Letters

Letters 08-25-14

Save America

I read your paper because it’s free and I enjoy the ads. But I struggle through the left wing tripe that fills every page, from political cartoons to the vitriolic pen of Mr. Tuttle. What a shame this beautiful area of the state has such an abundance of Socialist/democrats. Or perhaps the silent majority chooses to stay silent...

Doom, Yet a Cup Half Full

In the news we are told of the civil unrest at Ferguson, Mo; ISIS war radicals in Iraq and Syria; the great corporate tax heist at home. You name it. Trouble, trouble, everywhere. It seems to me the U.S. Congress is partially to blame...

Uncomfortable Questions

defending the positions of the Israelis vs Hamas are far too narrow. Even Mr. Tuttle seems to have failed in looking deeply into the divide. American media is not biased against Israel, nor or are they pro Palestine or Hamas...

The Evolution of Man Revisited

As the expectations of manhood evolve, so too do the rules of love. In Mr. Holmes’s statement [from “Our Therapist Will See Us Now” in last week’s issue] he narrows the key to a successful relationship to the basic need to have your wants and needs understood, and it is on this point I expand...

Home · Articles · News · Letters

Letters

 
Monday, December 28, 2009

Letters

Letters Seek Medicare for all
The United States, the wealthiest country on earth, is the only
industrialized nation that has not accepted the moral imperative to
provide health care for all of its citizens.
Because we haven’t, tens of thousands of Americans die each year, our
infant mortality rate is double that of the other industrialized
nations, thousands of uninsured people rely on hospital emergency
departments for care which could be delivered better in an office
setting at lower cost, and overwhelming health care costs are the
leading cause of personal bankruptcy.
We have experience with various plans; private health insurance with
overhead costs exceeding 25%, HMOs and PPOs with designated care
providers, tax-supported government run systems such as military and
veterans clinics and hospitals, and Medicare. Medicare is a
single-payer government insurance plan, not a government run
(socialized) health care system. It relies on a separate private
health care delivery system, allows free choice of physicians and
hospitals, has no restrictions for pre-existing conditions and has
overhead costs of less than 5%.
There is no free lunch and no free health care. We pay twice as much
as other industrialized nations for health care and receive less in
return. But if Medicare was available to all citizens (a single-payer
option), the purchasing power could dramatically decrease drug and
medical provider costs. And if individuals or employers paid their
premiums or taxes (different names; same money) to a system such as
Medicare rather than for private insurance, savings from lower
overhead costs alone would be enormous. We could have high quality
care and add nothing to the national debt.
If you like your present insurance coverage, keep it. But if you want
good care for all of our citizens at lower cost, encourage your
congressmen to insist on a single-payer option.

William R. Olsen M.D. • Northwest Michigan Cares
 
Monday, December 21, 2009

Letters

Letters No lack of concerts
In response to Rick Coates’ article “Where Are All the Concerts?” (12/14).
Here is a list of music performances from international touring
musicians and bands that have performed at InsideOut Gallery in just
the last two of the four years we have been presenting concerts. Many
of these artists have returned two and three times. A very large
number of these acts were booked and performed during the winter
months. Sorry Mr. Coates missed them.
Many of these shows were co-produced by Seamus Shinners of Connemara
Concerts, who has been sponsoring great music in this region for
decades. Seamus produces many great music performances at many
different venues every month. If anyone should be included in a round
table discussion about the concert promoters and venue managers in
this area, it’s him.
You want to truly find out how the live music biz works? Look no
further than Traverse City’s very own Rick Shimmel. You could do a
whole separate magazine on what Rick has accomplished in the live
concert promotion world.
Coates and the Northern Express need to get off the Applebees Music
Circuit and start paying greater attention to the “truly innovative”
music that is being presented in Northern Michigan on a regular basis.
Sorry if it sounds like sour grapes on my part, but good God -- lame
classic rock and the casinos? See you at the next Chubby Checker show!
(Included was a list of more than 60 performers.)

Michael Curths • InsideOut, TC

 
Monday, December 14, 2009

Letters

Letters Riveting Read...
Anne Stanton’s articles on U.S. Rep. Bart Stupak should be reprinted
in the Washington Post and New York Times. Her Stupak interview about
the world of the C Street “Family” (12/7) is riveting.
As a Grand Traverse Democrat, I supported Mr. Stupak for years, but no
more. The Stupak Amendment to the health care bill is a pointed,
political attack on women’s health insurance rights and reproductive
rights. His association with the “Family” (a secret religious group in
Washington DC) – is very surprising news.

Grant W. Parsons • TC
 
Monday, December 7, 2009

Letters

Letters Rooster Ruckus
I would like to thank Noah Fowle and the Express for the article on
our pet bird, Beaker. A clarification on a couple things, however
-- Jim Tamlyn stated Beaker is outside crowing and the neighbors are
complaining, not noting it is only a small number of neighbors
complaining.
According to Emmet County’s own investigators, who have been on
site several times -- they never heard the rooster. Beaker lives
indoors, has his own kennel (cleaned daily) in our basement. In
limited increments, Beaker does go outside after 12 noon, and is
brought inside if he crows excessively, just as one would do with a
barking dog (like the ones owned by our complaining neighbors).
The same zoning ordinance also prohibits planting flowers,
vegetables or trees on less than two acres. Yet, while Emmet County
chooses not to enforce this obviously ridiculous part of the
ordinance, it is heavy-handedly executing orders in another part of
the same ordinance.
This is a case of discrimination and unfair application of the law.
We have tried to place Beaker on three separate farms and each time
were requested to come and get him as the people feared he would not
survive because he was so stressed. He is deathly afraid of other
chickens. He has bonded to his human and animal family and would
likely suffer from separation.
If Beaker were a special needs child, I am fairly certain our
neighbors would not object. But, he is a ‘special needs’ animal and
our neighbors simply cannot wrap their limited imaginations around the
concept that a bird is a bird.
Keeping Beaker is no different from keeping a parrot or a cockatoo
for a pet, yet these are allowed and he is NOT. Where is the so-called
‘compassion‘ in that reasoning?

