Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Thursday, April 27, 2006

Storehouse of Memories

Art Sandra Serra Bradshaw Walk into the Little Traverse History Museum on the Petoskey waterfront and you’ll stroll through the region’s past. It’s a past that has special significance this year in that the Little Traverse Historical Society is entering its second century as stewards of the region’s memories.
Over the past 100 years, the Historical Society has conserved Petoskey’s past, culminating in a storehouse of memories in the museum at Bayfront Park.
In 1969, The Little Traverse History Museum was incorporated as a non- profit organization to showcase the history of Emmett County.  Its motto is, “to preserve, advance and disseminate knowledge of the history of the Little Traverse Bay area,” said Candace Fitzsimons, director of the LTHM.  Fitzsimons has been director here for the last 16 years.
 
Thursday, April 27, 2006

From Women‘s Hands

Art More than 150 female artists, authors, musicians and film makers will show and sell their work at “From Women’s Hands,” a juried exhibition that runs Friday, April 28 through Sunday, April 30 at the Hagerty Center in Traverse City. 
New this year is a contribution from the Bay Area Bead Guild of 14 intricately adorned beaded bras that will be silent auctioned.  Each art bra has a theme and a story behind its creation and is covered with at least 80% art beads.  The bras can be seen in advance at the Osiris Bead and Import Shop in downtown TC.
Film is a major focus of the artfest this year with the work of several female filmmakers available for viewing at Hagerty Center.  One  film, “Colorblind,” has appeared in 14 festivals and has won numerous awards.
This year’s event will also feature “Where I Live,” a breast cancer oratorio. The Trillium Singers will be featured and are thrilled to have secured Amy Wallace-Styles, noted Philadelphia mezzo soprano for the performance. There will be two performances, Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 12 noon.   
The art event draws hundreds of viewers and benefits the Women’s Cancer Fund Munson Healthcare Foundation. The Women’s Cancer fund will receive 20 percent of all art sales and 100 percent of the proceeds from the art raffle, silent auction and Oratorio performances.  Donations are tax deductible. The success of the 2005 show allowed FWH to gift $20,000 - making this show the top fundraising event for the Munson’s Women’s Cancer Fund. 

 Hours: Friday, April 28, 6-10 pm; Saturday, April 29, 10 am - 6 pm; Sunday, April 30, 11 am - 4 pm.  The Hagerty Center is located at Northwestern Michigan College’s Maritime Academy on East Bay in Traverse City, just east of the Holiday Inn.
 
Thursday, March 23, 2006

Art has no limit at Elements

Art Kristi Kates Plenty of specialty shops have come and gone in Harbor Springs.  The tiny but upscale downtown area is known for being quite particular about what businesses grace their Main Street, so it has to be something special in order for it to make an impression.  Nancy Suzor’s Elements store, one of the newer businesses in Harbor Springs, is succeeding beautifully so far, both because of the store’s eclectic yet elegant mix of items, and because of Suzor’s care in the building up of her business.
Elements - as a business - has actually been in existence since 1999.  Nancy and her daughter-in-law Janine Suzor had always talked about having an artistic retail store - Janine being interested in art and interior design, and Nancy having previously worked with a talented potter from Phoenix, Arizona.  Both of the ladies’ interests led them to various art shows, and ultimately to the idea that would one day become Elements.
 
Thursday, March 16, 2006

Get a little Art & Soul in Petoskey

Art Kristi Kates Almost exactly a year ago to date, a little shop took over the Mitchell
Street space in Petoskey where the Funky Frog used to reside.  Founded
by the enthusiastic and creatively-spirited Joelle Wilcox and dubbed
Art & Soul Studio, the new pottery-slash-crafting shop was conceived as
a place where local folks and visitors alike could make something that
was truly their own.
 
Thursday, December 22, 2005

Gallerie Medici

Art Mary Bevans Gillett In the world of tango, a “milonga” is a social gathering where one can dance the Argentine tango and other Latin dances. Gallerie Medici brings milonga to Traverse City in a dance that weaves art, music and community in a tantalizing tango.
The art gallery is unique in Northern Michigan. It showcases original works while also offering a venue for dancers to meet and novices to learn. Paying tribute to the owner’s Italian heritage, it is named for the Medici, the powerful and influential Florentine family who were leaders during the Renaissance as patrons of the arts, architecture and philosophy.
Owner Cindy Carleton opened Gallerie Medici in early October in a stunning space in the 500 block of West Front Street in Traverse City. The completely refurbished building is tucked between Mary’s Kitchen Port and the Evergreen Gallery. Step inside the storefront and the first impression is of a striking yet warmly welcoming room. A vast wood floor sweeps through the space. Deeply hued red walls and high ceilings provide a dramatic backdrop to artwork created by a palette of local, regional and international artists. The room is open, punctuated by a skylight and flower filled table in the center, and a fireplace and cozy sitting area near the back. Music wafts through the air with a subtle fluidity.
 
