Letters

Letters 11-24-2014

Dangerous Votes You voted for Dr. Dan. Thanks!Rep. Benishek failed to cosponsor H.R. 601. It stops subsidies for big oil companies. He failed to cosponsor H.R. 1084. There is an exemption for hydraulic fracturing written into the Safe Drinking Water Act. H.R. 1084. It would require the contents of fracking fluids to be publicly disclosed to protect the public health.

Solar Is The Answer There have been many excellent letters about the need for our region, state and nation to take action on climate change. Now there is a viable solution to this ever-growing problem: Solar energy is the future.

Real Minimum Wage In 1966, a first class stamp cost 5 cents and minimum wage was $1.25. Today, a first class stamp is 49 cents, so federal minimum wage should be $11.25.

Doesn’t Seem Warmer I enjoy the “environmentalists” twisting themselves into pretzels trying to convince us that it is getting warmer. Sure it is... 

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Thursday, May 18, 2006

From Pain to Hope

Art Carina Hume A face with big blue eyes stares out from the canvas, marred by tears and a bright pink X where a smile should have been. The young girl, without a voice or a sense of place, is another casualty in the aftermath of a loved-one’s addiction.
The story is one of many illustrated by life-sized colorful canvases, shadow boxes and words of remembrance, to highlight the art exhibit, “From Pain to Hope.”
The exhibit opens May 13 in the lower level gallery of the Crooked Tree Arts Center in downtown Petoskey. It’s supported by a grant from the Petoskey-Harbor Springs Area Community Foundation.
 
Thursday, May 11, 2006

Festival of Tables

Art Anne Stanton Carol Murray’s body was badly broken 11 years ago in a car accident. Unable to walk or even talk above a whisper for a couple of years, she spent long days soaking up healing energy from Old Mission Peninsula’s aquamarine waters. Just when she started feeling normal – except for the chronic pain that still plagues her – she was diagnosed with cancer.
You might say Murray’s life is a metaphor of Festival of Tables, a huge event coming up on Saturday, May 13. For most of the day, 800 women pack a huge hall of the Grand Traverse Resort. They sip on champagne and wine, enjoy a gourmet lunch, chat, and bid on boutique jewelry and indulgences for all the senses. It’s a day for women to admire the creativity of volunteers who have spent literally hundreds of hours creating tables—miniature worlds of beauty, and imagination and possibility.
 
Thursday, May 11, 2006

The Quilt Maker

Art Anne Stanton After my husband used to rearrange the living room furniture just so, he’d joke: “I’m a man and a woman, too!”
In artistic terms, the same could be said of David Lint, M.D., only he is a little older and has achieved great things with… quilts. You can see his creations hanging in the spacious, historic corridor of the Minervini Group offices until May 19th.Prepare to be amazed, even if you’re not a quilt aficionado.
They were created by an amazing man. Lint, a retired orthopaedic surgeon, is a rare breed, a renaissance guy. He enjoys bird hunting with his arthritic dog, hunting for morels, and ski racing. He plays classical violin and once tried to raise ostriches (but not successfully).
 
Thursday, May 11, 2006

Rodin

Art When one thinks of sculpture, one name towers above all others: Auguste Rodin is to bronze what William Shakespeare is to theatre or Robert Johnson is to the blues.
So a new exhibit, “Rodin: In His Own Words,” offers a rare chance to see the work of the French master of the human form at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City. The exhibit, which opened April 29 and runs through August 6, features 35 of the artist’s bronze sculptures in addition to a selection of his original letters and an explanation of the 10-step “lost-wax” casting process.
 
Thursday, May 4, 2006

Belly Dancing Bounces Back

Art Danielle Horvath Belly dancing is not something you typically see in Northern Michigan. Just mention it and you’ll probably raise some eyebrows. Years of misconceptions, rumors and too many Hollywood movies with visions of women in harems running around half naked trying to please the sultan, have led many Westerners to see it as something sexually inappropriate.
 
Thursday, April 27, 2006

Storehouse of Memories

Art Sandra Serra Bradshaw Walk into the Little Traverse History Museum on the Petoskey waterfront and you’ll stroll through the region’s past. It’s a past that has special significance this year in that the Little Traverse Historical Society is entering its second century as stewards of the region’s memories.
Over the past 100 years, the Historical Society has conserved Petoskey’s past, culminating in a storehouse of memories in the museum at Bayfront Park.
In 1969, The Little Traverse History Museum was incorporated as a non- profit organization to showcase the history of Emmett County.  Its motto is, “to preserve, advance and disseminate knowledge of the history of the Little Traverse Bay area,” said Candace Fitzsimons, director of the LTHM.  Fitzsimons has been director here for the last 16 years.
 
