Letters

Letters 08-29-2016

Religious Bigotry President Obama has been roundly criticized for his apparent unwillingness to use the term “radical Islamic terrorism.” His critics seem to suggest that through the mere use of that terminology, the defeat of ISIS would be assured...

TC DDA: Focus On Your Mission What on earth is the Traverse City DDA thinking? Purchasing land around (not within) its TIF boundaries and then offering it at a discount to developers? That is not its mission. Sadly enough, it is already falling down on the job regarding what is its mission. Crosswalks are deteriorating all around downtown, trees aren’t trimmed, sidewalks are uneven. Why can’t the DDA do a better job of maintaining what it already has? And still no public restrooms downtown, despite all the tax dollars captured since 1997. What a joke...

European-Americans Are Boring “20 Fascinating People” in northern Michigan -- and every single one is European-American? Sorry, but this is journalistically incorrect. It’s easy for editors to assign and reporters to write stories about people who are already within their personal and professional networks. It’s harder to dig up stuff about people you don’t know and have never met. Harder is better...

Be Aware Of Lawsuit While most non-Indians were sleep walking, local Odawa leaders filed a lawsuit seeking to potentially have most of Emmet County and part of Charlevoix County declared within their reservation and thus under their jurisdiction. This assertion of jurisdiction is embedded in their recently constructed constitution as documentation of their intent...

More Parking Headaches I have another comment to make about downtown TC parking following Pat Sullivan’s recent article. My hubby and I parked in a handicap spot (with a meter) behind Mackinaw Brew Pub for lunch. The handicap spot happens to be 8-10 spaces away from the payment center. Now isn’t that interesting...

Demand Change At Women’s Resource Center Change is needed for the Women’s Resource Center for the Grand Traverse Area (WRCGT). As Patrick Sullivan pointed out in his article, former employees and supporters don’t like the direction WRCGT has taken. As former employees, we are downright terrified at the direction Juliette Schultz and Ralph Soffredine have led the organization...

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Thursday, May 26, 2005

Don‘t Panic... The drama of James Kunstler‘s ‘Long Emergency‘ ignores details

Books Oran Kelley The excerpt from novelist James Kunstler’s new book, “The Long Emergency” (Express 4/14), is certainly interesting. But unlike letter writer Ann Rogers, I think we ought to hesitate a moment before we plan our whole lives around Mr. Kunstler’s predictions.
If you missed Kunstler’s piece, he claims that petroleum production has already peaked, that supplies will be well short of demand quite soon, and that the suburban middle class economy that has been built around cheap oil is going to collapse, along with civilization as we know it.
 
Thursday, May 12, 2005

Northcountry Books

Books Robert Downes Books
By Robert Downes

Colorful characters drive the plot of fictional Weneshkeen

“The Lake, the River & the Other Lake”
By Steve Amick
Pantheon Books

If you’ve ever longed for a Northern Michigan version of Garrison Keillor’s Lake Woebegone, then delve into the riddles of “The Lake, the River & the Other Lake” by Steve Amick.
Amick has created a town called Weneshkeen on the shores of Lake Michigan, weaving several stories together in a plot whose characters become close-knit by book’s end. He even drew a map of the town on the book’s cover, which should add to its intrigue factor at local bookstores.
 
Thursday, March 31, 2005

Story Test

Books Bob Part 1
 
Thursday, December 23, 2004

Husband-wife Team are no Strangers to the Woods

Books Author and wildlife photographer Carl Sams grew up on an island near the mouth of the Au Sable River in Northern Michigan and spent much of his time playing sports, hunting and fishing. Carl’s wife, Jean Stoick, was raised on a farm in Michigan’s thumb near Vassar. Both have a passion for wildlife and dedicate their books and movies to “those who protect wildlife and wild places.”
Last week, the Milford-based couple were in Northern Michigan promoting their 1999 children’s best-seller, “Stranger in the Woods,” along with their new book, “Lost in the Woods.” Both are lushly photographed visions of Northern Michigan’s wildlife adorned with simple tales of life in
the wild.
 
Thursday, November 4, 2004

The Book Club Revolution: Victoria Champagne Sutherland Turns a Page with TC Reads

Books Robert Downes Books are glorious vehicles, capable of transporting the reader to faraway lands, distant times and into the souls of other lives. To share that adventure, Victoria Champagne Sutherland launched the TC Reads program two years ago, bringing the light of literature to many new readers in the area. It’s an idea that dovetails nicely with the surge of interest in book clubs -- primarily enjoyed by women readers -- that is sweeping the nation.
An ardent proponent of reading, Victoria is the publisher of ForeWord magazine, a high quality trade journal which circulates reviews of independently published books to the movers & shakers of the bookworld. In ForeWord, a librarian or bookstore owner can read a review of, say, “The Pirate Queen” a book about legendary women of the sea, and decide whether to add it to her shelves. The magazine got started in 1998 when Sutherland left the Jenkins Group book distribution firm to team up with writers Anne Stanton and Mardi Link. “When we started, there were 50,000 books being published each year, and now there are 175,000,” Sutherland recalls.
 
Thursday, October 21, 2004

Dylan‘s Back Pages: Chronicles Recall the Odyssey of a Young Folksinger on the Rise

Books Robert Downes There’s an old story about a talking dog in a bar. No one remembers what the dog has to say -- what’s amazing is that a dog is talking at all.
Such is the case with Bob Dylan’s new autobiography, “Chronicles,” the first in a three-volume series that was released in early October. The marvel unveiled in the book is that for the past 44 years of his stellar career, Bob Dylan has been notoriously silent, obscure or cryptic at best on the meaning of his songs and just how he came to be arguably the greatest American songwriter of all time.
 
