Letters

Letters 07-28-14

Worry About Legals

I can’t figure out what perplexes me more, the misinformation everywhere in the media or those who believe it to be true. Take the Hobby Lobby case; as a company that is primarily owned by a religious family, they felt their First Amendment rights were infringed upon by the “Affordable” Care Act...

Stop Labeling and Enjoy

I have been struggling to find a simple way of understanding for myself the concepts of conservative, liberal, and moderation as it relates to our social interactions with each other...

Proposal One & The Public Good

Are you kidding me? Another corporate giveaway with loopholes for large corporations who rule us? Hasn’t our corrupt and worthless governor done enough to raise taxes, provide corporate welfare, unjustly tax pensions, and shut down elected officials with his emergency manager racket...

The Truth About Road Workers

Apparently Mr. Kachadurian did not catch on to the fact that the MDOT Employee Memorial in Clare is a tribute to highway workers who lost their lives building our transportation systems. It was paid for by current and former MDOT employees who likely knew some of these people personally...

Idiotic and Misguided

As a seasonal resident, I always look forward to reading your paper, if only because of the idiotic letters to the editor and off the wall columns...


Home · Articles · News · Art

Art

 
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Death by the River: Macbeth Weaves its Spell on the Boardman

Art Carol South Merging Shakespeare and summertime is a full-fledged tradition in Traverse City.
While sunlight sparkles through the trees at Hannah Park and shadows creep eastward through the evening, a troupe of veteran actors will reenact the age-old tale of Macbeth. For three weekends starting this Saturday and Sunday, July 24-25 at 6 p.m., the Riverside Shakespeare Company presents this classic story of power, betrayal, murder and redemption.
 
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Stephen Duren‘s Leelanau Vision

Art Andy Taylor Artist Stephen Duren has been garnering a lot of attention for himself lately.
The latest exhibit from the artist has brought the eyes of everyone from Grand Rapids and back to Northern Michigan on him. His landscapes of the Leelanau countryside comprise “For the Land’s Sake,” an exhibit that can be seen through August 1 at the Leelanau Historical Museum.
 
Thursday, July 15, 2004

The World is Plastic: Ultra-Realistic Sculpture at Dennos Museum

Art Andy Taylor Within the annals of the National Basketball Association’s history there is an amusing story about one of its most revered players. The legendary Michael Jordan was in Milwaukee one day for a game and went to check in at the arena when he was snubbed by one of its employees: a security guard who goes by the name of ‘Art.’
 
Thursday, July 1, 2004

A New Look for Les Sirenes Galerie D‘art

Art Holly Nelson Over the past couple of years Les Sirenes Galerie D’art in Frankfort has gone through some major changes, but nothing as drastic as this year. Last year we painted all the walls with livelyO colors, getting away from plain old white, and then we installed track lighting throughout the gallery. But that wasn’t quite enough.
 
Thursday, January 15, 2004

The Lost World

Art Robert Downes Photographers were my heroes during my college days in the mid-‘70s, minoring in photojournalism. By then, many of photojournalists believed that photography had eclipsed the arid, minimalism of the painting arts, bringing a power to fathom the depths of the human soul and perhaps even change the world.
 
Thursday, January 8, 2004

Tales of The City - Derf unveils his vision of America in *The City Collected*

Art Robert Downes Long before there were reality TV shows there was the grueling urban humor of Derf, a Cleveland-based cartoonist who slams a weekly slice of irony and grit down on the comics page with his strip, “The City.“
 
Thursday, December 11, 2003

The Art of the Blues: Nationally Renowned Photographer David Fox will Showcase his Best Shots at New Blues Restaurant

Art Rick Coates For most of his life photographer David Fox has lived with “the blues“ -- not with feelings of despair or depression but rather “THE“ blues -- the
American musical expression that has anchored rock-and-roll music for the
past 50 years. Fox has been a record producer, musician, photographer and a
driving force in the development of the Mississippi Valley Blues Festival,
one of the top blues festivals in America.
 
Thursday, October 9, 2003

Eye in the Sky: Hubble Space Telescope Exhibit Provides a Glimpse of the Universe

Art Robert Downes Not since Galileo turned his telescope towards the heavens in 1610 has any event so changed our understanding of the universe as the deployment of the Hubble Space Telescope.
 
Thursday, September 11, 2003

The Wright Stuff -- Part II: A Photographer‘s Rock Odyssey

Art Rick Coates The intensity of the Grande Ballroom show in 1968 was the turning point for
The Who. The group returned to New York to prepare for their trip back to
England, a trip that Tom Wright was unable to take because of his earlier legal
troubles.
 
Thursday, April 3, 2003

Justin Toomey Offers Unschooled Art with a Sense of Heart

Art Robert Downes Northern Michigan‘s art scene often seems more intent on pleasing tourists than on making great statements or seeking new visions: paintings of old barns, sunsets, flowers and pastoral fields are as common as dandelions in local galleries.
 
Thursday, December 12, 2002

Glenn Wolff‘s Midwest Twilight: Local Phenom brings out his Fine Art Side at Dennos Show

Art Robert Downes If there‘s any doubt that artist Glenn Wolff rates as one of the most creative forces in Northern Michigan, it will surely be laid to rest by his new exhibit, “Midwest Twilight,“ opening at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City this weekend.
Wolff, a nationally-renowned illustrator of some 20 books, and for publications such as the New York Times, Sports Illustrated and Audubon magazine, has singlehandedly defined the rustic, woodland ethos of Northern Michigan in the nation‘s consciousness over the past 15 years. His pen-and-ink drawings and watercolors capture the region‘s streams, lakes, forests and wildlife in the same spirit as Hemingway‘s early novels. If ever there was an artist who could claim the honor of laying the keystone for a Northern Michigan school of art along the same lines as the art celebrating the pueblos, desert scenes and wildlife of the American Southwest, then it is surely Glenn Wolff.
 
Thursday, March 7, 2002

Gwen Frostic Left her Mark on Northern Michigan

Art Gwen Frostic passed from the earth one day shy of her 95th birthday last April 25, leaving a legacy of nature prints and verse which earned her the posthumous award of “Best Artist“ from readers of the Northern Express.
Born Sara Gwendolen Frostic on April 26, 1906 in Sandusky, Michigan, she was afflicted with a childhood illness which left her with a condition similar to cerebral palsy. She never considered herself handicapped, however; possibly because of a fierce streak of independence. That independence was nurtured in part by her embrace of Ayn Rand‘s philosophy of objectivism which exalts the individual spirit.
Frostic developed an early interest in art, growing up in the Thumb and the City of Wyandotte. She studied art education at Eastern Michigan University as well as Western Michigan University. Her work as a tool and die maker at the Willow Run bomber plant during World War II gave her experience with assembly line skills which were of use when she launched her Presscraft Papers company in Wyandotte in the late ‘40s.
A love of nature led her to Northern Michigan, where she established her studio and workshop in Benzonia during the early ‘50s. In 1964, she moved her printmaking operation to its hobbit-like home next to the Betsie River on River Road, where visitors still select from thousands of prints.
 
 
Close
Close
Close