Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Books

Books

 
Saturday, September 24, 2016

Get Literary At The New Harbor Springs Festival Of The Book

Books Kristi Kates Founded by a local group of fans of the written word, a new festival is launching in Harbor Springs in celebration of all things books. The idea behind the Harbor Springs Festival of the Book was simple: Create something unexpected that would put the city on the map as a literary hub.
 
Saturday, August 13, 2016

Five Great Beach Reads

Books Kristi Kates There’s still about a month of summer left, which means there’s plenty of time left to enjoy Michigan’s lakeside destinations. In addition to sunscreen and a cool beverage, you’ll of course need something to read — something light enough that lets you to pause for dips in the lake and ice cream breaks, then resume reading without missing a beat.
 
Saturday, August 6, 2016

National Writers Series: Big Season Ahead

Books Clark Miller GRANDMOTHERS WHO MAKE IT HAPPEN On Sept. 17 at Northwestern Michigan College’s Milliken Auditorium, legendary photojournalist Paola Gianturco will discuss her book, Grandmother Power: A Global Phenomenon. The book praises grandmas around the world who have done their part to protect native cultures, the environment, human rights and education.
 
Saturday, June 18, 2016

Region’s Book Events Flourish Through the Summer Months

Books Clark Miller Buying a few summer beach reads is fine for the casual book worm, but the dedicated book geek needs more. Lucky for you, literary events — including a singles mingle for book lovers in Gaylord — abound throughout the summer in northern Michigan. Dogear your calendar for these tome to-dos.
 
Saturday, May 28, 2016

Author Brian Castner Tells Story of Local War Hero Matthew Schwartz

Books Clark Miller journalist and former Air Force officer Brian Castner comes to the City Opera House at 7pm Thursday, June 2, to discuss his new book on a topic with a local connection — the life and death of Traverse City native, Air Force bomb tech Matthew Schwartz, who was killed in Afghanistan in January of 2012.
 
Saturday, November 21, 2015

'My Daddy Lives at War'

Books Clark Miller Local author Onalee Marsh’s new book, “Love & Kisses, Max: An Untold Story of World War II,” recounts her family’s World War II experiences through the dual lenses of her own experience as a young girl left behind and her father’s letters and journal, written while he was serving in the Pacific on the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown.
 
Monday, August 29, 2011

Tastemakers: Mode?s Bum Steer Rack of Lamb/Sierra Nevada Northern Hemisphere Harvest Ale

Books Rick Coates Mode’s Bum Steer Rack of Lamb
As I was reviewing my notes from my dining experiences over the past five years for an upcoming “State of the Northern Michigan Restaurant Industry” article, I constantly found Mode’s Bum Steer with positive reviews in my notes. In fact, in the 50-plus times I have dined at Mode’s over the past five years, I described each experience as exceptional.
Recently I met with Epicurean Classic founder Mark Dressler who is returning the event to Traverse City (September 8-11). Dressler pointed out that one deciding factor to return the event to the region was “the quality and commitment of the culinary scene in the area.”
With so many new offerings in the region, sometimes there might be a tendency to overlook the “classic” places like Mode’s, Hermann’s and the Rowe Inn.
Anita and her husband Bob opened Mode’s Bum Steer 36 years ago. Bob passed away four years ago this past July, but Anita and their daughter Skylar have kept the tradition going. In fact the whole team has kept that tradition of exceptional service and quality menu offerings going.
I stopped in last week to enjoy my favorite, their Rack of Lamb with a classic wedge and bleu cheese, and I overheard Anita talking about the fact that most of the staff has been with them for 20 to 30 years and the “newbies” take quickly to the Mode’s way of doing things.
 
Monday, August 22, 2011

Nothing More To Tell

Books Elizabeth Buzzelli Nothing More to Tell
Stories by George Dila
Mayapple Press
$15.95

By Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli

Once in a while you come across a book of stories so true you convince
yourself you’re reading memoir and you get mad or sad for the writer until
you remember this is fiction and you’re only getting pieces of a life and
maybe a made-up life. Then you get upset that you’ve been had so easily.
Then you understand what a good writer this is and you’re happy to be in
the hands of this magician and go on to the next story, the next life, and
the next twisting of your emotions.
 
Monday, August 15, 2011

TC, I Love Thee

Books Elizabeth Buzzelli The Traverse City Chamber of Commerce should be handing out Henry
Morgenstein’s new book, “TC, I Love Thee,” to every tourist and
prospective resident. Real Estate agents should buy cases of the books to
give as gifts at closings. If you would like to join in a song to our
beautiful area, this is that song.
Henry Morgenstein came to the United States in 1948 when he was brought to
New York City from first Belgium, and then Havana, Cuba. In 1971 he moved
to Traverse City, teaching English at Northwestern Michigan College for
the next 30 years until his retirement in 2001.
 