Andy & Sharon Peters • Petoskey
 
Monday, November 30, 2009

Letters

Letters Escape from Afghanistan
The best way to get rid of a good idea is to give it to a committee that never meets.
Some people are growing impatient with President Obama for not making a decision about sending more troops to Afghanistan. What he’s doing is waiting for the whole idea of having troops there to die on the vine, and for good reason.
There is no definition of victory in Afghanistan. We are not going to convert Afghans to Christianity or turn them into Republicans and Democrats. An authority on what it would take for Karzai to equip and maintain a militia to hold onto power in the country estimates it would cost four billion a year, while the entire gross national product of the country is only one billion. It is not going to happen.
The Taliban are not the enemy of the
United States, though we are converting them fast to hate us. Our enemy is al Qaeda, an invisible, international group of fanatic terrorists with no borders and no uniforms. The Soviets had 300,000 troops in Afghanistan and lost. The country has been the death of empires that tried to subdue those fighting folks. You don’t go to bed with rattlesnakes.
So what’s the exist strategy? Simple: convene a conference of all countries that have their troops there and admit that the Taliban versus Karzai’s government is an internal conflict and none of our business. The U.S. cannot simply back out unilaterally without looking like a bunch of quitters and wimps, but if the consensus of the countries contributing troops is that there is no definition of victory, shutting down the effort is smart.
Sure, it will leave Karzai twisting in the wind, which he surely will at the end of a rope when the Taliban retake control of their country but remember: it is their country. We are interlopers, invaders, even crusaders if you will. We can offer Mr. Karzai asylum to save his hide, but that’s just a small factor in the end game.
With half of our own children dependent on food stamps and millions unemployed we have no business pumping money into a corrupt government where everyone steals and we stand to gain nothing but enemies whose culture believes in revenge, not reconciliation.
Keep on waiting, President Obama. Let the committee decide.

Harley Sachs • Houghton, MI
 
Monday, November 23, 2009

Letters

Letters Stupak & women
In response to the article on the Stupak amendment by Anne Stanton in the November 16 Northern Express Weekly:
Congressman Stupak, you claim in the article that National Public Radio says some groups that oppose your amendment are misrepresenting the facts. I, too, listened to the NPR analysis of your abortion ban amendment, and clearly we heard two different things.
Whereas you heard, “Keeps the law the same,” I heard, “Makes permanent a law that currently has to be renewed every year,” and, “Abortion rights could be curtailed if this bill becomes law.”
I think we both heard, “Women still have the option to buy an extra rider to cover abortion services.” Although being a woman, I think my interpretation was a little different than yours. Mr. Stupak.
I have likely never been as insulted by anyone as you at that moment in my life. I actually yelled at the nice NPR anchor. “Women do not plan unplanned pregnancies! We plan the births of our children. We plan on providing for them. We plan every last penny in our lives in order to do so! What a ridiculous notion that we will be without coverage because we didn’t plan to have an abortion.”
Hide behind the “we’ve got to get this thing passed” rhetoric all you want. But what I just heard was, “Women be damned.”
If we are poor, federal employees, members of the military, receiving Indian Health Insurance, on Medicaid, on disability, hoping for a public option, likely to receive federal subsidies on a public option – if we are in fact the women who already pay more for our medical costs than men because we pay for years of reproductive health coverage like birth control – then what I just heard was, “You are my Political Pawn.”
I would encourage men and women alike to contact their representatives and ask them to oppose this amendment.
Maybe then what I will hear from you, Congressman Stupak, is an apology.

Jennifer Kirkpatrick Johnson
• Kingsley
 
Monday, November 16, 2009

Letters

Letters No guns on campus
I live in Leelanau county, the same beautiful county where State Senator Michelle McManus resides. It is very important that I voice my opposition to having her legislation introduced to allow concealed weapons on college campuses.
I spent 25 years working with students on a college campus. Our security did not even carry guns. A college campus consists of a community of students between the ages of (approximately) 17-23 years of age. These students reside in a wonderful environment, for a few years in their lives.
I am so appalled at the concept of carrying concealed weapons on campus that I find myself searching for words to express my dismay on this issue.
Students do not want to sit in classes, go to events, or walk to parking lots knowing that the person near them is carrying a concealed weapon. Faculty and staff do not want students to have weapons. When weapons, of any dangerous kind, are found on students or in residence halls, they are confiscated, to protect themselves and the other members on campus. I sincerely hope that
Sen. McManus examines the concept of students being allowed to carry concealed weapons. I shudder at the thought.

