Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

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Sunday, October 19, 2014

Twisted Vines and Hanging Vessels

Art Ross Boissoneau A spin-off from last year’s Manistee Arts Institute’s multi-media exhibition, Twisted Vines and Hanging Vessels runs Oct. 24 through Nov. 2. The 2013 exhibit included glass, pottery, fiber arts and photography.
 
Monday, October 6, 2014

Galleries Host Tour During Color Season

Art Ross Boissoneau On Sunday, a closing reception is held at 3pm at Lake Street Studios in Glen Arbor. At that reception, those who have visited each of the participating shops are eligible for a drawing. Each gallery donates a piece of art, with as many winners as there are participating galleries.
 
Monday, September 29, 2014

Waterways

Artist’s Creative Journey Continues with Exploration of Aquatic Landscapes

Art Al Parker Using maps as her templates, Brown weaves, sews and paints cotton and other fabrics to display aerial views of the Betsie, Manistee and Boardman rivers as they meander over the northern Michigan landscape. She has also captured the shapes of Big and Little Glen lakes.
 
Monday, September 22, 2014

No Judging These Books’ Covers

Art Al Parker To Pam Yee, books are more than what’s printed in them. The Benzie County artist uses old books as an art medium to collage, glue, paint, burn and fold.
 
Monday, September 1, 2014

Art That’s Worth the Wait

Art Al Parker What has also been a profound inspiration is painting with others. My husband and I spend time in San Miguel, Mexico every year where opportunities abound in our community to gather in an artist’s studio, with five or six other artists to paint and provide support, input, and inspiration.
 
Monday, August 25, 2014

Driftwood Art Fools Mother Nature

Art Al Parker Using white cedar, poplar or choke cherry, Rollings carves, sands and paints three to five pieces at a time. He has a huge pile of driftwood drying outside his shop. Common subjects are blue herons, salmon, geese, sandhill cranes, ducks and other waterfowl.
 
Monday, August 18, 2014

Winging It

Six years ago, a trained potter dropped everything and flocked to a different sort of artistic expression.

Art Al Parker

Now, Leelanau County artist Van Wilson has truly gone to the birds. Over the past six or seven years, Wilson has created dozens of multi-media pieces featuring crows, magpies, and ravens. Many are whimsical, but all reflect his wit, wisdom and love of the American Southwest.

 
Monday, July 28, 2014

Painting With Yarn

Art Al Parker

An encounter with a yarn rug in Leland hooked artist Michelle Mueller on an entirely new – and old – kind of needlecraft. Now, the punch needle rug-hooking enthusiast has her own studio and is teaching others how to make their own.

 
Monday, July 21, 2014

Catching Light With Pastels

Art Al Parker I began in oil, watercolor, pastel, charcoal, and found I couldn’t stop. I had to try everything. I was fortunate to be able to study under some of the most wonderfully talented and supportive fine art instructors, several from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit.
 
Monday, July 7, 2014

Drawn to Nature

Art Al Parker As a child, landscape painter Sue Bowerman marinated in myriad art forms. “My mother and grandmother were both artists so I grew up around woodcarvings, portraits and landscape paintings,” said the Traverse City painter, who grew up in Buffalo, N.Y.
 
Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Tiny Town - An Artists’ Mecca

Tucked in tiny Cross Village is a gem of an arts studio where color and imagination reign supreme.

Art Ross & Cathy Boissoneau Fabric arts workshops include open studio woodblock sessions, which are held every Wednesday in July and August. These offer insights and instruction on how to use a wide variety of woodblocks and textile paints on cotton. On Mondays and Tuesdays, the studio offers instruction for Shibori-Indigo and Batik-Indigo during dropin studio time.
 
Monday, June 23, 2014

“The Land of Delight”

Art Al Parker Sorensen’s newest specialty is a series of eye-catching masks. Using mannequin faces as templates, they are created in her former garage-turned-studio that now houses two working looms. Her work schedule has been interrupted lately by her caring for ill friends, but she tries to keep a steady fl ow of projects underway.
 
Monday, June 16, 2014

Third Career. Limitless Perspective.

Frankfort painter Ellie Harold never intended to become an artist for her third career.

Art Al Parker She started her working life as a registered nurse, caring for patients in an intensive care unit. Later she became an ordained Unity minister, leading a church she pioneered in Atlanta. About a dozen years ago, Harold picked up a paint brush and began creating landscapes and still lifes that vibrate with color.
 
Monday, June 16, 2014

Shows, Walks & Fairs

Art Al Parker Art lovers on the prowl for a special painting, sculpture or pottery can find a high quality show almost every weekend from Memorial Day through Labor Day across northern Michigan. Here are details on some of the most popular shows and art fairs across the region.
 
Monday, June 16, 2014

Art to be ‘Used and Abused’

Art Al Parker Growing up in Petoskey, Jason Thelen dreamed of being a surfer and riding the big saltwater waves. But fate kept him near fresh water, so he adapted accordingly and began building custom standup paddleboards that “take the big lake’s little waves,” he said.
 
 
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