Thursday, December 1, 2005

On the Brink

Art Rick Coates Self-doubt runs through us all from time to time, especially those who create for a living. So when artist Angela Schuler was encouraged by her friends three years ago to pursue her passion to paint, she wondered how good she really was.
“My friends and their friends were telling me that I had talent,” said Schuler. “But I didn’t know if they were just being nice. I appreciated their support but I wanted some validation of my work outside of my circle of friends and family.”
Earlier this fall Schuler received that validation when a call came from Chicago’s famed Gruen Galleries (part of the internationally renowned River North Gallery District that attracts collectors and buyers from around the world) asking Schuler for four of her works to sell at their gallery.
“When I was questioning my abilities a couple of years ago I sent copies of my works to three galleries in Chicago’s River North District,” said Schuler. “Gruen said they loved my work but the pieces they wanted had already sold. So things stalled until they called again and asked me to create four works that were 4’ by 6’ to be sold at their gallery. I just dropped them off a couple of weeks ago so we will see.”
Gruen plans to hold an exhibition of Schuler’s works in the future where she will be the gallery’s featured artist.
 
Thursday, November 3, 2005

Mission Possible

Art Rick Coates Debra McKeon, the new executive director of the Traverse Area Arts Council has her hands full. Funds and grants for arts organizations have been drying up in recent years. And without a leader for over a year, little if anything has been heard of the Arts Council during that time.
“The Arts Council has essentially been resting for the past year,” said McKeon. “Its importance to the community has not lessened at all. After coming off a 10 year run where it accomplished so much for the arts in this area, this sort of down time is typical. It has been catching its breath and is now ready for its next phase.”
McKeon, who started in late September, comes in as “overqualified” for the position. For the past 20 years she has worked at the international performing arts level. That included serving as the assistant manager of the New York Philharmonic and traveling with famed conductor Leonard Bernstein. A desire to enjoy small town living led her and her husband to move to Elk Rapids where he serves as a school band director.
 
Thursday, October 27, 2005

InsideOut Gallery Digs Into Art‘s Underground

Art Rick Coates It’s called “Pop Surrealism,” or “Underground Art,” and sometimes “Lowbrow or Outsider Art.” Call it what you like but InsideOut Gallery owner Mike Curths likes to simply call it art.
“I don’t claim to be an expert on art,” said Curths, “But I do know what I like and this art that is known as ‘underground’ speaks to me.”
Curths and his wife Kim opened InsideOut seven months ago. Located in downtown Traverse City on Garland (near the fish weir and the Visitors Center) the gallery will host an artist reception and masquerade/costume gathering Saturday October 29 from 7 pm to 11 pm. Since opening, InsideOut has hosted a series of artist receptions on the last Saturday of each month.
“I have expanded the theme for this reception in keeping with the Halloween weekend spirit,” said Curths. “We are encouraging people to come in costume and to be creative. We will serve refreshments and there will be live music.”
Voluntary contributions will be accepted for a scholarship fund that Curths and others are creating to help students interested in pursuing non-traditional art forms.
 
Thursday, October 27, 2005

Carving Out A Place In Time

Art Kip Knight After breakfast and a few morning chores, Dick Lamphier finds the truck keys and points his silver Ford pickup in the direction of his woodworking studio a few blocks away in Elk Rapids. Upon entering, you see just how busy he is. Lathes, vices, clamps, saws, a drill press, mallets and custom crafted wooden boxes filled with delicate hand tools along with wood in all shapes and sizes, unintentionally decorate the interior of this cedar shake cottage-like garage. On his wall, measuring six feet tall and five feet wide and about six to eight inches thick is his current artistic pursuit. As you study the detail, it seems even bigger.
In the late winter of 2004, Lamphier accepted an offer from Harbor Beach, Michigan to design and carve a large wooden panel of the town’s lighthouse and its adjacent pier and shoreline. When completed, the approximately 250-pound rendition will be displayed in Harbor Beach Community Hospital. It will include the names of donors to the medical communities, the many programs and the hospital itself.
“It all began with a web posting on Michigan Wood Carvers Association in January 2004. I hesitated and didn’t reply right away.” Lamphier admits. “Then, a few weeks past and I sent them my portfolio. In the end, I was selected out of about four other interested carvers.”
 
