodcock (our first
ambassador to China) was #9 on Nixon’s famous enemies list with the words
“No comments necessary!” The next president, Doug Fraser, was perhaps the
greatest man I have ever had the pleasure to work with.
All of these great people were dedicated to a simple principle – that
working men and women were entitled to some say in their terms and
conditions of employment and the dignity and self-respect that came with
representation.
The working class and union membership is once again under attack by the
right-wing nuts. Every totalitarian movement has made labor unions their
first target. Fortunately, as long as we have freedom and democracy,
workers will naturally seek democratic rights at their workplace. May
there always be a UAW.

Leonard Page • Cheboygan
 
Monday, July 25, 2011

Letters 7/25/11

Letters Invasive species & slime
The green slime found along the shoreline of the Great Lakes is indeed a
turnoff (re: Terry Hunley’s July 11 letter).
Communities, industries, and governments made impressive strides in
addressing the problems found in the lakes over 40 years ago. Cities, from
Manistee to Detroit, reduced phosphorus levels in their treated
wastewaters. Local watershed groups worked closely with Michigan’s
Department of Environmental Quality to establish long range watershed
protection plans for virtually every significant watershed in Michigan.
These plans set forth cooperative methods to directly deal with all
sources of nutrients which can foul the Great Lakes. State and Federal
agricultural agencies have worked diligently with farmers to promote soil
testing and to exclude livestock from our waterways.
The lack of controls over the introduction of invasive species remains the
significant unaddressed issue related to nutrients in the Great Lakes. The
first wave of polluters were the zebra mussels. They provided both food
and habitat for the green slimes (chladophora, a filamentous, attached
algae). Now quagga mussels appear to have supplanted the zebra mussels,
again providing the same conditions which promote the slime growth.
When the algae starts to die off it floats to the surface and collects
upon the shoreline.
The Great Lakes shipping industry successfully fought off appropriate
regulations as they continued to import nearly 200 invasive species.
There may not be as many concrete actions that can be taken to reverse
this unfortunate situation. A new, and not necessarily pleasant,
ecological balance will settle into the lakes.
In the meantime, the cities and industries will continue to remove
significant amounts of phosphorus from their treated waters. State and
federal agencies will continue their oversight. And the lakes will
continue to respond to the presence of nearly 200 invasive species brought
to them from around the world.

Mike Stifler • Cadillac
 
 
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