Letters

Letters 08-29-2016

Religious Bigotry President Obama has been roundly criticized for his apparent unwillingness to use the term “radical Islamic terrorism.” His critics seem to suggest that through the mere use of that terminology, the defeat of ISIS would be assured...

TC DDA: Focus On Your Mission What on earth is the Traverse City DDA thinking? Purchasing land around (not within) its TIF boundaries and then offering it at a discount to developers? That is not its mission. Sadly enough, it is already falling down on the job regarding what is its mission. Crosswalks are deteriorating all around downtown, trees aren’t trimmed, sidewalks are uneven. Why can’t the DDA do a better job of maintaining what it already has? And still no public restrooms downtown, despite all the tax dollars captured since 1997. What a joke...

European-Americans Are Boring “20 Fascinating People” in northern Michigan -- and every single one is European-American? Sorry, but this is journalistically incorrect. It’s easy for editors to assign and reporters to write stories about people who are already within their personal and professional networks. It’s harder to dig up stuff about people you don’t know and have never met. Harder is better...

Be Aware Of Lawsuit While most non-Indians were sleep walking, local Odawa leaders filed a lawsuit seeking to potentially have most of Emmet County and part of Charlevoix County declared within their reservation and thus under their jurisdiction. This assertion of jurisdiction is embedded in their recently constructed constitution as documentation of their intent...

More Parking Headaches I have another comment to make about downtown TC parking following Pat Sullivan’s recent article. My hubby and I parked in a handicap spot (with a meter) behind Mackinaw Brew Pub for lunch. The handicap spot happens to be 8-10 spaces away from the payment center. Now isn’t that interesting...

Demand Change At Women’s Resource Center Change is needed for the Women’s Resource Center for the Grand Traverse Area (WRCGT). As Patrick Sullivan pointed out in his article, former employees and supporters don’t like the direction WRCGT has taken. As former employees, we are downright terrified at the direction Juliette Schultz and Ralph Soffredine have led the organization...

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Monday, March 3, 2008

Skinny Bitch

Books Robert Downes It was just an obscure diet book on the shelves a little over a year ago, but today, Skinny Bitch and its sister publication Skinny Bitch in the Kitch
are two of the fattest books on the bestseller charts.
Specifically, Skinny Bitch has spent the past 30 weeks at the top of the New York Times Paperback Advice Bestseller List, with Skinny Bitch in the Kitch weighing in at number four, along with nine weeks on the list.
Both books offer “vegan diet advice from the world of modeling.” Author Rory Freedman is a former agent for Ford Models and a “self-taught know-it-all,” while Kim Barnouin is a former model who holds an MS degree in holistic nutrition.
 
Monday, February 18, 2008

Black Hole

Books Robert Downes If you’ve never read a graphic novel before, then “Black Hole” by Charles Burns is a wake-up call as to how disturbing and provocative these steroid-packed comic books can be.
Hailed as the masterwork of a comics superstar, “Black Hole” is a frightening trip into a nightmare of teenage anxieties, rendered with drawings that recall the darkness of both Rembrandt and Dracula.
The story involves a bizarre plague that infects a group of teenagers in the Seattle area during the 1970s -- a time when “it wasn’t exactly cool to be a hippie any more, but David Bowie was still just a little too weird.”
 
Monday, February 11, 2008

Why Mars & Venus collide

Books Robert Downes Is your relationship cosmically stressed out? Is a meteor shower of
hassles and time-pressure tearing up your world of love and commitment?
Is your rocket to romance stalled on the launching pad because you can’t
choose between Mars and Venus as a destination?
If so, you may wish to consult “Why Mars & Venus Collide,” the latest
self-help book for relationships by space explorer and love coach John
Gray.
 
Thursday, December 20, 2007

Local Pageturners

Books Rick Coates It’s that time again - time for last minute gift buying. If you are in that market, consider buying something made local, such as wine, works of art, functional handcrafted art (pottery, clothing, leather goods) or value added agricultural products from local family owned farms. Another great idea is books, and certainly going to the New York Times’ Best Seller list assures giving a book that has attained at least some national status; but why not consider giving a book from a Northern Michigan author? Even consider giving yourself a book - after all, you deserve a gift.
Northern Michigan has long been a haven for writers and authors. Certainly most notable is Hemingway, whose early writings were shaped and inspired by his time spent in the Petoskey and Walloon Lake areas as well as the Upper Peninsula. Then there is Jim Harrison (happy birthday to Jim, who last week joined his good friend Jack Nicholson in reaching the 70-year-olds club), who spent most of his adult writing life living on the Leelanau Peninsula. Harrison has a new book out as well (from last winter), titled Returning To Earth.
 
