Letters

Letters 12-14-2014

Come Together There is a time-honored war strategy known as “divide and conquer,” and never has it been more effective than now. The enemy is using it against us through television, internet and other social media. I opened a Facebook account a couple of years back to gain more entries in local contests. Since then I had fallen under its spell; I rushed into judgment on several social issues based on information found on those pages

Quiet The Phones! This weekend we attended two beautiful Christmas musical events and the enjoyment of both were significantly diminished by self-absorbed boors holding their stupid iPhones high overhead to capture extremely crucial and highly needed photos. We too own iPhones, but during a public concert we possess the decency and manners to leave them turned off and/or at home. Today’s performance, the annual Messiah Sing at Traverse City’s Central Methodist Church, was a new low: we watched as Mr. Self-Absorbed not only took several photos but then afterwards immediately posted them to his Facebook page. We were dumbfounded.

A Torturous Defense In defense of the C.I.A.’s use of torture in a mostly fruitless search for vital information, some suggest that the dire situation facing us after 9-11, justified the use of torture even at the expense of the potential loss of much of our nation’s moral authority.

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Monday, June 14, 2010

The Art Crowd Gets Serious

Art Robert Downes The Art Crowd Gets Serious: ArtisanDesign Network offers a bold new venture in TC
By Robert Downes
Walk into the new ArtisanDesign Network Cooperative Gallery on Front Street in downtown Traverse City and it’s not hard to imagine that you’re in an upscale gallery in New York City or Chicago.
The new gallery is a bold yet thoughtful venture embarked upon by more than 40 of the region’s top artists and artisans. Committed to the exhibition of fine art, the gallery aims to elevate Northern Michigan’s art scene into the rare air of national significance.
In other words, don’t expect to find Petoskey stone knick-knacks, paintings of old barns, faux impressionist harbor scenes and other staples of the Northern Michigan art scene. The gang at the ArtisanDesign Network are gunning for glory with serious art, and are laying serious cash on the line to see that their work reaches the public.
 
Monday, May 24, 2010

ConTexTure

Art Erin Crowell ConTEXTure: Dennos offers a marriage of poetry & sculpture
By Erin Crowell
At first glance, the ConTEXTure sculptures currently on display at the Dennos Museum Center look like a mess, thrown together by a five-year-old with way too much glue and freedom. They are convoluted works of art, colorful pieces held together by strands of wire, paint and other (sometimes unidentifiable) household objects.
Chaos, you could say.
But look closer and you will understand the amount of thought and work that went into each piece; how the web of strands seem to suspend, hold and balance each work. Every sculpture is accompanied by a poem, words that hold that same intricacy and consideration.
Sculptor Bill Allen and poet Fleda Brown combined their arts to create ConTEXTure: A Conversation Between Artists in Two Forms. Now on display through June 13 at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City, the exhibit is a marriage – one medium giving voice to the other.
 
Monday, May 3, 2010

Chalice of Fire

Art Jeffray N. Kessler Chalice of fire
In his convictions and his art, John T. Unger is a man of steel
By Jeffray N. Kessler
As he discusses art on the porch of his home outside of Mancelona, a
roofline shadow cast by the high afternoon sun splits sculptor John
Unger in half. The image is emblematic of a man whose talents are
bringing him success on two fronts. He is an internationally renowned
metal sculptor as well as a custom website consultant.
 
Monday, April 26, 2010

Lewis and Clark

Art Kristi Kates Lewis and Clark make the trek to Petoskey
By Kristi Kates
During the first few years of the 1800s, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark embarked on the first serious overland expedition taken across the United States. Now, those intrepid explorers are making a trip to Petoskey with an exhibit at the public library.
With help from Sacajawea (a Shoshone woman who acted as interpreter and guide) and her husband, Toussaint Charbonneau, Lewis and Clark helped set the groundwork for the westward expansion of the U.S., and traveled through many sovereign Indian nations along the way.
They weren’t the first to explore the American West; but they were the first scientific expedition that did so in an official capacity. Their voyage of discovery and the culture of Native America will be celebrated at the Petoskey exhibit.
 