Dorothy Mudget • Leelanau County

Heartbroken
On October 26 the Express ran an article called the “High Price of Toking.” Imagine my heartbreak as I read the article about my son, Trevor Coddington. I was not consulted about this ‘story’ and had I been, I would have reminded the writer and participants that this child is no longer with us, and disgracing his memory for monetary gain, as is mentioned in the story, is unconscionable.
Whether the court system was 100 percent correct in its treatment of my son or not, the decisions were made, years ago. As a responsible parent, I will pay for what is required by the court.
Trevor was a good and loving son. Unfortunately he will not get a chance to prove that, or what a great adult he would have been.
Might I suggest a good story called “The High Price of Grief?” Perhaps the word compassion will come up in that particular story.
Sandy Zoulek • via email

(The Express attempted to contact Sandy Zoulek for the story, but was unable to obtain her address or phone number. - ed.)
 
Monday, November 9, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 11/09/09
Parents & responsibility
Is this article about the high costs parents pay for their children’s crimes or is it a sob story about a teen drug addict? (Re: “The High Price of Toking,” 10/26.) The fact is that teens with parents that take responsibility for their children’s actions make
better parents.
This article shows that the father, Dan, was trying to get out of paying his son’s fines rather than simply having his son, Trevor, assume some of the responsibility. The saddest part of this story is that Dan did not seem to be able to control Trevor. Even after months in rehab Trevor continued to ‘hang with the wrong crowd’ and use drugs and alcohol. Why did Dan allow this? Considering the lack of parental control in young Trevor’s life, I agree that the parents should be responsible for the fines and costs.
I feel sorry for Trevor’s mother; she seems to have had no say in what discipline Trevor received and yet she paid the fines and costs without complaint.
I am the non-custodial parent of a teenage boy (he lives with his grandmother due to the poor choices I made in the past). I have already had to pay some court costs for the choices he has made. Yet, whenever I try to suggest a different way to discipline, or voice an opinion as to the unacceptable behavior of his friends, I am reminded that I do not have custody and therefore (in their opinion) I have no say in his upbringing.
I understand how Trevor’s mother must feel, and I am sorry for her loss.

Elizabeth Fox • via email


Advice for journalists
In his column Robert Downes reflected about which stories to pursue in the Nov.
3-10 Northern Express. In that issue you carried a long story by Anne Stanton about a woman who could be brought up on a murder charge. You went through her history in painstaking detail in a manner reminiscent of Jerry Springer.
I would argue that such a story should not be featured in your newspaper. Why? Because it does not relate to larger issues that affect the public. By contrast, your piece on Dan Coddington (“The High Price of Toking”) and the justice of courts inflicting large monetary obligations upon youth and parents is totally appropriate because it lays bare state laws and law enforcement practices that could be changed.
While the difficulty in getting all the facts frequently provides a barrier to writing a story (as Downes indicates), some stories are not worth investigating simply because they have no significance outside the people directly involved. Reject the stories for which evidence cannot be found. Reject the stories that have no significance. Following those rules you should be able to do a terrific job on the rest!

Richard Fidler • TC
 
Monday, November 2, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 11/2/09
Laughing stock legislators
If anyone needs more evidence as to why Lansing does not take our Northern Michigan legislators seriously, one need look no further than the story regarding our representatives pushing for handguns being allowed on college campuses.
Michelle McManus and Wayne Schmidt have become the laughing stock of legislators, along with Alan Cropsey (R-Dewitt), who is pushing hard for guns to be allowed in Michigan high schools.
The voters of Grand Traverse keep sending these right-wingers to Lansing even though they are obviously out of touch with the majority and are very ineffective when it comes to representing our real interests. From school financing to return on tax investment to amount spent on roads, Northern Michigan has been getting the short end of it for years. We are not taken seriously in Lansing!
Allowing kids to have guns on a college campus, or arming public school teachers with weapons designed only to kill fellow human beings is antithetical to the education purpose and process. (Duh!) It also is against the majority’s wishes and flies in the face of common sense and human dignity.
No wonder Lansing laughs at us - look no further than McManus and Schmidt.

Gary S. Powell • TC

Sound the alarm
“Choice and competition.” That’s the new catch phrase to sell healthcare reform in Washington. I recall Obama himself saying you can keep your own plan, keep your own doctor. Do you remember? The “facts’ say otherwise.
Congressman Paul Ryan who sits on the committee writing the bills, says under “all four bills” being considered, plans like my own high deductible/HSA will be “illegal.” So much for the rhetoric!
If you oppose Obama’s plans, protest in Washington, listen to talk radio, or watch Fox News, you‘re labeled an “angry white male.” To the contrary, those who oppose the plan are a diversified group from all ethnicities. I myself am simply worried about the country’s survival.
In closing, like Social Security those writing the plan are exempting themselves and many of their supporters from its repercussions. That fact, and the fact that they’re rushing its passage without us seeing it first, is further reason to sound the alarm and enough alone for its rejection.

Brian Spencer • TC
What‘s in your heart
I had to agree: an old timer and I were discussing family matters when the bombing of the Middle East and Baghdad came up. He said: “What can we expect when our own families can’t get along?”
How true. It really starts in the heart. It‘s time to take the log out of our own personal eye before we can help our brother or sister. It all starts with self; then onward towards family, town, state, country, world.

Steve Rozanski • TC

Cheers for Dan Scripps
In the term limit-caused wreckage of the State Legislature, one bright spot can be found – Representative Dan Scripps. Since taking office, Scripps has worked to protect the Great Lakes and improve school funding equity. His efforts may deserve some of the credit for Governor Granholm’s recent decision to reduce the school funding gap. During the ongoing budget crisis, Scripps fought successfully, on behalf of his fellow sportsmen, to save wetland protections. Additionally, he and like-minded legislators were able to reduce the size of cuts to education.
Scripps keeps in touch with his constituents. During the height of the budget crisis, he sent nearly daily updates to those on his email list. And he makes himself available each month to gather input from citizens in all four counties he serves.
So while Senate Majority Leader Bishop plays his silly and dangerous games, House Speaker Dillon demonstrates that he has no idea what it means to be a leader, and Senator McManus shows more interest in toeing the insane party line than meeting the needs of her constituents, we can count on Dan Scripps to do what’s best for the people of Michigan. We need more politicians just like him.