Thursday, April 27, 2006

From Women‘s Hands

Art More than 150 female artists, authors, musicians and film makers will show and sell their work at “From Women’s Hands,” a juried exhibition that runs Friday, April 28 through Sunday, April 30 at the Hagerty Center in Traverse City. 
New this year is a contribution from the Bay Area Bead Guild of 14 intricately adorned beaded bras that will be silent auctioned.  Each art bra has a theme and a story behind its creation and is covered with at least 80% art beads.  The bras can be seen in advance at the Osiris Bead and Import Shop in downtown TC.
Film is a major focus of the artfest this year with the work of several female filmmakers available for viewing at Hagerty Center.  One  film, “Colorblind,” has appeared in 14 festivals and has won numerous awards.
This year’s event will also feature “Where I Live,” a breast cancer oratorio. The Trillium Singers will be featured and are thrilled to have secured Amy Wallace-Styles, noted Philadelphia mezzo soprano for the performance. There will be two performances, Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 12 noon.   
The art event draws hundreds of viewers and benefits the Women’s Cancer Fund Munson Healthcare Foundation. The Women’s Cancer fund will receive 20 percent of all art sales and 100 percent of the proceeds from the art raffle, silent auction and Oratorio performances.  Donations are tax deductible. The success of the 2005 show allowed FWH to gift $20,000 - making this show the top fundraising event for the Munson’s Women’s Cancer Fund. 

 Hours: Friday, April 28, 6-10 pm; Saturday, April 29, 10 am - 6 pm; Sunday, April 30, 11 am - 4 pm.  The Hagerty Center is located at Northwestern Michigan College’s Maritime Academy on East Bay in Traverse City, just east of the Holiday Inn.
 
Thursday, March 23, 2006

Art has no limit at Elements

Art Kristi Kates Plenty of specialty shops have come and gone in Harbor Springs.  The tiny but upscale downtown area is known for being quite particular about what businesses grace their Main Street, so it has to be something special in order for it to make an impression.  Nancy Suzor’s Elements store, one of the newer businesses in Harbor Springs, is succeeding beautifully so far, both because of the store’s eclectic yet elegant mix of items, and because of Suzor’s care in the building up of her business.
Elements - as a business - has actually been in existence since 1999.  Nancy and her daughter-in-law Janine Suzor had always talked about having an artistic retail store - Janine being interested in art and interior design, and Nancy having previously worked with a talented potter from Phoenix, Arizona.  Both of the ladies’ interests led them to various art shows, and ultimately to the idea that would one day become Elements.
 
Thursday, March 16, 2006

Get a little Art & Soul in Petoskey

Art Kristi Kates Almost exactly a year ago to date, a little shop took over the Mitchell
Street space in Petoskey where the Funky Frog used to reside.  Founded
by the enthusiastic and creatively-spirited Joelle Wilcox and dubbed
Art & Soul Studio, the new pottery-slash-crafting shop was conceived as
a place where local folks and visitors alike could make something that
was truly their own.
 
Thursday, December 22, 2005

Gallerie Medici

Art Mary Bevans Gillett In the world of tango, a “milonga” is a social gathering where one can dance the Argentine tango and other Latin dances. Gallerie Medici brings milonga to Traverse City in a dance that weaves art, music and community in a tantalizing tango.
The art gallery is unique in Northern Michigan. It showcases original works while also offering a venue for dancers to meet and novices to learn. Paying tribute to the owner’s Italian heritage, it is named for the Medici, the powerful and influential Florentine family who were leaders during the Renaissance as patrons of the arts, architecture and philosophy.
Owner Cindy Carleton opened Gallerie Medici in early October in a stunning space in the 500 block of West Front Street in Traverse City. The completely refurbished building is tucked between Mary’s Kitchen Port and the Evergreen Gallery. Step inside the storefront and the first impression is of a striking yet warmly welcoming room. A vast wood floor sweeps through the space. Deeply hued red walls and high ceilings provide a dramatic backdrop to artwork created by a palette of local, regional and international artists. The room is open, punctuated by a skylight and flower filled table in the center, and a fireplace and cozy sitting area near the back. Music wafts through the air with a subtle fluidity.
 
Thursday, December 1, 2005

On the Brink

Art Rick Coates Self-doubt runs through us all from time to time, especially those who create for a living. So when artist Angela Schuler was encouraged by her friends three years ago to pursue her passion to paint, she wondered how good she really was.
“My friends and their friends were telling me that I had talent,” said Schuler. “But I didn’t know if they were just being nice. I appreciated their support but I wanted some validation of my work outside of my circle of friends and family.”
Earlier this fall Schuler received that validation when a call came from Chicago’s famed Gruen Galleries (part of the internationally renowned River North Gallery District that attracts collectors and buyers from around the world) asking Schuler for four of her works to sell at their gallery.
“When I was questioning my abilities a couple of years ago I sent copies of my works to three galleries in Chicago’s River North District,” said Schuler. “Gruen said they loved my work but the pieces they wanted had already sold. So things stalled until they called again and asked me to create four works that were 4’ by 6’ to be sold at their gallery. I just dropped them off a couple of weeks ago so we will see.”
Gruen plans to hold an exhibition of Schuler’s works in the future where she will be the gallery’s featured artist.
 
