Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

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Thursday, July 5, 2007

Photographic fundraiser clicks for Holly Nelson

Art Katie Hudson Local photographer Holly Nelson loves to capture the light. “I always look for the right lighting, which is what photography is all about,” she says.
The 27-year-old Honor native has recently come out of a dark time in her life. Last December, she was diagnosed with a cancerous tumor on her pancreas.
It was an islet cell tumor, a rare form of cancer that affects about one in a million people, doctors told her. It usually strikes men and older people, and it doesn’t run in Nelson’s family, which made her case even more unusual.
 
Thursday, July 5, 2007

Benjamin Maier Ceramics

Art Robert Downes Peer beyond the elegant storefront windows of Benjamin Maier’s gallery in downtown Leland and you’ll find a contemporary landscape of swirling colors, captured in clay.
The gallery walls are filled with Maier’s creations, ranging from Oriental teapots to vases, cups, dishware and stoneware pots, all imbued with a dreamy sense of style and color. It’s clear at a glance that Maier, 29, has a singular vision that brings out the best of what clay has to offer, draped in a sublime range of glazes and colors.
Maier’s celebration of the earth happened by chance. After graduating from Traverse City Central High School in 1996, he attended Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, completing a degree in political science with a minor in economics.
 
Thursday, June 28, 2007

The Ripple Effect

Art The glory of the Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore is revealed with maximum impact at the new Ripple Effect Studio and Gallery in the Village of Empire.
The gallery provides a summer worksite and exhibit space for acclaimed large format photogra-pher Jeff Ripple. A resident of Naples, Florida, the photographer has exhibited in more than a dozen solo and group museum exhibits, won numerous awards nationwide, and has authored nine books of natural history.
 
Thursday, June 14, 2007

Echoes of the past:Artists North

Art Carina Hume t’s 88 degrees out and glass blower, Lynn Dinning, is standing in front of a 2,100 degree furnace. Talk about suffering for her craft...
A former member of Artists North, the once-vibrant group which got its start in the 1970s, Dinning, as well as Northern Michigan’s arts community, has learned to evolve.
Formed in 1975, Artists North was the most widely known artist group in Northern Michigan at the time, promoting artists from Antrim, Charlevoix and Emmet counties.
 
Thursday, June 14, 2007

You gotta have art

Art Carina Hume You can visit at least one arts & crafts fair every weekend all summer long in Northern Michigan, many of which feature scores of talented local artists as well as those who travel all season long from across the country. Here’s the rundown on an art fair near you:

June
15 & 16: Cheboygan’s Annual Summer Arts & Crafts Show, 6/15, 4-9 p.m., 6/16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Washington Park.
23 & 24: Summer Solstice Art Show, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., East Park, Charlevoix
24: Old Towne Arts & Crafts Fair, Union Street, TC,10 a.m.-5 p.m.
30: Art Rapids! A juried fine arts fair with live music and kids’ events in Memorial Park, Elk Rapids. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. www.artrapids.org
30: Mackinaw City Juried Arts & Crafts Show, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Conkling Heritage Waterfront Park
 
Thursday, May 3, 2007

Inner Vision: Mike Sincic

Art Tim Madison Mike Sincic’s paintings are remarkably realistic for a blind man’s. He paints...shockingly well. The paintings are idyllic: beaches, sunsets and other nature scenes. After seeing his work, it seems impossible at first that a man who gets around with a cane and the help of a friend’s elbow could have created these works of art. As I watch him -- sweeping his cane in a wide swath at the crosswalk outside the coffee shop where I am meeting him for an interview -- I can’t help but doubt. Are there many naysayers?
 
Thursday, April 26, 2007

Art Appeal: Gallery on Main

Art Carina Hume Northern Michigan plays host to a hotbed of talented artists, and Bay Harbor’s Gallery on Main is no exception. The gallery, open since Memorial Weekend 2005, boasts a tremendous variety of work – from pottery to prints to furniture to paintings – certain to please local residents and vacationers alike.
“We can hold about 25 artists,” says Larissa Flynn, gallery manager and artist herself. “About half are from the area, here year-round. The other half are kind of scattered around Michigan or spend their summers here.”
Large windows create a welcoming entry and the compact space is neatly arranged with groupings of artists’ work spread throughout the gallery.
“I try to have a wide range of things to appeal to many different tastes,” says Flynn. “We have abstracts, we’ve got bronze wildlife sculpture; we try to keep it Northern Michigan.”
 
