Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Art

Art

 
Thursday, March 10, 2005

Radio Redux: Sound of the 40‘s Lights up The Trillium

Art It‘s World War II and Big Band music is all the rage on the airwaves. Do you have any clue as to where you are?
Possibly at the Trillium Restaurant at the Grand Traverse Resort and Spa, which is hosting “The 1940’s Radio Hour,” a dinner theater musical set in a small New York City radio station way back when.
The show is the first production of the new theatre company, Theatre North TC. Co-founded by Mike Kelly, who serves as director of the show, and by WTCM’s John Dew, who is acting in the production, this is Theatre North TC’s first production.
The show centers around a group of nine performers and their attempts to make it to the “big time” during the backdrop of World War II. Diners become part of the show as they take on the role of a 1940’s radio station audience.
 
Thursday, February 17, 2005

From Pencil to Pixel: Jordan River Art Center Exhibit Shows a Book‘s Progress

Art How does an illustrator/author put a book together? The answer is revealed in “From Pencil to Pixel,” a new exhibit at the Jordan River Art Center in East Jordan.
The exhibit presents original illustrations and their accompanying books from several Michigan authors and illustrators. Animation techniques, the development of illustrations for a story, and the technique of multiple drawings and story boards are also detailed.
 
Thursday, January 27, 2005

New Location for Art & Soul Gallery

Art Susan Spear In an adventurous step forward, Art & Soul Gallery has reinvented itself in the Front Street Commons, among nearby bustling businesses, an array of restaurants and popular gift shops.
Owners Amy and Steve Stinson have purposely taken on the “A” location in Traverse City’s shopping corridor (also known as the Arcade) to become a “destination” on downtown Front Street.
“We offer one-of-a-kind art and handmade objects for office, home and body,” Amy says. “It’s no secret that I love jewelry and baubles, but our overall art collection lets you experience the sensibility of this area and beyond. We are very excited about being a part of downtown.”
Honoring the lofting gallery movement of the 1970s, the Stinsons have created an urban atmosphere where paintings, pastels, illustrations, sculpture, glass, fiber and pottery are the center of attention. With a great deal of old fashion hard work, friends and family uncovered the ceiling ductwork and the post-and-beam structure.
The Stinsons brightened the brick interior with fresh paint, carpet and new lighting - reflecting their upbeat personalities. Amy frowns facetiously at gallery manager Pam Dow and states, “Pickaxes aside, our mission now is to put art into everyday life, because art feeds the spirit.”
Tantalizing their patrons with metaphors of fantasy and pastel-hued landscapes, the collaborative management duo has chosen artists by mingling local “high art” with shimmering highfalutin’ glitter.
Undaunted by convention, Stinson and Dow, in an added breach of decorum, have also included more naïve art. Naive, self-taught artists and their playful works tend to challenge the more accepted “academicisms” with their simplistic approach.
 
Thursday, December 2, 2004

A Touch of Christmas Past

Art A spectacular old-fashioned Christmas as seen through the eyes of contemp-orary artisans, florists and interior designers is in store for those who visit the Wellington Inn in Traverse City this weekend.
Located at the corner of Wellington and Washington streets, the Inn is hosting the Second Annual Inn at Christmastime tour, with a portion of the proceeds going to benefit Toys for Tots. Following a tour of the lavishly decorated rooms throughout the four-story mansion, visitors will enjoy complementary refreshments in the third floor ballroom.
 
Thursday, November 4, 2004

Art, Wine, Chocolate & Cheese

Art Some 36 artists will gather at Black Star Farms Winery in Suttons Bay this weekend to kick off the holiday season with a celebration of Michigan arts and crafts.
The event is a benefit for the Congregation Ahavat Shalom of Traverse City, which is also currently involved in celebrating the 350th year of Judaism in the New World. On Saturday, Nov. 6 from 5-9 p.m., a gala reception for the artists will include Black Star wines and treats by Malka Catering. Advance tickets at $18 are available by calling the congregation at 231-929-4330.
The show and sale is open to the public on Sunday, Nov. 7 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., featuring sculpture, paintings, photography, jewelry, ceramics, weaving and basketry from Michigan artists.
 
