Letters

Letters 11-17-2014

by Dr. Buono in the November 10 Northern Express. While I applaud your enthusiasm embracing a market solution for global climate change and believe that this is a vital piece of the overall approach, it is almost laughable and at least naive to believe that your Representative Mr.

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Thursday, May 5, 2005

Art with a Mission From Women‘s Hands features 100 = artists this weekend

Art If you’re looking for the perfect Mother’s Day weekend event, consider
“From Women’s Hands,” a celebration of life, art and the power of women
working together. MoreII than 100 female visual artists, authors,
culinary professionals, musicians and film makers will show and sell
their works at the juried exhibition that kicks off Friday, May 6 from
6-10 p.m. at the Hagerty Center in Traverse City.
Last year, a crowd of over 900 turned out for the opening of the third
annual event, and organizers are hoping for a similar outpouring this
time around. Last year’s event translated into $50,000 worth of art
sales during the show, generating a gift of nearly $15,000 to the
Women’s Cancer Fund at Munson Medical Center.
 
Thursday, April 28, 2005

An Artfull Walk TC galleries bring out their best for April 29 walking tour

Art Susan Spear Just in time for the onset of the 2005 summer season, the first annual Downtown Art Walk is ready for its debut on Friday, April 29 from 5-9 p.m. A total of 21 participating stores will welcome visitors to peruse their art exhibitions and enjoy hors d’oeurves and local wines before continuing to amble through the city’s exhibits clustered along Front Street.
After enjoying each presentation, patrons will receive a stamp and an opportunity to win a $500 Downtown Shopping Spree. Walking maps will be available at each participating gallery and the Downtown Traverse City Association (DTCA) office.
Colleen Paveglio, marketing director for the DTCA and a committee of members of several downtown galleries, initiated the idea for an art walk based on the number of galleries moving downtown and the number of people passionate about local art.
A standout for her presentation this first year is Marcia Bellinger, owner of the riverside Belstone Gallery. A popular mainstay on Front Street, carrying both local and national artists, Marcia has cleared her gallery and is hosting a special reception timed to correlate with the opening of the Art Walk.
 
Thursday, March 10, 2005

Go Fish: New Studio Recycles a Warehouse for Live/Work Concept

Art Amy Yee Fish Studios, the newest concept for live/work spaces in Traverse City, is making a bit of a splash. Nestled between two railroad tracks just south of Old Town on Boardman Lake, this remodeled loft-style warehouse is now home to four creative businesses -- Priceless Photography, Sound/Design, Glenn Wolff Studio, and my own Amy Yee Design.
Located at 230 E. 14th Street, the studios were developed for artists and creative people. Using alternative materials such as corrugated metal, raw concrete flooring, rough stone countertops, translucent bathroom ceilings, and storefront window walls, the refurbished look fits in with the historic logger-railroad area. Spinning off the Soho art district in New York City, the new inhabitants have dubbed Fish Studios “the little Coho district.”
Breaking new ground with the vision of a live/work studio, architect Ken Richmond was ecstatic to find support from the city planning board which favored the idea of mixed-use cohabitation.
Zoned by the city especially for this type of use, the benefits of reusing an existing building along with environmental-friendly planning made good sense to city officials. The parking lot, made of green pervious material, allows storm water to filter back to the soil instead of stagnating. The studio use also curtails traffic and gasoline consumption, and helps build a collaborative community. Given the historic appeal of the renovated building and its central location, the tenants are excited to be part of the project.
To celebrate the building’s completion and opening to the public, Fish Studios will host an Open House on Saturday, March 12 from 4-8 p.m. for a bite of hors d’ouvres, a splash of drinks, and a four-studio tour.
 
Thursday, March 10, 2005

Radio Redux: Sound of the 40‘s Lights up The Trillium

Art It‘s World War II and Big Band music is all the rage on the airwaves. Do you have any clue as to where you are?
Possibly at the Trillium Restaurant at the Grand Traverse Resort and Spa, which is hosting “The 1940’s Radio Hour,” a dinner theater musical set in a small New York City radio station way back when.
The show is the first production of the new theatre company, Theatre North TC. Co-founded by Mike Kelly, who serves as director of the show, and by WTCM’s John Dew, who is acting in the production, this is Theatre North TC’s first production.
The show centers around a group of nine performers and their attempts to make it to the “big time” during the backdrop of World War II. Diners become part of the show as they take on the role of a 1940’s radio station audience.
 
Thursday, February 17, 2005

From Pencil to Pixel: Jordan River Art Center Exhibit Shows a Book‘s Progress

Art How does an illustrator/author put a book together? The answer is revealed in “From Pencil to Pixel,” a new exhibit at the Jordan River Art Center in East Jordan.
The exhibit presents original illustrations and their accompanying books from several Michigan authors and illustrators. Animation techniques, the development of illustrations for a story, and the technique of multiple drawings and story boards are also detailed.
 
