Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


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Art

 
Thursday, June 15, 2006

Seven shows to watch this summer

Art Jane Louise Boursaw In the good old days, summer TV was a wasteland of reruns and more reruns. We were better off playing outside than watching rehashed eps of “Leave it to Beaver.”
But TV has grown up and so have we. Now we can plant our butts firmly on the couch all summer, smug in the fact that we’re watching NEW shows. Here’s a peek at seven shows that’ll save you from the trauma of all those camping and kayaking trips.

 
Thursday, June 15, 2006

Mackinaw Theatre goes down Rock‘s Road

Art Carina Hume If you long for the rock ‘n’ roll glory days of the 1950s, they’re just a short drive away. Six days a week, the smokin’ piano of Jerry Lee Lewis, the gyrating hips of Elvis and many other ’50s icons command Mackinaw Theater’s stage.
Don’t expect any poodle skirts or bobby socks here. The “Heroes of Rock ‘N’ Roll” strive to captivate audiences with its authenticity and influential rock sound.
“We were looking to capture this essence of the music, the soul of the music, the thing that made [it] so raw and powerful for its time…,” says 22-year-old writer, producer and performer in the show, Dean Z, who had a hand in every aspect of it.
 
Thursday, June 8, 2006

Experience the Glow, The Bullfrog Light Company

Art Kristi Kates There’s a real art form to creating quality candles, and few people realize that there’s a company right here in Northern Michigan that crafts beautiful candles from scratch.
Bill Stewart, who was living near Saginaw at the time, started Bullfrog Light Company in 1981, after playing around with making candles as part of a school project he was doing with his kids.  His kids soon became distracted and moved on to other endeavors - but Bill, fascinated by the process, continued his pursuit of the perfect candle for several years.
Working with high-quality wax, he soon developed a method by which he could make candles that would glow from top to bottom, unlike most candles which primarily glow only where the top of the wick is located.  Succeeding at this twist on the traditional candle was all it took for Stewart to decide that his creations might make a great commercial venture. 
But, of course, a new candle company needed a standout name.
“Since it was spring, the bullfrogs in the nearby Shiawassee Flats Game Refuge were very loud,” chuckled Betsy Stewart, “so that seemed the natural name for the company.”
And so Bullfrog Light Company was born.  The company started off slow but within about four years, it was obvious that the original manufacturing site was too small, so Bullfrog Light Co. moved up north to Charlevoix.

 
Thursday, May 25, 2006

Happy Art

Art Kristi Kates When Mary Hramiec was in high school, she was locker neighbors - alphabetical, mind you - with a boy named Mark Hoffman.  Math aficionado Mark and artistic Mary, who met at Petoskey High, became good friends, and, much like the Family Channel TV movies would have you believe happens to everyone, they grew up and got married after college.  Partners both in marraige and in business, they‘ve slowly built their Hramiec Hoffman Studio and Gallery from the ground up, and now, it‘s one of the very first (and most noticeable) businesses to greet you on your drive into Harbor Springs.
 
Thursday, May 25, 2006

Chary Hansen‘s Art Works Alliance

Art Rick Coates  Last December Traverse City artist Charly Hansen convened a group of artist friends at his home.  Hansen, a long-time advocate of the local arts community, felt that there was disconnect among area visual artists and something needed to change. So a couple of dozen artist friends gathered at Hansen’s home studio, drank coffee, and discussed the importance of staying connected with each other, offering support and creating opportunities to exhibit works. Born out of that meeting was the Art Works Alliance.
“We really are a support group for area artists,” said Angela Saxon, an artist who maintains the group’s blog on the Internet. “Many of us spend our days in solitude in our studios so we need that human interaction from time to time.”
Art Works Alliance will introduce
 
Thursday, May 18, 2006

From Pain to Hope

Art Carina Hume A face with big blue eyes stares out from the canvas, marred by tears and a bright pink X where a smile should have been. The young girl, without a voice or a sense of place, is another casualty in the aftermath of a loved-one’s addiction.
The story is one of many illustrated by life-sized colorful canvases, shadow boxes and words of remembrance, to highlight the art exhibit, “From Pain to Hope.”
The exhibit opens May 13 in the lower level gallery of the Crooked Tree Arts Center in downtown Petoskey. It’s supported by a grant from the Petoskey-Harbor Springs Area Community Foundation.
 