Fred A. Cepela • TC

 
Monday, October 26, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 10/26/09
The rest of the story...
The September 28, 2009 edition of the Northern Express contained a story about my overdraft nightmare (about a three-cent overdraft that resulted in hundreds of dollars in late fees from Chase bank).
My nightmare was a story about manipulation. Chase was using the classic carrots and stick form of manipulation to separate me from my money. The published story ended with Chase threatening to add still more fees to my account before closing it and permanently wrecking my credit record. Those threats were the sticks. The carrots came when they called to say that, if I paid just a little more money in the form of a greatly reduced fee, the whole matter would just go away. Instead, I emailed my “Nightmare” story to Senators Stabenow, Levin and Dodd (Chairman of the Senate Banking Committee).
Levin’s office was the only senator to reply. One of his aides called to suggest that I lodge a complaint with the Comptroller of the Currency. The website is: www.helpwithmybank.gov. I pasted my story onto that site’s complaint form. They emailed me a recognition number and said that I would hear from them within 30 days.
Subsequently, I received a short letter from Chase. It stated that my account had been credited for the most recent series of fees, relating to the three-cent overdraft, and had been closed with a zero balance! I immediately went on-line and verified. My checking account had disappeared. It was like it never existed. That was the good news. The bad news: Chase kept the $350 they took in the first two rounds of my overdraft nightmare. At this point, It appears that $350 was my parting gift to JP Morgan Chase; the not-so-small price I was forced to pay for my “Nightmare“ end.
I would like to thank the Northern Express for publishing my overdraft nightmare. The support from Northern Express readers was really appreciated. I was surprised at the number of people who have contacted me with similar banking problems.

Dominic R. Sondy • TC

More discrimination
I am writing to comment on “Letters 10/5 “A Lack of Respect” and Norm Jones‘ “Un Cool Insults“ on 10/19.”
I am a relatively new convert to Islam who has lived in the TC area for over 30 years. As a Muslim woman, wearing a hijab (head scarf) and modest, flowy clothing in and around our area, I have found 99 percent of the people here to be tolerant and very respectful. But, as some other ‘minorities’ can concur, it’s the one percent that make it difficult at times when you are just trying to mind your own business and go about living your life.
I work in a professional capacity and believe that I contribute in a positive way to my clients and the community and receive respect and support from co-workers in the workplace.
However, there have been incidents here in our lovely area that have caused me concern and disbelief -- having some “what has just happened here“ moments. Other incidents have caused me to feel downright fearful when I was threatened and physically assaulted due to my attire--and erroneous assumptions by my assailant.
Since becoming Muslim, I have had the following experiences: teen boys yelling slurs out of their car window in the parking lot at Tom‘s, a Christian woman (she was wearing a cross, so I assume she was a Christian) approached me in a local TC store -- demanding that I tell her where I’m “REALLY” from “originally.” She didn‘t take my word for it that I’m a 30-plus year resident. After repeatedly telling her that I am from TC she adamantly refused to believe me. She then grabbed me by the arm and shook me, saying, “You better watch out and not become one of those terrorists!”
On another occasion I was told that maybe I should move to Dearborn -- perhaps a joke maybe? But hey, by now, I’m beginning to wonder.
The lastest, since it was a housing discrimination incident, was the most disturbing. Recently during my search for an apartment in the area, I was told by a real estate agent who was renting an apartment for an out-of-state homeowner, that the rent now suddenly increased after he took one look at me when we met to see/show the apartment -- far different than the amount, which was $150 less, quoted over the phone. His cool and standoffish behaviour -- much different than his friendly tone on the phone, coupled with his discouraging remarks about the “flaws and drawbacks“ of the apartment let me know that I was not welcome there.

Maryam Hajar • TC

Music input
I’ve just finished reading Christopher Carlson’s October 19 letter, which you entitled “Doesn’t Like Column.” While I agree with Christopher that the Express’ Modern Rock can seem a little uninspired, and occasionally contains inaccurate information and dated reviews, I can see why your response was a little snarky... Tit for tat, as they say.
I laud the Northern Express Weekly for its coverage of local artists and those independant musicians who visit our area. It’s clear that you are truly dedicated to promoting the local art and music scene. However, while I mean no disrespect to Kristi Kates and her efforts, I have found Modern Rock disappointing of late. I agree with Christopher Carlson that you have an opportunity, yet often fail to introduce your readers to some of the amazing, innovative (and really catchy!) music produced by the scores of independant labels today: labels such as Secretly Canadian, Arts and Crafts, Thrill Jockey, Young Gods, XL Records, and Jagjaguwar... While I enjoy many of the groups Ms. Kates covers, I want to know what the young people like! Teens and 20somethings, after all, were the driving force that brought us swing, jazz, and rock & roll.
A consultation with the knowledgeable, music-loving owners of Sound It Out Records of downtown Traverse City might be a great place for a new music field trip. A little inspiration from others is always helpful in the creative process.