Monday, August 1, 2011

Suicide Sonnet

Books Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli Suicide Sonnet
A sheriff’s past revealed in Medieval Murders
Review: Medieval Murders
By Aaron Stander
Writers & Editors, LLC
$15.95

By Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli

Since reading the first book in the Ray Elkins series by Interlochen mystery writer, Aaron Stander, I’ve wondered about Ray. More than a capable sheriff in Cedar County, Michigan, Ray is quiet and caring and tenacious—but self-protective and slightly reluctant to open himself to anyone.
Ray’s a good cop. He always gets his man. He has eclectic tastes in music, literature and food (especially Stilton cheese), has good relationships with women, and is a thoroughly likeable man. But there was something more.
 
Monday, July 25, 2011

Misery Bay Probes an Unlikely Suicide

Books Glen Young Fictional sleuth Alex McKnight is back and his fans are pleased, but no
more so than his creator, Michigan-born author Steve Hamilton.
Returning in his eighth novel, McKnight ventures west from his home base
in Paradise to ominously named Misery Bay, where he is asked to
investigate the suicide of a college student, a young man who appeared to
have it all, but who instead hangs himself from a large, lonely tree near
the shores of Lake Superior.
 
Monday, July 11, 2011

Echoes

Books Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli A Civil War soldier wins an inner conflict in
Echoes
Echoes of Distant Thunder
By Frank P. Slaughter
Arbutus Press

By Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli

You’re going to like Will Castor. This simple Civil War soldier is going to captivate you and show you a very different kind of war. “Echoes of Distant Thunder” by Frank P. Slaughter isn’t one of those big Civil War books we’re all used to, but something much smaller and more personal, a look into the depths and scope of one man’s soul.
The story begins in 1971 with an inheritance coming to Paul, Will Castor’s great great grandson: an antique wooden box containing some old letters, a pocket watch, and a Civil War-era revolver. The watch, inscribed “Love Always, Mollie,” is a mystery as is Will’s tombstone with the word “Peep” carved beneath the Civil War designation of Pvt Bat D 1st Mich Art (Private in Battery D, 1st Michigan Artillary).
With these two mysteries in place we’re sent back in time. Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863. Another sleepless night for Union private, Will Castor, and a day of relentless battle. The Union is losing ground. They are withdrawing. Since just before daylight the cold, heavy air had carried the deep rumble of artillery fire to them from somewhere over on the left, and it had steadily increased in volume and urgency as the morning wore on.
The battle continued: The guns of Battery D were taking a terrible toll on the Confederates as they crossed the old cornfield, but they could not fire fast enough to stem the tide, and all six guns were running out of ammunition.
 
Monday, July 4, 2011

A stoner goes sleuthing in Wire to Wire

Books Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli Okay, Michigan’s in this book: Wire to Wire by Scott Sparling (Tin House Books).
Detroit. Hell. Traverse City. Charlevoix. Wolverine (not the real Wolverine, another Wolverine). So I get to review it. Here goes. Hold on to your seat.
Wire to Wire is called “a stunning homage to one of our most popular and enduring genres—the American Crime novel” by the publishers.
Oh yeah? Let’s just sink into this down and dirty mystery (?) with mean drug dealers and murdering creeps, with one stoned protagonist and his freight car jumping friend. Oh, and don’t forget the women—every single female character is dropped like mud on the page, for sex, for titillation, or to die. Their choice. Well, somebody’s choice.
 
Monday, June 27, 2011

Gateways offers a visionary trip to TC?s past

Books Robert Downes It only takes a few moments to fall under the spell of historian Richard Fidler’s “Gateways to Grand Traverse Past,” a beautifully-envisioned tale of the ups and downs of life dating back 100 years ago and beyond.
A former teacher, this is Fidler’s third book of history, primarily about the Grand Traverse region but in many ways roaming further afield. Here, for instance, are the scores of black hobos who traveled north on the rails in the 1940s, hoping to pick cherries in the region’s orchards, only to be succeeded by imported Jamaican labor and Mexican migrants. Here are tales of circuses which marched in a line of elephants down the muddy streets of Front Street in the 1890s. Fidler lifts history from its dusty grave and breathes life into the past through eloquent writing and intelligent observations full of perception and wonder.
 
Monday, June 27, 2011

Life in a Small, Superior Town

Books Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli South of Superior 
By Ellen Airgood
Riverhead Books/Penguin Group
$25.95

As small towns go, McAllaster, Michigan, isn’t much.  Typical UP town.  It’s got plain people, a lot of characters, a few newbies out to change a culture in place for a few hundred years, and some who just want to fit in.  This town’s got elderly sisters and down-at-the-heels oldsters who live off the land.  It’s got struggling businesses, and people with hope, and those without hope.  Everything small town’s have is here in McAllaster, the centerpiece of a first novel by Ellen Airgood, who runs a diner in Grand Marais, and captures people, places, life, and small stories writ large in “South of Superior.”
 
 
Close
Close
Close