Thursday, November 3, 2005

Mission Possible

Art Rick Coates Debra McKeon, the new executive director of the Traverse Area Arts Council has her hands full. Funds and grants for arts organizations have been drying up in recent years. And without a leader for over a year, little if anything has been heard of the Arts Council during that time.
“The Arts Council has essentially been resting for the past year,” said McKeon. “Its importance to the community has not lessened at all. After coming off a 10 year run where it accomplished so much for the arts in this area, this sort of down time is typical. It has been catching its breath and is now ready for its next phase.”
McKeon, who started in late September, comes in as “overqualified” for the position. For the past 20 years she has worked at the international performing arts level. That included serving as the assistant manager of the New York Philharmonic and traveling with famed conductor Leonard Bernstein. A desire to enjoy small town living led her and her husband to move to Elk Rapids where he serves as a school band director.
 
Thursday, October 27, 2005

InsideOut Gallery Digs Into Art‘s Underground

Art Rick Coates It’s called “Pop Surrealism,” or “Underground Art,” and sometimes “Lowbrow or Outsider Art.” Call it what you like but InsideOut Gallery owner Mike Curths likes to simply call it art.
“I don’t claim to be an expert on art,” said Curths, “But I do know what I like and this art that is known as ‘underground’ speaks to me.”
Curths and his wife Kim opened InsideOut seven months ago. Located in downtown Traverse City on Garland (near the fish weir and the Visitors Center) the gallery will host an artist reception and masquerade/costume gathering Saturday October 29 from 7 pm to 11 pm. Since opening, InsideOut has hosted a series of artist receptions on the last Saturday of each month.
“I have expanded the theme for this reception in keeping with the Halloween weekend spirit,” said Curths. “We are encouraging people to come in costume and to be creative. We will serve refreshments and there will be live music.”
Voluntary contributions will be accepted for a scholarship fund that Curths and others are creating to help students interested in pursuing non-traditional art forms.
 
Thursday, October 27, 2005

Carving Out A Place In Time

Art Kip Knight After breakfast and a few morning chores, Dick Lamphier finds the truck keys and points his silver Ford pickup in the direction of his woodworking studio a few blocks away in Elk Rapids. Upon entering, you see just how busy he is. Lathes, vices, clamps, saws, a drill press, mallets and custom crafted wooden boxes filled with delicate hand tools along with wood in all shapes and sizes, unintentionally decorate the interior of this cedar shake cottage-like garage. On his wall, measuring six feet tall and five feet wide and about six to eight inches thick is his current artistic pursuit. As you study the detail, it seems even bigger.
In the late winter of 2004, Lamphier accepted an offer from Harbor Beach, Michigan to design and carve a large wooden panel of the town’s lighthouse and its adjacent pier and shoreline. When completed, the approximately 250-pound rendition will be displayed in Harbor Beach Community Hospital. It will include the names of donors to the medical communities, the many programs and the hospital itself.
“It all began with a web posting on Michigan Wood Carvers Association in January 2004. I hesitated and didn’t reply right away.” Lamphier admits. “Then, a few weeks past and I sent them my portfolio. In the end, I was selected out of about four other interested carvers.”
 
Thursday, October 20, 2005

The Personal Mythology of Melonie Steffes

Art Robert Downes Melonie Steffes is one of those lucky persons who knew what she wanted to do with her life at an early age.
Call it a vision.
“I don’t really remember when I knew I wanted to become an artist; I’ve just always done it,” she says. “I think a lot of it was the encouragement I got from my family. My grandmother was an artist and I spent a lot of my young days with her and got a lot of encouragement.
“I remember in my teens I started calling myself an artist,” she adds. “I just naturally flowed into that as something I was going to do.”
That calling is starting to pay off for the 32-year-old painter from Interlochen whose work is on exhibit at Gallery Fifty at the Grand Traverse Commons in Traverse City through October.
Those who visit the gallery will likely be dazzled by Steffe’s personal vision which has a touch of the surreal or the magical realism found in the works of Chagall or Salvador Dali. Images of disembodied brains, a flying cow, or of her husband Michael Callaghan dreaming over a pair of red shoes naturally lead to speculation over what the artist is trying to say.
Even Steffes doesn’t quite know the answer, except that the symbolic images are a powerful new direction for her work.
“Right now I feel like this is the direction I should be going in -- it’s like a personal mythology,” she says. “I don’t sit around and think of what my symbols are or what they mean. People ask me what the cord is or the snake (in her painting, “The Red Cord”) and I don’t know. People come up with their own ideas. I think that’s great. It’s their own interpretation and that’s what I like about art.”
 
 
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