Thursday, January 27, 2005

New Location for Art & Soul Gallery

Art Susan Spear In an adventurous step forward, Art & Soul Gallery has reinvented itself in the Front Street Commons, among nearby bustling businesses, an array of restaurants and popular gift shops.
Owners Amy and Steve Stinson have purposely taken on the “A” location in Traverse City’s shopping corridor (also known as the Arcade) to become a “destination” on downtown Front Street.
“We offer one-of-a-kind art and handmade objects for office, home and body,” Amy says. “It’s no secret that I love jewelry and baubles, but our overall art collection lets you experience the sensibility of this area and beyond. We are very excited about being a part of downtown.”
Honoring the lofting gallery movement of the 1970s, the Stinsons have created an urban atmosphere where paintings, pastels, illustrations, sculpture, glass, fiber and pottery are the center of attention. With a great deal of old fashion hard work, friends and family uncovered the ceiling ductwork and the post-and-beam structure.
The Stinsons brightened the brick interior with fresh paint, carpet and new lighting - reflecting their upbeat personalities. Amy frowns facetiously at gallery manager Pam Dow and states, “Pickaxes aside, our mission now is to put art into everyday life, because art feeds the spirit.”
Tantalizing their patrons with metaphors of fantasy and pastel-hued landscapes, the collaborative management duo has chosen artists by mingling local “high art” with shimmering highfalutin’ glitter.
Undaunted by convention, Stinson and Dow, in an added breach of decorum, have also included more naïve art. Naive, self-taught artists and their playful works tend to challenge the more accepted “academicisms” with their simplistic approach.
 
Thursday, December 2, 2004

A Touch of Christmas Past

Art A spectacular old-fashioned Christmas as seen through the eyes of contemp-orary artisans, florists and interior designers is in store for those who visit the Wellington Inn in Traverse City this weekend.
Located at the corner of Wellington and Washington streets, the Inn is hosting the Second Annual Inn at Christmastime tour, with a portion of the proceeds going to benefit Toys for Tots. Following a tour of the lavishly decorated rooms throughout the four-story mansion, visitors will enjoy complementary refreshments in the third floor ballroom.
 
Thursday, November 4, 2004

Art, Wine, Chocolate & Cheese

Art Some 36 artists will gather at Black Star Farms Winery in Suttons Bay this weekend to kick off the holiday season with a celebration of Michigan arts and crafts.
The event is a benefit for the Congregation Ahavat Shalom of Traverse City, which is also currently involved in celebrating the 350th year of Judaism in the New World. On Saturday, Nov. 6 from 5-9 p.m., a gala reception for the artists will include Black Star wines and treats by Malka Catering. Advance tickets at $18 are available by calling the congregation at 231-929-4330.
The show and sale is open to the public on Sunday, Nov. 7 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., featuring sculpture, paintings, photography, jewelry, ceramics, weaving and basketry from Michigan artists.
 
Thursday, October 21, 2004

Paint it Black: Ignorant Art Show of Emerging Artists Benefits Boys & Girls Club

Art Rick Coates Works of art surround us throughout the day. Even if you are unaware of it, or should we say “ignorant” to its existence. It is around just take a moment and look. In fact as you’re looking for art and your eyes gaze past a stranger or even a colleague you may have spotted a painter again unaware or ignorant to the fact that the person in the cubicle next to you or the person making your cappuccino is an artist.
Ryan Wells, who works real estate by day and his art studio by night, is an emerging artist whose co-workers were unaware of his talents. His work doesn’t appear in local galleries, not because it isn’t good enough, but because Wells is part of the “Ignorant Art” assemblage who were not formally trained and whose work doesn’t fit what is considered to be in the mainstream.
 
Thursday, October 14, 2004

Surrealist FOLK: The Kelli Snively Show goes far beyond the Ordinary at Crooked Tree

Art Local favorite and nationally-acclaimed artist Kelli Snively calls her work “Surrealist Folk,” and even the casual visitor will probably recognize why at her one-woman show at Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey this month.
As with much of the folk art of the 19th century (indeed, back to the Middle Ages), Kelli’s medium is oil paint on wood and her subjects are rendered with the same strict two-dimensionality as such past masters of the medium as Grandma Moses.
Yet there is nothing of the follower in Kelli Snively. She imbues her work with a private, warm-hearted vision that is both whimsical and contemporary. Her paintings tweak the folk and naive art traditions of the past with a post-modern wink.
 
Thursday, August 26, 2004

Nancy Groesser‘s Glass Dreamland

Art Carol Ebright On the west side of Lake Leelanau lives an artist with a need to create. She is constantly taking ordinary items and making them extraordinary. Her hands have the ability to transform into existence what her brain envisions. Nancy Groesser is a glass artist with flair.
 
Thursday, August 5, 2004

Chair-ish Auction Offers Seat-of-the-Pants Art

Art Lee Harper “A Chair is a machine to sit in.”
-- Architect Frank Lloyd Wright, 1902

“To Know a chair is really it, you sometimes have to sit,” said poet Theodore Roethke in his 1966 poem, “The Chair.”
 
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Death by the River: Macbeth Weaves its Spell on the Boardman

Art Carol South Merging Shakespeare and summertime is a full-fledged tradition in Traverse City.
While sunlight sparkles through the trees at Hannah Park and shadows creep eastward through the evening, a troupe of veteran actors will reenact the age-old tale of Macbeth. For three weekends starting this Saturday and Sunday, July 24-25 at 6 p.m., the Riverside Shakespeare Company presents this classic story of power, betrayal, murder and redemption.
 
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Stephen Duren‘s Leelanau Vision

Art Andy Taylor Artist Stephen Duren has been garnering a lot of attention for himself lately.
The latest exhibit from the artist has brought the eyes of everyone from Grand Rapids and back to Northern Michigan on him. His landscapes of the Leelanau countryside comprise “For the Land’s Sake,” an exhibit that can be seen through August 1 at the Leelanau Historical Museum.
 
Thursday, July 15, 2004

The World is Plastic: Ultra-Realistic Sculpture at Dennos Museum

Art Andy Taylor Within the annals of the National Basketball Association’s history there is an amusing story about one of its most revered players. The legendary Michael Jordan was in Milwaukee one day for a game and went to check in at the arena when he was snubbed by one of its employees: a security guard who goes by the name of ‘Art.’
 
 
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