Thursday, May 11, 2006

Festival of Tables

Art Anne Stanton Carol Murray’s body was badly broken 11 years ago in a car accident. Unable to walk or even talk above a whisper for a couple of years, she spent long days soaking up healing energy from Old Mission Peninsula’s aquamarine waters. Just when she started feeling normal – except for the chronic pain that still plagues her – she was diagnosed with cancer.
You might say Murray’s life is a metaphor of Festival of Tables, a huge event coming up on Saturday, May 13. For most of the day, 800 women pack a huge hall of the Grand Traverse Resort. They sip on champagne and wine, enjoy a gourmet lunch, chat, and bid on boutique jewelry and indulgences for all the senses. It’s a day for women to admire the creativity of volunteers who have spent literally hundreds of hours creating tables—miniature worlds of beauty, and imagination and possibility.
 
Thursday, May 11, 2006

The Quilt Maker

Art Anne Stanton After my husband used to rearrange the living room furniture just so, he’d joke: “I’m a man and a woman, too!”
In artistic terms, the same could be said of David Lint, M.D., only he is a little older and has achieved great things with… quilts. You can see his creations hanging in the spacious, historic corridor of the Minervini Group offices until May 19th.Prepare to be amazed, even if you’re not a quilt aficionado.
They were created by an amazing man. Lint, a retired orthopaedic surgeon, is a rare breed, a renaissance guy. He enjoys bird hunting with his arthritic dog, hunting for morels, and ski racing. He plays classical violin and once tried to raise ostriches (but not successfully).
 
Thursday, May 11, 2006

Rodin

Art When one thinks of sculpture, one name towers above all others: Auguste Rodin is to bronze what William Shakespeare is to theatre or Robert Johnson is to the blues.
So a new exhibit, “Rodin: In His Own Words,” offers a rare chance to see the work of the French master of the human form at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City. The exhibit, which opened April 29 and runs through August 6, features 35 of the artist’s bronze sculptures in addition to a selection of his original letters and an explanation of the 10-step “lost-wax” casting process.
 
Thursday, May 4, 2006

Belly Dancing Bounces Back

Art Danielle Horvath Belly dancing is not something you typically see in Northern Michigan. Just mention it and you’ll probably raise some eyebrows. Years of misconceptions, rumors and too many Hollywood movies with visions of women in harems running around half naked trying to please the sultan, have led many Westerners to see it as something sexually inappropriate.
 
Thursday, April 27, 2006

Storehouse of Memories

Art Sandra Serra Bradshaw Walk into the Little Traverse History Museum on the Petoskey waterfront and you’ll stroll through the region’s past. It’s a past that has special significance this year in that the Little Traverse Historical Society is entering its second century as stewards of the region’s memories.
Over the past 100 years, the Historical Society has conserved Petoskey’s past, culminating in a storehouse of memories in the museum at Bayfront Park.
In 1969, The Little Traverse History Museum was incorporated as a non- profit organization to showcase the history of Emmett County.  Its motto is, “to preserve, advance and disseminate knowledge of the history of the Little Traverse Bay area,” said Candace Fitzsimons, director of the LTHM.  Fitzsimons has been director here for the last 16 years.
 