Thursday, October 25, 2007

Night Work

Books Glen Young Way out East, in Cottekill, New York, author Steve Hamilton is likely sitting down, even tonight, to begin his new novel.
Hamilton, a Michigan native who has called New York’s Catskills Mountain region home since his 1983 graduation from U of M, is well known to Michigan mystery fans. Since the early success of 1998’s “A Cold Day in Paradise,” Hamilton has penned six other novels starring retired Detroit policeman Alex McKnight. But his most recent success finds Hamilton leaving McKnight and Paradise behind for his adopted home of New York.
“Night Work” marks a breakout for Hamilton; a first commercial departure from his tried and tested fictional series. This time, instead of the slushy confines of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in winter, Hamilton’s story takes place in the Hudson River valley region of New York, near his own home. It’s a murder mystery in which the main character struggles both to exonerate himself and catch the killer.
 
Thursday, July 5, 2007

A Thousand Bones

Books Rick Coates Northern Michigan has served as the backdrop and inspiration to many a writer and author. Most notable on the list are Ernest Hemingway and Jim Harrison. Add to that list New York Times bestselling author P.J. Parrish.
Parrish is the author of the critically-acclaimed and commercially successful Louis Kincaid mystery novel series, which uses the the Leelanau Peninsula as the setting to launch a new crime novel series featuring Joe Frye, a female police officer and Kincaid’s lover. The new novel, “A Thousand Bones,” was released last week and Parrish is touring through Northern Michigan doing a series of book signings.
 
 
Thursday, June 21, 2007

Killing Che

Books Robert Downes Walk into any tourist t-shirt shop on the planet and you’re likely to find the brooding image of Che Guevera in his star-topped black beret, ready to enlist the wanna-be revolutionaries of the world into what is now little more than a fashion statement.
But in his day, Che Guevera was a young man who shook the world as one of a handful of guerillas who waged a successful revolution in Cuba with Fidel Castro. He was a 34-year-old idealist who dreamed of exporting the same revolutionary tactics to South America when he was gunned down by the Bolivian army working with the Central Intelligence Agency in 1967.
But who was Che? The fun-loving young doctor of “The Motorcycle Diaries,” or the communist icon who talked a good game of freedom, but was just as willing to crush Cuba’s free press after the revolution?
Author Chuck Pfarrer offers some answers in his first novel, “Killing Che,” which is based on the revolutionary’s own field diaries. That, and Pfarrer’s own background as a former Navy SEAL, which provides some behind-the-scenes insight into how the CIA’s covert campaign against Che may have gone down.
 
Thursday, June 7, 2007

Tom Wright‘s Roadwork

Books Rick Coates Editors Note: Rick Coates detailed Tom Wright’s biography in a two-part article that appears in the archive section of northernexpress.com beginning with the August 28, 2003 issue. Tom Wright moved to Northern Michigan in 2000 to collect his thoughts and organize his photo archives. Coates also served as project facilitator for Tom Wright’s “Knew and Used Photography,” the international debut of Wright’s photographic collection, in November of 2003. The exhibition (one of the most successful in the history of the Dennos Museum) attracted thousands, including several rock stars (Rod Stewart, Uncle Kracker, Bob Seger and Ian McLagan), to Traverse City. Coates also edited the “Exhibition” catalogue that featured several of Wright’s best photos. For additional information on Tom Wright,visit tomwrightphotography.com.

 
Thursday, May 17, 2007

On the road with an Irish Pirate/Ramor Ryan

Books Holly Wren Spaulding In anticipation of his appearance in Traverse City next week, Irish author Ramor Ryan took time out to talk about his new book, Clandestines: The Pirate Journals of an Irish Exile, life in a conflict zone, and his political coming of age during the embattled Ireland of the 1980s.

NE: I understand you’ve read in Ireland, England, Germany, Mexico, New York, San Francisco — we’re lucky to make it onto your tour.
Ramor Ryan: I have to say that I have wanted to visit Traverse City for many years, as I have very special connections with the community there!