Thursday, March 22, 2007

The Art of Africa comes to Dennos

Art The classic African masks, sculpture and jewelry at a new exhibit at the Dennos Museum Center may have the look of artifacts that could be hundreds or even thousands of years old, but their timeless quality continues to influence the creation of art in our own time and culture.
European encounters with the arts of the African peoples south of the Sahara desert profoundly influenced 20th century Western art, contributing to the styles of many noted artists, such as Picasso, who was known for using African mask forms in his paintings.
 
Thursday, January 25, 2007

Art as therapy

Art Danielle Horvath “The artist is a receptacle for emotions that come from all over the place; from the sky, from the earth, from a scrap of paper, from a passing shape, from a spider’s web.” ~Vincent Van Gogh



By Danielle Horvath

Self-expression has long been used to “unlock” emotions, resolve conflict, reduce stress, increase self-awareness and gain personal insight. In Benzie County, self-expression and the healing power of art are themes of a new show focusing on mental health.
Art as therapy is used to help children deal with grief; it is used in hospitals to aid patients in the healing process; in prisons to help inmates see another side of themselves; as a treatment in halfway houses and homeless shelters.
 
Thursday, January 18, 2007

Ice, Spice & more at Bay Harbor

Art Kristi Kates Ice sculptures are one of those art forms that are sometimes taken for granted, perhaps because they can just as easily show up on a cruise-ship buffet table or a wedding reception as at an art-specific event. But they are just as worthy of acclaim as art done in other mediums, and perhaps more difficult logistically than most of the others. 
Even for the creatively-inclined,  the av-erage person can’t just pick up a chunk of ice and start sculpting in order to get the kind of clear, sharply defined, beautiful results that are most desired. There are a wide variety of variables that go into ice sculpting, from temperature to the kind of ice used.
 
Thursday, January 11, 2007

He‘s a Magic Man

Art Carina Hume There’s been a lot of magic in Harry Colestock’s life: He helped put John Glenn Jr. into space, enabled surgeons to efficiently melt a knot at the end of a suture, and puts smiles on the faces of many with his magic act.
A resident of Walloon Lake, Harry’s magical beginnings go back to his childhood. Born in 1923, Colestock was a child of the Great Depression who quickly learned the value of work. When his father lost his job, the family sold their house, purchased a five-acre piece of property just west of Birmingham, and lived in a tent.
 
Thursday, December 28, 2006

C2 Gallery

Art Kristi Kates The C2 Gallery story actually starts with the Koucky Gallery, a gallery that was popular in Charlevoix from the late ‘80s up until 2005. 
Cheryl Carey had been working for the Kouckys since 2003 when they called her from their Florida location and told her to pack everything up and put it on sale as they had decided to close the gallery;  the Kouckys - Chuck and Nancy - had grown tired of the trek between their Charlevoix gallery and their Florida gallery every year, and they wanted to concentrate on their Florida location.  Cheryl Carey, along with her husband, Mike, whose family are good friends of the Kouckys - then saw an opportunity they couldn’t refuse.  “Yes,” Mike Carey confirms, “it just seemed like a great opportunity for us to do something we love.”
 
Thursday, December 14, 2006

Bug Art

Art One of the most bizarre things you’re likely to see this year (or any year) is the new installation of bug art at the Dennos Museum Center: “A Terrible Beauty: Compulsion and Repulsion,” which runs December 10-March 4.
The installation by artist Jennifer Angus features 5,500 exotic insects collected from around the world and arranged in compelling patterns.
 
Thursday, November 16, 2006

Art Guides, Docent Program

Art Carina Hume Twenty excited third-graders gather near the stairs in the Crooked Tree Arts Center’s lower level.
“Do you know what you’re going to see today?” asks Susan Sheets, a six-year veteran of the art center’s docent program and current co-chair.
Five hands shoot into the air. “Paintings,” says one student.
“Drawings,” says another.
 
Thursday, October 5, 2006

Fall for Art in Leelanau

Art Rick Coates  The Leelanau Peninsula is loaded with artistic talent and numerous galleries. Michigan’s little finger plans to showcase in two art events this weekend. Galleries and shops in Suttons Bay will host the first annual Suttons Bay Art Stroll on Friday, October 6. Several galleries throughout the Peninsula will participate in the second annual Fall for Art Friday through Sunday.
The Suttons Bay Art Stroll was born out of a reception planned by Michigan Artists Gallery owner Sue Ann Round.
 
 
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