Mary Bowden • via email


Express Team Honored
The editorial, design and advertising team at Northern Express Weekly earned a number of awards in the 2009 Better Newspaper Contest sponsored by the Michigan Press Association.
• Anne Stanton took second place for “Unholy Childhood,“ her series on abuse in Harbor Springs; and also a second place for her “Computer Cop” series.
• Peg Muzzall took second place for her “Snowboard Girl“ cover photo.
• Robert Downes had an honorable mention for “Random Thoughts.”
• Colleen Zanotti, art director won first place for Best Color Ad (Bearcub Outfitters) and Best Promo Ad (Stimulus Package).
• Kyra Cross, graphic designer won second place for Best Color Ad (Hibbard‘s)
• The designers also won second place for Best Special Section.


 
Monday, October 19, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 10/19/09


Canada‘s public option
As a Canadian expat, I would like to assure my fellow northern Michiganders that the Canadian health care system is alive and well. Contrary to recent letters published in local papers, Canadians overwhelmingly support their universal system. A new poll conducted by the Toronto-based Nanos Research shows 86.2 percent of Canadians are for “strengthening public health care rather than expanding for-profit services.”
My family and I have had nothing but good experiences with our care north of the border. From my father’s aggressive treatment for melanoma, to my grandmother’s multiple joint replacements and my baby brother’s lengthy hospitalization for a bout with pneumonia, the care in our rural Manitoba town was professional, efficient, timely and always without co-pays, deductibles and monthly premiums.
Personally, I do not know of a single
Canadian who wishes their system to be more like ours here. With unaffordable and constantly rising premiums, caps on treatment amounts, denials of coverage to increase corporate profits and exclusion of those with preexisting conditions, can you blame them? No one should be forced into financial ruin because they could not afford health insurance. Please join me in supporting health care reform and the public option.

Ty Schmidt
TC, formerly of Dauphin, Manitoba


Crazy state spending
While the state is cutting school funding due to a lack of money, some department heads are spending money on what can only be termed “discretionary” spending. This past fiscal year, $11 million was spent with Mohawk Industries, Georgia, for carpet tile. This is enough tiles to carpet the road from Suttons Bay to Cadillac. $6.8 million was spent for ergonomic and general seating. This is enough chairs for about 10,000 state employees. This is about one-third of the state workforce that works seated. Sadly, it does not include the 100 State Police who were laid off; patrol car seating was not included.
Then, $18 million was spent with Public Consulting Group, Maine; the purpose was not stated, but with the name of the company it sounds like “help us with propaganda.“ And $28 million went to Integris of Maine for an “Executive Information System.” This begs the question of how many executives are there and what info is so valuable it
requires spending $28 million when times are tough?
These two Maine purchases total $46 million. The state slogan, “Buy Michigan First” apparently does not apply to our government. The governor has line item veto power; maybe she should start reading the line items to see where the dollars are going.

Keith Ashley • Lake Leelanau

Doesn‘t like column
I don’t mean to be a giant a-hole, but it would be really great, if you’re going to bother writing about “modern” rock, to have someone who actually seems to care about and know something about music write the column. Case in point: last issue’s column:
“Guitarist Tom Morello (Rage Against the Machine) is collaborating with rapper/MC Boots Riley to form the Street Sweeper Social Club, which features what Morello calls “crushing guitar work” and which should also appeal to Rage fans.” -- I’ve owned this CD since June. Not exactly news, this. Plus, Boots Riley is the MC for The Coup, who are responsible for what may be the most politically volatile, daring, and important hip-hop ever put on disk. Does that not deserve a mention? Beyond “should appeal to Rage fans”? Jesus.
Later on: “French studio-popsters Phoenix are offering up their fifth studio set, Love 2, but you’ll have to wait a little longer for the suave duo’s latest tunes - Love 2 will be released on October 6...” -- FAIL. It’s not Phoenix. It’s Air. The only thing they have in common, really, is that they’re French.
I know that someone who actually wants to write reviews of albums that haven’t been on the shelves for months can, with relative ease, make connections with indie labels and get promo copies of music that’s not out yet, and that won’t also be reviewed in People and Newsweek.
I know the Northern Express isn’t exactly known for being cutting edge, but seriously, I love music; you have the opportunity to introduce people to great bands that they won’t find at freaking Walmart, and you don’t. So why bother? You could totally use that space to advertise another yuppie-ass winery or talk about how much someone paid for their clothes.

Christopher Carlson • via email
 
Monday, October 12, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 10/12/09
Devastating closure
It’s Monday, my usual day for the gym. But I’m not going, nor are any of the Monday regulars at the Fitness Center. Why? Because with barely a week’s notice the
Fitness Center closed after 23 years of serving a diverse community at its convenient location.
While I am sad, others will be devastated, because it will be difficult, if not impossible, for them to go somewhere else. The Fitness Center served a few clients who were mentally and physically challenged, who walked or arrived by BATA bus, as well as young and old, fit and not so fit.
I take away two lessons: Out of town ownership is a BAD IDEA. Might things have been different if the owner had experienced the camaraderie, had seen the excellent guidance given by the trainers, had noticed the sense of loyalty and community among members?
That sense of community is my second lesson. I feel great affection for members whose figures now come to mind, people whose names I don’t know, to whom never spoke. We were all there together, doing our respective work to care for our bodies day after day. I will miss them all, as I will miss our competent, hard working trainers. Thank you all.
The Fitness Center was one of Traverse City’s well-kept secrets, a kind of gem in the rough. Opportunity awaits an entrepreneur would like to open an in town gym. He or she would find a supportive group of customers, ready to help market and make it work. I already have a name: Community Fitness, The Gym for the Rest of Us.