Monday, January 11, 2010

Robert Frost Stops by the Woods at Crooked Tree

Art Glen Young Robert Frost ‘Stops by the Woods’ at Crooked Tree
By Glen Young
Gail DeMeyere could not be more excited about her upcoming exhibition.
DeMeyere, curator at Petoskey’s Crooked Tree Arts Center, has
put together “Stopping by Woods on a
Snowy Evening,” a mixed media presen-tation that takes the Robert Frost
poem of the same name as its unifying theme, combining the literature with
the art work of 16 Northern Michigan artists.
 
Monday, November 30, 2009

An old ice house makes history as Stafford‘s Gallery

Art Kristi Kates An Old Ice House
Makes History as Stafford’s Gallery
By Kristi Kates
Getting creative with an historic building was a challenge at first for Stafford’s Hospitality in Petoskey.
Stafford’s purchased the former Longton Hall Antiques building in the fall of 2007, as a “natural addition” to its Perry Hotel, according to Stafford’s Lisa Wilbur. Located adjacent to the Perry’s parking lot, ideas on what to do with the building were many, but a decision had yet to be made.
 
Monday, November 9, 2009

The treasure hunter: Fred Hiebert

Art Anne Stanton The treasure hunter: Fred Hiebert
Anne Stanton 11/9/09
The Treasure Hunter
Fred Hiebert rediscovered 21,000 pieces of lost
gold in Afghanistan


By Anne Stanton

As an archaeologist, Fred Hiebert has been under house arrest in Turkmenistan and narrowly escaped a chemical fire in Moscow. On his last visit to Afghanistan, his hotel windows cracked and broke from a bomb going off nearby. But one of his scariest moments was right here in Michigan, working along the I-75 freeway near Saginaw.
He and Kate Moore, who later became his wife, were University of Michigan students hired to determine if there were any buried artifacts that might prevent a highway from getting built across farmland.
 
Monday, October 26, 2009

The Lord of the Gourd/Pat Harrison

Art Rick Coates The Lord of the Gourd
Pat Harrison is a professional pumpkin sculptor

By Rick Coates 10/26/09

Carver Pat Harrison from Cedar is nicknamed “The Lord of the Gourd.” This time of the year he finds himself in high demand. But Harrison is more than just a pumpkin carver; hence his nickname. He is now known all over the state and travels to all parts giving carving demonstrations. He took time from his busy schedule to answer questions about life as a professional pumpkin sculptor.

NE: How did you get started?
Harrison: By accident. I was attempting to carve a pumpkin late at night back in the mid ’90s and I slipped with a knife and cut a hunk off the pumpkin. I thought it was ruined until I started hacking more chunks off it and realized I was onto something.”
 
Monday, October 26, 2009

Vincent Pernicano

Art Kristi Kates Boyne Falls Artist Goes International Vincent Pernicano
By Kristi Kates 10/26/09

“I can’t really say what people like best about my work,” Boyne Falls artist Vincent Pernicano says, “I’m just happy that some find it interesting and tell me that they enjoy it.”
“Some” finding it interesting is an understatement, given the rapidly-growing popularity and acclaim of this skillful artisan’s creations.
Originally from Detroit - primarily the Ferndale area - Pernicano began traveling Up North in his early 20s for skiing trips, and eventually bought a house with two good friends who left the state and sold their shares to Pernicano, who has lived in that same house with his family for the past 27 years.
 
Monday, October 12, 2009

Challenged artists find A New Dimension

Art Challenged artists find A New Dimension
10/12/09
Artists coping with physical, emotional and cognitive challenges will have their moment of glory this Sunday with a chance to participate in an art exhibit entitled “A New Dimension” at the BATA Transfer Station in downtown Traverse City.
“The exhibit is an opportunity to unify artists who live day-to-day with challenges, along with a chance for the public to meet them and celebrate their abilities and talents,” said organizer Michelle St. Amant.
The event will feature an artists’ reception from 12:30-3:30 p.m. with a performance by jazz guitarist Ron Getz. A donation of $5 will be accepted at the door.
 