 
Thursday, May 10, 2007

Love Blooms Anew/Liesel Lizenburger

Books Glen Young Writer Liesel Litzenburger is enjoying a success little witnessed in her business.
Litzenburger, a newly-40 blonde who grew up in Harbor Springs and now calls the Grand Rapids area home, can credit some of her good fortune to nine-year-old Annie Child.
Annie, the diminutive heroine of Litzenburger’s new collection of linked stories Now You Love Me, has been rediscovered. First published in 2001 by Carnegie Mellon University Press, Now You Love Me has become not only Litzenburger’s first book but also her second, thanks to its recent re-publication by new publisher Shaye Areheart.
 
Thursday, April 12, 2007

Book Roundup

Books Robert Downes Self-publishing has become a cottage industry in Northern Michigan with a slew of do-it-yourself authors making their mark on the literary world.
Here’s an update on who’s doing what on the shelves of local bookstores, borrowing freely from the authors’ press releases:

Murder in the Keweenaw
By Harley Sachs

 
Thursday, March 15, 2007

When Things Fall Apart

Books Anne Stanton I was at an Interlochen Pathfinder School ice skating party recently when my eye caught the name of a book left on a folding chair: When Things Fall Apart by Pema Chodron, a Buddhist nun.
As it turns out the book belonged to a woman who formed a “Chodron” book study group with two other women. One of the moms at the skating party asked if
she could join the group. I was tempted to ask, too.
 
Thursday, March 1, 2007

Signal achievement ... Anne-Marie Oomen

Books Robert Downes Anne-Marie Oomen is one of those irresistible writers whose work always packs a surprise. A poet and a playwright with the easyAA warmth that comes from a country upbringing, she weaves an endlessly inventive orbit, enveloping the sphere of life in rural Northern Michigan.
Her latest work is “Uncoded Woman,” a collection of more than 60 poems. The poems tell the story of a young woman named Bead, who is “running away from her life in a stolen pickup.”
Bead (short for Beatrice) seems to be seeking shelter from the storm of her life with a new beginning along the coast of Lake Michigan. She picks up a Native American hitch-hiker named Barn and accepts his invitation to stay at his trailer in the Glen Arbor area (we know because they have “charred burgers at Art’s Bar”). Under her new friend’s guidance, Bead renews her life, learning to fish on Lake Michigan.
Accompanying each poem is a semaphore message from the maritime “International Code of Symbols” used to signal ships at sea in the days before radio. Bead stumbles across the codebook at the lifesaving station in Glen Haven in Leelanau County and recognizes its blunt signals as metaphors for the perplexities of her own life. When she discovers a body floating in the lake, the cumulative codes help build a sense of drama and suspense in the reader’s mind. The mystery forces Bead to face her own demons. How will she decode her own life?

 
Thursday, February 15, 2007

Got Energy?

Books Robert Downes Got Energy
Moving away from fossil fuels and nuclear power is the goal of author Hermann Scheer, whose book, “Energy Autonomy” (EARTHSCAN 2007) finds the solution in a scattershot reliance on renewable energy schemes.
A member of the German Bundestag (parliament) and president of the European Association for Renewable Energy, the author is also chairman of the World Council for Renewable Energy.
With credentials like those, it’s no wonder Scheer is passionate in the search for alternative sources of power, including biofuels, solar and wind power, to replace the destructive aspects of burning coal or building new nuclear power plants. Scheer argues for a decentralized approach to providing local power, using renewable sources that are close to home.
“Energy Autonomy” is not an easy read; it’s scholarly in tone and Scheer lacks Al Gore’s skill at putting zest in his subject. Perhaps it’s the translation. But if you’re charged up over the quest for a new way to power the world, this “Hero for the Green Century” (Time Magazine) offers an encyclopedic overview.
 
Thursday, February 1, 2007

Gruesome Mio murders

Books Rick Coates In 1985 when two buddies from the Detroit suburbs ventured north to go deer hunting, their expectations were like many who come to Northern Michigan for a weekend getaway. A chance to enjoy the solitude the area offers and an opportunity to escape the “big city.” When Brian Ognjan and David Tyll didn’t return from their weekend excursion, their family and friends expected foul play.
They were correct, but it would take investigators nearly 18 years to solve this gruesome crime. Writer Tom Henderson – who splits his time between a one-room schoolhouse home east of Traverse City and in the Detroit suburb of St. Clair Shores – captured this spellbinding tale of two senseless and grisly murders near the small Ausable River community of Mio, in his book “Darker Than Night”.
Henderson’s book is part of the popular St. Martin’s True Crime Library Series and was published in the fall
of 2006.
 
 
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