Alison Heins • TC

Protect the cougars
I understand that there is evidence that leads many scientists, veterinarians, and animal observers to believe that there is a breeding population of cougars in the state of Michigan.
I am asking that the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) take immediate action to start collecting evidence and try to determine how many cougars are in Michigan and what needs to be done to protect them.
Under the Michigan Endangered Species Act, the DNR is to “perform those acts necessary for the conservation, protection, restoration and propagation of endangered and threatened specifies of fish, wildlife and plants.”
By refusing to recognize the evidence presented by citizens of Michigan that cougars do exist in the state, the DNR fails to fulfill its obligation to protect cougars under the Endangered Species Act.

Pamela Thornton-Folkema
South Boardman
Mikko‘s bad decisions
Bravo! to Marty Beaudoin for his letter regarding Dennis Mikko (9/28).
Mr. Beaudoin could not have said it any better! My family’s lives also were affected negatively by Dennis Mikko’s decisions. He disregarded the facts, ignored the wishes of the children, and like Mr. Beaudoin stated, handled his courtroom in a dismissive, judgmental, opinionated and arrogant manner.
The Friend of the Court system has serious issues and should be monitored more carefully. Changes need to be made, everyone knows it, but nothing is being done.

Charleen Jach • TC

Corrections
Whoops -- Real Astrology was inadvertently omitted last week. Apologies.
Also, the band Umphreys McGee was in town promoting its new 2009 release, not their 2007 disc as stated in a story. And an ad for the band included a photo of the Disco Biscuits.


 
Monday, October 5, 2009

Letters

Letters Letters 10/5/09
A lack of respect
I’m probably the world’s worst lesbian. I don’t own any rainbows. I don’t have a sticker on my car declaring my sexuality. I rarely go to a gay bar. I think by now you get the point I’m trying to make. I’d rather people get to know me, for me, than judge me by the sexuality of the person I am dating.
I’m not an activist of any sort, but maybe that changed the night of August 16th at around 11 p.m. My girlfriend and I had left the benefit concert for musician, Jay Kott, at Union Street Station. We were walking down the street to our car and holding hands. We hadn’t even walked a block from the bar when a gray SUV drove by with its windows down. A young man’s head appeared and he yelled a homophobic slur at my girlfriend and me.
Mind you this is the first time I have ever had this happen to me. I just couldn’t believe it. Did that really just happen? I didn’t even have time to wrap my head around it, when a completely different gray SUV parked at the corner. And this time it was a young woman whose head came out to bombard us with yet another homophobic slur. That’s right people, two homophobic slurs in not even two blocks. They were disgusting things to say and I won’t repeat them here.
I couldn’t even talk. I was so livid. Really? This is 2009. I know that people are inherently different. And I know that we all have different views. I’m not trying to preach to anyone. I’m not trying to change anyone’s mind. I just want the respect that every human being deserves. I believe in the words of our forefathers. I believe in what our great country was founded upon. That Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness are for every human being. I think these rights should apply regardless of your age, ability, sex, ethnicity or sexual orientation. My pursuit may be different than others, but to me that makes every human being so amazingly wonderful. I honestly believe that no one deserves to walk down the street in fear of harassment. And I wouldn’t wish that fear on anyone.

Kiki Karpus • via email

Banks‘ rip-off scam
I read with great interest the article by Dominic Sondy (“An Overdraft Nightmare,“ 9/28). I, too, have had the misfortune of learning exactly how banks operate, and I’m none too pleased.
We have done our banking with the same bank, and its predecessors, for over 30 years. I recently received, via snail-mail, a notice from my bank that my account was overdrawn to the amount of one dollar. By the time I got everything squared away with the bank, overdraft fees and penalties had reached $84 -- for a one dollar overdraft. The bank waited two weeks to notify me.
I later found out that this is normal practice. Banks count very heavily on overdraft and late payment penalties to bolster their bottom line, and they’re vicious about it.
Someone could have, if they really were into “customer service,” picked up a phone and said, “Hey, man, you’re overdrawn by a buck. We’ll cover it, but how ‘bout you drop by today with a dollar bill and set it right?” But they didn’t. They deliberately waited two weeks to notify me so that the charges and penalties could add up.
They also failed to notify me that some businesses charge a handling fee for debit card purchases, and the bank passes that on to you -- but isn’t legally required to tell you that they’re doing so. Likewise, using another bank’s ATM involves a handling charge -- whether or not it says so on the screen. I have been robbed of $84 by my own bank.
The reality is, there is no customer loyalty on the part of banks or credit card companies. You are a money-making asset, and nothing more, no matter how long you’ve been a customer.
Needless to say, I no longer use my checking account. My employer requires me to have one because they only pay by direct deposit, but the money is deposited at 8 a.m., and it’s withdrawn -- all of it -- by noon. I pay bills with cash or money orders. I refuse to be a pawn in this financial con game any longer.

Howard J. Blodgett • TC.
Cops retrieved gun
In our store, we do everything possible to make sure the selling and buying of guns is done according to the laws. These laws were put in place to protect our neighborhoods, our children, and our right to bear arms. But when a handgun was stolen from its case just a few weeks ago, it was all put in jeopardy.
I’m writing this letter now, with great appreciation and, thankfully, the ability to exhale due to the Grand Traverse County Sheriff’s Department’s investigation. Their commitment to the safety of Northern Michigan led to a speedy recovery of the stolen handgun and one less unregistered firearm on our streets. I could not be more grateful for all the time and effort that was put forth in this case and I will sleep well at night knowing that we have good people out there protecting us.

