Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

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Thursday, May 8, 2003

An Addict Torn into A Million Little Pieces

Books Nancy Sundstrom I don’t know whether to give this next statement a caveat, or simply make it. I have just now decided to opt for the latter.
 
Thursday, May 1, 2003

A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide

Books Nancy Sundstrom This year‘s coveted Pulitzer Prize for General Non-fiction went to Samantha Power’s “A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide,“ a gripping, heartbreaking saga of the years she spent as a journalist covering the grisly events in Bosnia and Srebrenica, circa 1993-1996.
 
Thursday, April 17, 2003

Tune In and Turn On to Drop City

Books Nancy Sundstrom Singer-songwriter Greg Brown has a wonderful line about most baby boomers being a “cross between our parents and hippies in a tent,“ and if that sentiment rings at all true for you, you’ll find it beautifully reinforced in T. Coraghessan Boyle’s fabulous new novel, “Drop City.“
 
Thursday, April 10, 2003

Fresh Treatments on the Age-old Battle of the Sexes

Books Nancy Sundstrom The good, the bad, the ugly, and the downright laughable about the business of life as it applies to relationships and family all get a fresh perspective in two new books from writers who obviously know the terrain well.
 
Thursday, April 3, 2003

Survival Guides for a Brave, New World

Books Nancy Sundstrom Been stocking up on duct tape Viscleen, bottled water, and gas masks? Thought about it?
It is not a coincidence that a crop of new and re-released books have hit bookshelves that deal with tips for surviving a staggering array of emergencies, be they biological, chemical, nuclear, or worse. Not surprisingly, these somber tomes are selling well, causing publishers to have a growing belief that there’s a market for advice of this sort, especially as talk of a potential war in Iraq looms closer every day.
 
Thursday, March 27, 2003

The Master Butcher‘s Singing Club is a Soaring American Aria

Books Nancy Sundstrom Louise Erdrich‘s mixed German-American, French, and Ojibwe Indian heritage has played an important role in the eight other novels she has written, but never before has it come as sharply into focus as it has in her latest effort, an unforgettable epic entitled “The Master Butchers Singing Club.“
 
Thursday, March 20, 2003

Jack the Ripper - Case Closed?

Books Nancy Sundstrom “No doubt there will always be skeptics, and critics tainted by self-interest who will refuse to accept that [Walter] Sickert was a serial killer, a damaged diabolical man driven by megalomania and hate. There will be those who will argue that it’s all coincidence. As FBI profiler Ed Sulzbach says, ‘There really aren’t many coincidences in life. And to call coincidence after coincidence after coincidence a coincidence is just plain stupid.“
—Patricia Cornwell, Portrait of a Killer
 
Thursday, March 13, 2003

Proulx Plays the Right Cards in That Old Ace in the Hole

Books Nancy Sundstrom One of the great joys of reading iin the recent years has been settling in with the latest effort from Annie Proulx, the author of wonderful tales of hardworking scrappers constantly down on their look, such as “The Shipping News, “Close Range,““Postcards,“ and “Accordion Crimes.“
 
Thursday, March 6, 2003

A Home Run and a Slam Dunk in Two Must-reads

Books Nancy Sundstrom This past fall, two acclaimed books on sports arrived on the literary scene - one a biography about one of the legendary figures of baseball written by a respected female sports journalist, the other a memoir set against the backdrop of basketball penned by a best-selling author.
 
Thursday, February 27, 2003

A Trek Across the Map of Cool

Books Nancy Sundstrom hip••ster - \hip-stur (s)\ n. One who possesses tastes, social attitudes, and opinions deemed cool by the cool. (Note: it is no longer recommended that one use the term “cool“; a Hipster would instead say “deck.“) The Hipster walks among the masses in daily life but is not a part of them and shuns or reduces to kitsch anything held dear by the mainstream. A Hipster ideally possesses no more than 2% body fat.
 
Thursday, February 20, 2003

Hot off the Presses, and Hot, Period

Books Nancy Sundstrom The film “Chicago“ is burning up movie screens all over the country, and in the publishing industry, a Windy City tome entitled “The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America“ is not just hot-off-the-presses, but hot period.
 
Wednesday, February 12, 2003

Hollywood Tell-Alls - Again

Books Nancy Sundstrom Curling up with a hot tell-all about Hollywood isn‘t a bad way to pass a cold winter‘s night, and there are a few new ones out there that fit the bill quite nicely.

“Hollywood Animal: A Memoir“ by Joe Eszterhas
Hands down, this is the most entertaining of the bunch, and certainly the most outrageous. If his name doesn‘t ring a bell, then some of his credits should. Eszterhas has a reputation as a highly overpaid and moderately talented scribe who has made an indelible contribution to world culture with screenplays like “Basic Instinct,“ “Jade,“ “Jagged Edge,“ “Flashdance“ and, most notably, “Showgirls.“ As a result, he‘s become both the most famous - and infamous - scribe in Hollywood.
 
Thursday, February 6, 2003

Great Samaritan

Books Nancy Sundstrom It has been four years since Richard Price wrote his last book, the vastly underrated “Freedomland,“ which was a follow-up to the brilliant “Clockers.“ For those, like this reviewer, who had to tough out the wait, the promise of good things to come began with the fact that Price had returned to the muse he has found in the fictional setting of Dempsey, New Jersey. Dempsey is the blighted, gritty city that has served as the backdrop for his past three novels, and just like those tour-de-force works of urban drama and despair, his newest, “Samaritan,“ builds its moral complexity from the streets on up to create a modern parable.
 
Thursday, January 30, 2003

Sharing the Hours with Mrs. Dalloway: Two takes on the Tragic Virginia Woolf

Books Nancy Sundstrom “There‘s just this for consolation: an hour here or there when our lives seem, against all odds and expectations, to burst open and give us everything we‘ve ever imagined.... Still, we cherish the city, the morning; we hope, more than anything, for more.“ – Virginia Woolf, “Mrs. Dalloway“

With the recent Golden Globe wins and predicted Oscar nominations for Stephen Daldry’s “The Hours,“ media and literary attention allover the world has made a cause celebre out of Michael Cunningham’s acclaimed, Pulitzer Prize-winning novel 1998 novel of the same name, and Virginia Woolf’s “Mrs. Dalloway,’ the 1925 book on which “The Hours“ is based.
 
Thursday, January 23, 2003

A True Blue Cop Thriller

Books Nancy Sundstrom If you read this column, you‘ve probably assumed, and I believe correctly so, that I love books and for the most part, am not a snob about them.
But a title like “Final Justice“ makes me nervous for some reason, perhaps because it evokes slightly coherent memories of cheezy movies starring the likes of Joe Don Baker and most of the ensemble cast of the first “Billy Jack“ opus that I went with high school buddies to see at drive-ins during the big, bad, beloved early 1970‘s, when the point was always (if unspoken) that little watching of the “film“ would occur.
 
 
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