Monday, September 28, 2009

Images of the Watershed

Art Kristi Kates Images of the Watershed
Photographers challenged in 2010 Juried Exhibition

By Kristi Kates 9/28/09

Northern Michigan waters truly define the character of our region and our residents’ way of life – and that, despite their beauty, these waters are actually quite fragile, points out Gail DeMeyere, Crooked Tree Arts Center Visual Arts Director.
“The future of our waters depends on what we do today to protect and restore them,” DeMeyere says.
“Watershed awareness” is the theme for the Crooked Tree Art Center’s 29th Annual Photography Exhibition, showing January through April 2010 in Petoskey.
As DeMeyere explains it, a watershed is “the area of the land’s surface that drains to a particular water body“
 
Monday, September 21, 2009

They‘re gunning for the Artprize

Art Al Parker They’re Gunning
for the ArtPrize

Two dozen local artists seek their fortune in Grand Rapids contest

By Al Parker 9/21/09

Traverse City artist Eric Daigh shoves the last of 23,625 push pins into place, then stands back to examine his four x six-foot portrait with a critical eye.
“I’m entering three portraits,” he tells a visitor. “Each will be made in five colors of pushpins – white, black, red, blue and yellow. Once completed, they will be tied (with each other) for the “Largest Pushpin Mosaic in the World” in the Guinness Book of World Records. I currently hold that record, but will be beating my own record.”
Daigh is one of some two dozen Northern Michigan artists entered in ArtPrize, an unprecedented competition that will award nearly $500,000 to prize winners, including $250,000 to the artist who receives the most public votes.
The event begins Sept. 23 and runs through Oct. 10 in Grand Rapids. ArtPrize will have no formal jury, curator or judge. The viewing public will decide who wins the prizes by voting, using mobile devices and the web. ArtPrize has attracted 1,262 artists from almost every state and many countries, including Italy, Sweden, England, Israel, Mexico and Canada. It’s expected to draw art enthusiasts from across the globe.
 
Monday, September 14, 2009

The hopeful photography of Chip Duncan

Art Kristi Kates The Hopeful Photography
of Chip Duncan
Photojournalist’s humanitarian images featured at Crooked Tree
By Kristi Kates 9/14/09

Photographer and photojournalist Chip Duncan spent the early ‘80s garnering experience as a TV news reporter at an NBC affiliate, a job that he says helped him “understand the range of experience and challenges facing journalists and photographers.”
 
Monday, September 7, 2009

Kuhlhaus means cool art

Art Kristi Kates Kuhlhaus means Cool Art
By Kristi Kates 9/7/09

Located in one of the few industrial-warehouse looking buildings in quaint Harbor Springs, the Kuhlhaus Gallery draws plenty of attention, even as the business is adjusting to its new and enthusiastic owners.
Helen and Timothy Coon are the ambitious couple who took over the space from the previous owner, Jen Buday, who reluctantly decided that she didn’t have the time any more to properly run the business. The Coons had just returned from a long visit to Australia (Helen is an Australian-American), and spotted Buday’s “Business For Sale” sign on the gallery’s door just at the right time.
“We saw the sign because I have been in love with this space for at least two decades,” Tim Coon explains, “and so i regularly drove down Third Street just to check it out.”
 
Monday, August 31, 2009

Boyne artists build a dream with art auction

Art Melissa Fruge Boyne Artists Build
a Dream With Art Auction

By Melissa Fruge’ 8/31/09

A vibrant arts community is growing along the shores of Lake Charlevoix, and though it may have happened by chance, all can agree it was destiny. You’ve never heard of the Boyne Arts Collective? Well pay attention, because you’re in for a pleasant surprise. What started as an informal gathering of local artists in the Boyne City area two years ago has exploded into a community-wide organization with more than 100 members.
Organizer and artist Martina Hahn has lived in the area for more than 15 years and says she had heard about all the fabulously talented local artists, but had yet to meet any. So in the fall of 2007 she began circulating a flyer asking anyone interested in the arts to attend a small informal gathering to discuss how to strengthen their presence in Boyne City. Hahn says about a dozen people showed up to the initial meeting and the numbers and organization have grown from there. However, providing artists an outlet to showcase and sell their work is not the main mission of the Boyne Arts Collective (B.A.C.) Their goal is to encourage local artists and promote art education and appreciation in the community.
“What’s great about the Boyne Art Collective is that not only do artists now have a place to display their work, but now we have a place to gather and can learn from each other and share resources,” says artist Jerry Douglas.
It’s also been a plus for the community. Jim Baumann, executive director of the Boyne City Chamber of Commerce, believes it gives the town a real sense of pride and hopes the arts and culture can become an economic contributor to the area.
“We’re not just some strip town on the highway, people have to want to come to Boyne City and I think this gives them an extra reason,” says Baumann.
 
 
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