Letters

Letters 08-25-14

Save America

I read your paper because it’s free and I enjoy the ads. But I struggle through the left wing tripe that fills every page, from political cartoons to the vitriolic pen of Mr. Tuttle. What a shame this beautiful area of the state has such an abundance of Socialist/democrats. Or perhaps the silent majority chooses to stay silent...

Doom, Yet a Cup Half Full

In the news we are told of the civil unrest at Ferguson, Mo; ISIS war radicals in Iraq and Syria; the great corporate tax heist at home. You name it. Trouble, trouble, everywhere. It seems to me the U.S. Congress is partially to blame...

Uncomfortable Questions

defending the positions of the Israelis vs Hamas are far too narrow. Even Mr. Tuttle seems to have failed in looking deeply into the divide. American media is not biased against Israel, nor or are they pro Palestine or Hamas...

The Evolution of Man Revisited

As the expectations of manhood evolve, so too do the rules of love. In Mr. Holmes’s statement [from “Our Therapist Will See Us Now” in last week’s issue] he narrows the key to a successful relationship to the basic need to have your wants and needs understood, and it is on this point I expand...

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Thursday, July 10, 2003

Dry is Anything But

Books Nancy Sundstrom After surviving James Frey’s powerful and harrowing “A Million Little Pieces,“ I thought it might be a while before I delved into an addiction saga again, but the buzz (no pun intended) for “Dry: A Memoir“ by Augusten Burroughs has been so strong, that it looked like it shouldn’t be ignored.
 
Thursday, June 26, 2003

The Da Vinci Code is a Work of Art

Books Nancy Sundstrom Dan Brown’s “The Da Vinci Code“ is so smart and sharp that you will raise your I.Q. by reading it. And you won’t be able to stop turning the pages in the process. I promise.
 
Thursday, June 19, 2003

30 Things Everyone Should Know How to Do Before Turning 30... or any age, for that matter

Books A.T. Jakeway Do you know how to ask for a raise? Can you cure a hangover, carve a turkey, or parallel park? Can you make dogs and cats love you? Can you change a diaper, or build a successful campfire? Do you know how to dance a “slow dance“ without looking like an idiot?
 
Thursday, June 19, 2003

Cosmopolis, Anyone?

Books Nancy Sundstrom Many in the literary world wondered how Don DeLillo was going to top his last effort, the sprawling, muscular masterpiece named “Underworld.“ But we should have known to look for a surprise. In “Cosmopolis,“ his 13th novel, he spins a tale that is taught, intimate and tightly controlled. In may not be “Underworld,“ but then, what could be?
 
Thursday, June 12, 2003

Mountains of Books for Great Summer Beach Reads

Books Nancy Sundstrom There are mountains of new books that look to be great summer beach reads, so as you start listing the reasons to look forward to summer or the plans you have for the season, sizzling summer books ought to at least make a decent showing.
 
Thursday, June 5, 2003

Masters of Doom: How the Lennon and McCartney of Video Games Transformed Pop Culture

Books Nancy Sundstrom You may not know the names John Carmack and John Romero, but chances are excellent that you’ve had some kind of encounter with what they did to mastermind a major industry and shape a generation.
 
Thursday, May 29, 2003

Caramelo - As Rich, Intriguing, and Delightful as it Sounds

Books Nancy Sundstrom “Tell me a story, even if it’s a lie,“ begins “Caramelo.“ To the great delight of the reader, what author Sandra Cisneros delivers is not the latter, because feels far too real for that, but the former, in spades.
 
Thursday, May 22, 2003

Notes from the Underground

Books Nancy Sundstrom Most readers of Eric Schlosser’s 2001 best seller “Fast Food Nation“ found themselves bewildered, outraged, horrified, and called to rise up in action, and appropriately so. Those who tackle his latest expose, “Reefer Madness: Sex, Drugs, and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market“ can count on having the same sort of reaction.
 
Thursday, May 15, 2003

Take a Ride on the Baghdad Express

Books Nancy Sundstrom In the summer of 1990, writer Joel Turnipseed was adrift and aimless. He was homeless, and had been unceremoniously kicked out of a college philosophy program and dumped by his girlfriend. Being AWOL from his Marine Corps Reserve unit for more than three months and spending day after day hanging out in coffee shops were also on his list of dubious achievements.
 
Thursday, May 8, 2003

An Addict Torn into A Million Little Pieces

Books Nancy Sundstrom I don’t know whether to give this next statement a caveat, or simply make it. I have just now decided to opt for the latter.
 
Thursday, May 1, 2003

A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide

Books Nancy Sundstrom This year‘s coveted Pulitzer Prize for General Non-fiction went to Samantha Power’s “A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide,“ a gripping, heartbreaking saga of the years she spent as a journalist covering the grisly events in Bosnia and Srebrenica, circa 1993-1996.
 
Thursday, April 17, 2003

Tune In and Turn On to Drop City

Books Nancy Sundstrom Singer-songwriter Greg Brown has a wonderful line about most baby boomers being a “cross between our parents and hippies in a tent,“ and if that sentiment rings at all true for you, you’ll find it beautifully reinforced in T. Coraghessan Boyle’s fabulous new novel, “Drop City.“
 
Thursday, April 10, 2003

Fresh Treatments on the Age-old Battle of the Sexes

Books Nancy Sundstrom The good, the bad, the ugly, and the downright laughable about the business of life as it applies to relationships and family all get a fresh perspective in two new books from writers who obviously know the terrain well.
 
Thursday, April 3, 2003

Survival Guides for a Brave, New World

Books Nancy Sundstrom Been stocking up on duct tape Viscleen, bottled water, and gas masks? Thought about it?
It is not a coincidence that a crop of new and re-released books have hit bookshelves that deal with tips for surviving a staggering array of emergencies, be they biological, chemical, nuclear, or worse. Not surprisingly, these somber tomes are selling well, causing publishers to have a growing belief that there’s a market for advice of this sort, especially as talk of a potential war in Iraq looms closer every day.
 
Thursday, March 27, 2003

The Master Butcher‘s Singing Club is a Soaring American Aria

Books Nancy Sundstrom Louise Erdrich‘s mixed German-American, French, and Ojibwe Indian heritage has played an important role in the eight other novels she has written, but never before has it come as sharply into focus as it has in her latest effort, an unforgettable epic entitled “The Master Butchers Singing Club.“
 
 
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