Thursday, October 21, 2004

Paint it Black: Ignorant Art Show of Emerging Artists Benefits Boys & Girls Club

Art Rick Coates Works of art surround us throughout the day. Even if you are unaware of it, or should we say “ignorant” to its existence. It is around just take a moment and look. In fact as you’re looking for art and your eyes gaze past a stranger or even a colleague you may have spotted a painter again unaware or ignorant to the fact that the person in the cubicle next to you or the person making your cappuccino is an artist.
Ryan Wells, who works real estate by day and his art studio by night, is an emerging artist whose co-workers were unaware of his talents. His work doesn’t appear in local galleries, not because it isn’t good enough, but because Wells is part of the “Ignorant Art” assemblage who were not formally trained and whose work doesn’t fit what is considered to be in the mainstream.
 
Thursday, October 14, 2004

Surrealist FOLK: The Kelli Snively Show goes far beyond the Ordinary at Crooked Tree

Art Local favorite and nationally-acclaimed artist Kelli Snively calls her work “Surrealist Folk,” and even the casual visitor will probably recognize why at her one-woman show at Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey this month.
As with much of the folk art of the 19th century (indeed, back to the Middle Ages), Kelli’s medium is oil paint on wood and her subjects are rendered with the same strict two-dimensionality as such past masters of the medium as Grandma Moses.
Yet there is nothing of the follower in Kelli Snively. She imbues her work with a private, warm-hearted vision that is both whimsical and contemporary. Her paintings tweak the folk and naive art traditions of the past with a post-modern wink.
 
Thursday, August 26, 2004

Nancy Groesser‘s Glass Dreamland

Art Carol Ebright On the west side of Lake Leelanau lives an artist with a need to create. She is constantly taking ordinary items and making them extraordinary. Her hands have the ability to transform into existence what her brain envisions. Nancy Groesser is a glass artist with flair.
 
Thursday, August 5, 2004

Chair-ish Auction Offers Seat-of-the-Pants Art

Art Lee Harper “A Chair is a machine to sit in.”
-- Architect Frank Lloyd Wright, 1902

“To Know a chair is really it, you sometimes have to sit,” said poet Theodore Roethke in his 1966 poem, “The Chair.”
 
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Death by the River: Macbeth Weaves its Spell on the Boardman

Art Carol South Merging Shakespeare and summertime is a full-fledged tradition in Traverse City.
While sunlight sparkles through the trees at Hannah Park and shadows creep eastward through the evening, a troupe of veteran actors will reenact the age-old tale of Macbeth. For three weekends starting this Saturday and Sunday, July 24-25 at 6 p.m., the Riverside Shakespeare Company presents this classic story of power, betrayal, murder and redemption.
 
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Stephen Duren‘s Leelanau Vision

Art Andy Taylor Artist Stephen Duren has been garnering a lot of attention for himself lately.
The latest exhibit from the artist has brought the eyes of everyone from Grand Rapids and back to Northern Michigan on him. His landscapes of the Leelanau countryside comprise “For the Land’s Sake,” an exhibit that can be seen through August 1 at the Leelanau Historical Museum.
 
Thursday, July 15, 2004

The World is Plastic: Ultra-Realistic Sculpture at Dennos Museum

Art Andy Taylor Within the annals of the National Basketball Association’s history there is an amusing story about one of its most revered players. The legendary Michael Jordan was in Milwaukee one day for a game and went to check in at the arena when he was snubbed by one of its employees: a security guard who goes by the name of ‘Art.’
 
Thursday, July 1, 2004

A New Look for Les Sirenes Galerie D‘art

Art Holly Nelson Over the past couple of years Les Sirenes Galerie D’art in Frankfort has gone through some major changes, but nothing as drastic as this year. Last year we painted all the walls with livelyO colors, getting away from plain old white, and then we installed track lighting throughout the gallery. But that wasn’t quite enough.
 
Thursday, January 15, 2004

The Lost World

Art Robert Downes Photographers were my heroes during my college days in the mid-‘70s, minoring in photojournalism. By then, many of photojournalists believed that photography had eclipsed the arid, minimalism of the painting arts, bringing a power to fathom the depths of the human soul and perhaps even change the world.
 
Thursday, January 8, 2004

Tales of The City - Derf unveils his vision of America in *The City Collected*

Art Robert Downes Long before there were reality TV shows there was the grueling urban humor of Derf, a Cleveland-based cartoonist who slams a weekly slice of irony and grit down on the comics page with his strip, “The City.“
 
 
Close
Close
Close