Thursday, October 20, 2005

The Personal Mythology of Melonie Steffes

Art Robert Downes Melonie Steffes is one of those lucky persons who knew what she wanted to do with her life at an early age.
Call it a vision.
“I don’t really remember when I knew I wanted to become an artist; I’ve just always done it,” she says. “I think a lot of it was the encouragement I got from my family. My grandmother was an artist and I spent a lot of my young days with her and got a lot of encouragement.
“I remember in my teens I started calling myself an artist,” she adds. “I just naturally flowed into that as something I was going to do.”
That calling is starting to pay off for the 32-year-old painter from Interlochen whose work is on exhibit at Gallery Fifty at the Grand Traverse Commons in Traverse City through October.
Those who visit the gallery will likely be dazzled by Steffe’s personal vision which has a touch of the surreal or the magical realism found in the works of Chagall or Salvador Dali. Images of disembodied brains, a flying cow, or of her husband Michael Callaghan dreaming over a pair of red shoes naturally lead to speculation over what the artist is trying to say.
Even Steffes doesn’t quite know the answer, except that the symbolic images are a powerful new direction for her work.
“Right now I feel like this is the direction I should be going in -- it’s like a personal mythology,” she says. “I don’t sit around and think of what my symbols are or what they mean. People ask me what the cord is or the snake (in her painting, “The Red Cord”) and I don’t know. People come up with their own ideas. I think that’s great. It’s their own interpretation and that’s what I like about art.”
 
Thursday, September 29, 2005

Interlochen swings into Fall/Winter

Art From a nostalgic 1940s swing music revue to classic Dickens theatre, a quartet of jugglers to Guy Noir, Private Eye (the Ballet), Interlochen’s fall-winter season offers some of the same old acts featured year-after-year along with a few new faces.
• The season kicks off October 18 with “In the Mood,” a 1940s musical revue that celebrates the Swing Era, featuring the music of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, the Andrews Sisters, Frank Sinatra and more. The 15-piece String of Pearls Big Band Orchestra, supported by a cast of singers and dancers, presents the music and the arrangements of the top groups of the 1940s in a show that transports audiences back to the ball rooms, music theaters and radios of World War II America when swing music and dance buoyed the spirits of the nation.
 
Thursday, September 15, 2005

Artful Energy

Art Kristi Kates Kevin Barton’s art accomplishments began as early as 9th grade, when he won the award for Best Artist of the Year at Harbor Springs High School. “I was surprised by that,” Barton laughs, “but that actually may have been what started me out.”
High school would hold more surprises for Barton, especially in his junior year, when he transferred to Florida for a short time to get a change of pace from Northern Michigan.
“The school in Florida was a lot more serious about art,” Barton remembers, “and I was again surprised to see that I was getting graded better than a lot of people who had been there for a while. That’s when it
kind of dawned on me that art was what I wanted to do.”
 
Thursday, August 25, 2005

Totally Ignorant...Art bash aims for the unexpected

Art Robert Downes Last year’s Ignorant Art show was the hands-down art event of the year for Traverse City. Approximately 400 people attended -- all dressed in black -- raising $5,800 for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Grand Traverse through the sale of works by 13 “unknown” artists.
This year, artist Ryan Wells and his comrade organizers hope to top the success of that event with their guerrilla art show, which will be held this Saturday, Aug. 27 from 9 p.m. to midnight. Held on the floor above Trattoria Stella at Building 50 in the Grand Traverse Commons, the show is pumped with high expectations of its two previous outings.
Just be sure to wear black if you attend -- it’s a Japanese tradition of showing respect for a performance, transmogrified in the beatnik era to a hallmark of hipness in locales ranging from London to the East Village... and now even Northern Michigan.
 
Thursday, August 4, 2005

The Art of Boxing

Art What goes better than art and boxing? Find out Saturday, Aug. 13 at ArtFist, an event which blends an exhibition of paintings with fisticuffs at the Grand Traverse Resort.
ArtFist will celebrate the paintings of Dr. Ferdie Pacheco, a Miami artist who also served as Muhammad Ali’s ringside doctor in addition to his work as a fight commentator. A 4 p.m. reception and art exhibition at Governor’s Hall will be followed by a dinner at 6:30 and then boxing by members of the Trigger Gym, among others.
 
Thursday, August 4, 2005

The Contender

Art Robert Downes Whoever dreamed that poetry would get to be a competitive art form?
At events such as poetry slams, Russell Simmons’ “Def Poetry” show on HBO, and even Eminem’s rhymin’ rap flick, “8 Mile,” there’s a spirit of competition among wordsmiths these days to become the top poet on the pile.
 
 
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