Thursday, April 27, 2006

From Women‘s Hands

Art More than 150 female artists, authors, musicians and film makers will show and sell their work at “From Women’s Hands,” a juried exhibition that runs Friday, April 28 through Sunday, April 30 at the Hagerty Center in Traverse City. 
New this year is a contribution from the Bay Area Bead Guild of 14 intricately adorned beaded bras that will be silent auctioned.  Each art bra has a theme and a story behind its creation and is covered with at least 80% art beads.  The bras can be seen in advance at the Osiris Bead and Import Shop in downtown TC.
Film is a major focus of the artfest this year with the work of several female filmmakers available for viewing at Hagerty Center.  One  film, “Colorblind,” has appeared in 14 festivals and has won numerous awards.
This year’s event will also feature “Where I Live,” a breast cancer oratorio. The Trillium Singers will be featured and are thrilled to have secured Amy Wallace-Styles, noted Philadelphia mezzo soprano for the performance. There will be two performances, Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 12 noon.   
The art event draws hundreds of viewers and benefits the Women’s Cancer Fund Munson Healthcare Foundation. The Women’s Cancer fund will receive 20 percent of all art sales and 100 percent of the proceeds from the art raffle, silent auction and Oratorio performances.  Donations are tax deductible. The success of the 2005 show allowed FWH to gift $20,000 - making this show the top fundraising event for the Munson’s Women’s Cancer Fund. 

 Hours: Friday, April 28, 6-10 pm; Saturday, April 29, 10 am - 6 pm; Sunday, April 30, 11 am - 4 pm.  The Hagerty Center is located at Northwestern Michigan College’s Maritime Academy on East Bay in Traverse City, just east of the Holiday Inn.
 
Thursday, March 23, 2006

Art has no limit at Elements

Art Kristi Kates Plenty of specialty shops have come and gone in Harbor Springs.  The tiny but upscale downtown area is known for being quite particular about what businesses grace their Main Street, so it has to be something special in order for it to make an impression.  Nancy Suzor’s Elements store, one of the newer businesses in Harbor Springs, is succeeding beautifully so far, both because of the store’s eclectic yet elegant mix of items, and because of Suzor’s care in the building up of her business.
Elements - as a business - has actually been in existence since 1999.  Nancy and her daughter-in-law Janine Suzor had always talked about having an artistic retail store - Janine being interested in art and interior design, and Nancy having previously worked with a talented potter from Phoenix, Arizona.  Both of the ladies’ interests led them to various art shows, and ultimately to the idea that would one day become Elements.
 
Thursday, March 16, 2006

Get a little Art & Soul in Petoskey

Art Kristi Kates Almost exactly a year ago to date, a little shop took over the Mitchell
Street space in Petoskey where the Funky Frog used to reside.  Founded
by the enthusiastic and creatively-spirited Joelle Wilcox and dubbed
Art & Soul Studio, the new pottery-slash-crafting shop was conceived as
a place where local folks and visitors alike could make something that
was truly their own.
 
Thursday, December 22, 2005

Gallerie Medici

Art Mary Bevans Gillett In the world of tango, a “milonga” is a social gathering where one can dance the Argentine tango and other Latin dances. Gallerie Medici brings milonga to Traverse City in a dance that weaves art, music and community in a tantalizing tango.
The art gallery is unique in Northern Michigan. It showcases original works while also offering a venue for dancers to meet and novices to learn. Paying tribute to the owner’s Italian heritage, it is named for the Medici, the powerful and influential Florentine family who were leaders during the Renaissance as patrons of the arts, architecture and philosophy.
Owner Cindy Carleton opened Gallerie Medici in early October in a stunning space in the 500 block of West Front Street in Traverse City. The completely refurbished building is tucked between Mary’s Kitchen Port and the Evergreen Gallery. Step inside the storefront and the first impression is of a striking yet warmly welcoming room. A vast wood floor sweeps through the space. Deeply hued red walls and high ceilings provide a dramatic backdrop to artwork created by a palette of local, regional and international artists. The room is open, punctuated by a skylight and flower filled table in the center, and a fireplace and cozy sitting area near the back. Music wafts through the air with a subtle fluidity.
 
 
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