Thursday, October 14, 2004

The Glamour, Glory and Guardedness of Grant

Books Nancy Sundstrom Just in time for harvest season comes a bumper crop of books by and about celebrities of all sorts, from Hollywood royalty to those a little further down the feeding chain, such as Paris Hilton, Sean Astin and Tom Green.
Arguably, one can expect more from a biography spanning the four-decade career of Cary Grant than one can from Jenna Jameson’s “How to Make Love Like a Porn Star,” but one can assume caveat empteur here. It’s all a matter of taste, isn’t it? And let’s face it, don’t some of these tomes, such as the latter-mentioned above, at least intrigue a reader to pick it up in the bookstore and scan the back cover and the photos, even while hiding inside an open copy of Philip Roth’s latest?
 
Thursday, September 30, 2004

History Lesson: The Folly of Empire

Books Nancy Sundstrom As Election Day looms closer, there is no slowing of the steady stream of new books dedicated to a wide range of facets, perspectives and tales about the two candidates heading for what many believe will be one of the closest races in some time.
One of the latest of these tomes is a thoughtful, interesting and well-researched, though quite academic-minded, work by John Judis entitled “The Folly of Empire: What George W. Bush Could Learn from Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson.”
 
Thursday, September 16, 2004

The Agony and the Ecstasy of Being Committed

Books Nancy Sundstrom Summer is officially over, but that doesn’t seem tohave slowed down some solid offerings in the beach read department. In fact, one of the best of the season just rolled out in the form of Anna Maxted’s fourth novel, Being Committed.

This is the best effort yet from the English, bestselling Maxted (Getting Over It, Behaving Like Adults, Running in Heels), who has endeared readers and critics alike with her own unique blend of heartache, hope and hope, particularly as it applies to romance. Maxted has a true gift for creating endearing characters and flushing out optimism and warmth from dismal situations. These gifts as a writer have aided not only in raising her to the forefront of chick lit authors, but elevating regard and standards for the genre itself.
 
Thursday, September 9, 2004

Is 15 Minutes of Fame too Much or too Little?

Books Nancy Sundstrom Four years ago, Salon columnist and playwright Cintra Wilson wrote a book that had a title so provocative that I, along with many others, couldn’t help but pick it up and dive right in: “A Massive Swelling: Celebrity Reexamined as a Grotesque and Crippling Disease.”
Every edgy, insightful and slightly vicious moment in her non-fiction diatribe on pop culture (with observations and predictions on the likes of Michael Jackson proving to be nearly Nostradamean) made the book worth every penny and paved the way for more to look forward to in terms of why we, as individuals and a society, are pop culture junkies whom 15 minutes of fame is - well - either too much or too little, depending on your perspective. At the altar of this line of thinking, I just throw in the names of William Hung, Paris Hilton and Joey Buttafucco as a case in point.
 
Thursday, August 26, 2004

Pure Joy in the Form of Corduroy

Books Nancy Sundstrom “How many people do you have to kill before you no longer qualify as pro-life?” read a homemade sign carried by one young man.
“Stop depleting my dating pool,” read another carried by a young woman who wanted to draw attention to the U.S. military’s death toll in Iraq -- now approaching 950.
Traverse City has always been known as a Republican stronghold, but last Monday -- in what local historian Larry Wakefield termed the largest demonstration in the city’s history -- over 1,000 people gathered to protest a campaign appearance by George W. Bush.
Captain Morgan of the Traverse City Police Department estimated the crowd of demonstrators at between 1,000 and 1,500.
For hours before Bush was scheduled to speak, those with tickets to the rally (organizers say 14,000 tickets were handed out) filed into the Civic Center along a sidewalk flanked by a crowd carrying signs and energetically speaking out about the war, job loss, environmental degradation, reproductive freedom and other civil rights issues.
 
Thursday, August 19, 2004

Secret Studies -- The Hazards of Reading Lolita in Tehran

Books Nancy Sundstrom Recently released in paperback is a book that deserved more attention than it earned when it was released in hardcover late last year. The tome has the provocative title of “Reading Lolita in Tehran,” and it has been rightfully hailed by other critics as a powerful and moving merge of memoir, political commentary and literary criticism. Though it is hardly a beach read, the fact that it is now available in paperback might help bring this insightful and provocative book the audience it should have had from the onset.
 
Thursday, August 5, 2004

Burgermeister Bob Serves Up a Great Book

Books Anne Stanton Bob Sloan, perhaps one of the area’s most prolific writers, has just published a great new cookbook for burger lovers: “Great Burgers: Mouthwatering Recipes.”
 
Thursday, August 5, 2004

Kerry & Edwards: The Right Stuff on the Write Stuff

Books Nancy Sundstrom In early July, as something of a primer for last week’s viewings of the Democratic National Convention, I finally got around to reading two books that had been on my nightstand for the past few months: “Four Trials” by John Edwards and “Tour of Duty: John Kerry and the Vietnam War.”
 
Thursday, August 5, 2004

Regional Book ROUNDUP

Books Nancy Sundstrom Local authors offer everything from poetry to postcards
In our fast-paced world, sometimes the majority of us can forget about how great it really is to crack open a book. In Northern Michigan there are a number of gifted authors who have works encompassing subjects from cooking to farming to photography. This summer offers a number of new texts from area authors that deserve attention:
 
 
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