Dan Griffith, Ace Buyers • TC


Kiln dust questions
The Environmental Protection Agency‘s (EPA) report to Congress on cement kiln dust (12/31/94) reveals that the dust contains dioxins and furans, known carcinogens. All 11 of the cement-producing sites like the one in Bay Harbor (the old Penn-Dixie-Holnam plant) contained dioxins and furans.
The EPA’s 12-31-07 Bay Harbor Progress Report stated that in the summer, Petoskey’s Camp Daggett well #5 draws water from under the CKD deposit, diverting it from entering the Lake Michigan shore – not surprising, considering the 1.5 million gallons of irrigation water poured daily onto the whole golf course just above the kiln dust deposits.
Mike Robbins, head of Petoskey’s Water Works confirms that pumping is reduced during the golf course irrigation season for Camp Daggett well #5 and is used as a back-up.
It is also noteworthy that the water capture area shown in EPA’s water well charts of the Bay Harbor project has shrunk from 2006 to 2007. The new EPA report doesn’t show the Preserve well #4 and Camp Daggett #5 well drawing Lake Michigan water in 2007, as it did the prior year. How can this be?
The new EPA report doesn’t show the Townsend well #3 drawing Lake Michigan water. This phenomenon was reported back in 1994 in NTH Consultants hydro-geological study, hired by Bay Harbor Co., reported that the more water they pumped, the softer the water got. Petoskey hydrologist Bob Buechler explained that after 18 hours of pumping, the cone of depression (source of the water being pumped) spreads out until it reaches a recharge barrier which, in this case, is Lake Michigan, whose water is very soft compared with the limestone hard ground water. How can this be?
Lake Michigan water levels rose nine inches in the last year. And CMS is having to capture and truck away more and more water. How much does Lake Michigan have to rise to flood out the leachate collection lines in Bay Harbor?
The cement kiln dust needs to be dug out of Bay Harbor. Paving roads with a 20 percent dust-asphalt mix has been approved by the EPA in other states.

David L. Clink • Petoskey

 
Monday, September 28, 2009

Letters 9/28/09

Letters Letters 9/28/09
“Us“ and “Them“
Michael Moore’s new movie and his recent appearance on Jay Leno have brought a serious fear on my part that he may succumb to the evils of the capitalistic society in which he is forced to live, causing him to fall into the category of “them.” “Them,” according to Mr. Moore on Leno, are the top one percent of wage earners in this country who own all of the wealth and are trying to take more from “us”. In his diatribe on Leno, Mr. Moore included himself in the “us” category, a potential victim of “them.” According to the 2007 census, “them,” (the top one percent of wage earners) are people making more than $410,096 dollars per year. Despite his charitable efforts to the local economy, I am afraid that he may one day crumble, and become one of “them.” I would offer the following solution so that he can continue to be one of “us” poor working slobs who are being raped by “them.” I would suggest that when the net profits of his new movie hit $410,095.99, that he no longer charge admission. This would reinforce his anathema for the process of earning money, allow him to remain one of “us,” and allow us all to continue to hold him at the level of esteem and respect that we currently do.

Dennis Sternburgh • Traverse City

Touched by the Loss
We wanted to thank Northern Express for the wonderful article on the stolen historic gate, and for inspiring so many people to respond to us.
We’ve had a few leads, however, nothing has turned up thus far.
I did want to relay an overwhelming expression of kindness and generosity from an experienced wrought-iron artist, Dan Nickels of Traverse City.
He stopped in the office to personally speak with Ray, and to offer his skills at replicating the gate when we’re ready to do so.
He said he would do this for free. All Ray has to do is supply the materials. As a serendipitous side-bar, his father, Dr. Mervin “Nick” Nichols, was interim Superintendent of the hospital in the ’60s.
As a result of your article, there are incredible people out there who have been genuinely touched by this loss.

Mini Minervini • Traverse City
Top ten reasons to oppose health care reform

10. You feel patriotic knowing that Americans spend more for prescription drugs than the French or Canadians.
9. You have a wealthy uncle who will be glad to cover your medical expenses when you lose your job.
6. You believe the right to life ends at birth.
7. You get a warm and fuzzy feeling knowing that your premiums helped to buy a bigger yacht for the insurance company CEO.
6. You are the insurance company CEO with the new yacht.
5. You would rather have insurance company bureaucrats decide who lives or dies than have the U. S. government guarantee health care to all.
4. You happen to be one of those bureaucrats -- you get bonuses for rescinding coverage from sick people.
3. You can easily afford to buy an organ transplant in Asia if you need one.
2. You plan to reject social security payments and Medicare coverage when you retire because they’re “socialistic.”
1. You’re a Congressman who’s been bought and paid for by insurance companies.

Alice Littlefield • Omena

Serious issue with Mikko Decisions
Regarding the recent charges filed against District Court Referee Dennis Mikko.
I have been in Dennis Mikko’s courtroom more times than I care to mention with custody issues.
He has been consistently dismissive, judgmental, opinionated and frankly arrogant. If I have had my life and the lives of my children decided by a potential pedophile then I have a serious issue with the entire court and friend of the court system in our community. Who could honestly say they feel good about a decision made by this man? He has had a profound affect on my life as well as many of my friends and acquaintances and our children with decisions regarding custody. Are we to presume his judgement has been unclouded by his “affliction”? Can I now have a review of the decisions made by Dennis Mikko or will the court dismiss this as an isolated incident without prejudice toward those effected by his decisions?
Can we as citizens enforce the ethic that we hold our judges and court officials to a higher standard? How about a non-pedophile standard. How low will we go?
I for one will want to meet with all of those who feel as I do and take appropriate action.

Marty Beaudoin • Traverse City

Charged!

Archie Kiel, the Rapid City man who appeared on the Northern Express cover with his lush medicinal marijuana plants in late August, is poised to become a test case for the state’s new marijuana medical law.
Kiel was arrested on September 17 and charged with a felony that could put him behind bars for up to 14 years.
Kiel’s pretrial hearing took place on September 21. He’ll now face arraignment on September 30 at 1 p.m. on charges of manufacture of more than 20 plants and less than 200, said Kalkaska Assistant Prosecutor Kirk Metzger who is handling the case.
The felony charge normally carries a seven-year maximum, but that doubles with a prior drug conviction of any kind. Kiel was previously convicted on a misdemeanor marijuana possession charge.
Metzger said he will offer a plea bargain to Kiel’s attorney, Ross Hickman.
State voters approved the marijuana medical law in November, which allows a “caregiver” or supplier to grow up to a maximum of 72 plants if the caregiver is also a patient and has five other patints.
Kiel, a father of three, is well known in Rapid City as a strong advocate for using marijuana as a therapy for cancer tumors and pain. He said he doesn’t take money for his plants, but runs a sort of informal co-op out of his home.
The case will likely come down to the interpretation of the new law and when the plants can be counted as legal medicine—when a patient receives a physical card from the state, which is backlogged on its patient applications, or when a patient can present evidence of a signed physician’s statement that says marijuana will have a therapeutic or palliative benefit for the patient’s serious or debilitating medical condition.




 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Letters 9/21/09

Letters Letters 9/21/09

What health care system?
The term “health care system” bandied about in debates about health care reform in this country refers to something that does not exist. Just what is a system, anyway?
A system is integrated and complete. Your car’s power train is a system. A large corporate entity is a system. The Veteran’s Administration is a system. If we had a national health care system, which we do not, there would be a manager, a governing board, and uniformity of care. Costs of procedures would be uniform whether you are in New York, Los Angeles or Calumet.
I get my medical care through the VA. I can go to any VA clinic anywhere in the country and they have access to my health records. From time to time I can request an update of my medical records and receive it, complete. It’s now about 500 pages. That’s a system.
But if you go to Florida and have a heart attack there or some other medical emergency, your Florida doctor will be hard-pressed to obtain your medical history from your Michigan hospital. By the time they do (if they can at all), you may be dead. No wonder 100,000 die a year in this country from medical mistakes. There is no coordination, no system.
Instead, we have a hodge-podge of programs. Medicare, administered by the states and sometimes administered as an HMO by Blue Cross as a “Medicare advantage” (advantage to whom? Blue Cross?) is uneven. A procedure authorized in Florida may not be permitted in the U.P.
What we do have are for-profit hospital chains, some of them notorious for Medicare fraud, such as unbundling blood panels and charging for each result separately, resulting in multi-million dollar fines. The worst offenders are fee-for-service plans. Others are HMOs that decline service because it is too expensive and cuts into their profits.
We need a single-payer national health program. Your health depends upon it.

Harley Sachs • Houghton

The next generation
How will they remember us, the generation that has so utterly and completely failed them? Will they remember us as trying to right our wrongs? Fighting to level the playing field for their future pursuit of happiness? Or will they remember us as self-involved, fearful sheep who invoked “our children and grandchildren” for political purpose? Will they reminisce about us as a thoughtful, civil generation or will they see us as silver haired bullies trying to get our minutes of fame on Youtube?
We have built for our children a gilded cage. It is made of the finest materials we could not afford. The bars are constructed with I.O.U.s for wars we didn’t need to fight, pork projects we didn’t need to fund, and waste we didn’t care to control. Each bar is reinforced with fees and long term contracts and gilded with 24K greed. The bottom of the cage is lined with useless warranties and fine print. The ceiling is constructed of an impenetrable material made of corporate influence melded with congressional self interest. We have built for them a corporatocracy.
We owe the next generation more than throwing them in the hole we dug and handing them a shovel. It is our obligation to construct the strongest social safety net possible, including healthcare, regulation of banks, energy solutions and campaign finance reform. If we don’t get this right, forget generational theft and call it generational death. They won’t be able to pay off our debts. They won’t be able to repay their own. They will not survive.
I am ashamed of us for our selfishness. Just as we knew our parents as the “Greatest Generation” they will know us as the “I Got Mine Generation.” Newsflash: The fight for the healthcare reform is not about you.

Julie A Racine • Marion

Hugely offended
As a former “fudgie”, but for the last 7 years, a “local”, I found the advertisements for the “Farewell to Fudgies” celebrations over Labor Day weekend to be hugely offensive. But, my own feelings and opinions aren’t nearly as important as those of the people who fall into this “fudgie” category.
This announcement of CELEBRATION, as the foundation of the Traverse City Area economy leaves our area, is a direct insult to the wonderful tourists and seasonal inhabitants who come to this area, stay for a few days to several months, all the while depositing their dollars into our restaurants, resorts, businesses and services.
I just hope that most of these people who support the Traverse City economy in many ways, do NOT have subscriptions to Northern Express for the “off season.” Perhaps they will be spared this obnoxious insult!

Chris Clute, Honor, MI
 
 
Close
Close
Close