Letters

Letters 11-17-2014

by Dr. Buono in the November 10 Northern Express. While I applaud your enthusiasm embracing a market solution for global climate change and believe that this is a vital piece of the overall approach, it is almost laughable and at least naive to believe that your Representative Mr.

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Monday, April 28, 2008

Del Michel‘s Abstract World

Art Rick Coates This weekend, Gallery Fifty will open its three-month exhibition titled “The Ways of Seeing: The Abstract Art of Jennifer Gardiner Lam, Delbert Michel and Debra Lanning.” The exhibition will kick off Saturday, May 3 with an artists’ reception from 6-9 p.m. in the Mercato (lower level) of Building 50 at The Village at Grand Traverse Commons.
Artist Delbert Michel, who spent 39 years as a professor of art at Hope College in Holland, took time to answer a few questions and offer his reflections and observations on the world of art. Michel moved to Northern Michigan in 2003 and opened up a working studio/gallery in downtown Traverse City. While he doesn’t keep gallery hours, people do track him down in his somewhat hard-to-find studio located in the alley near Jack’s Market and The House of Doggs.
 
Monday, April 21, 2008

Kim Krumrey

Art Carina Hume Fun, funky and colorful is how Petoskey potter Kim Krumrey describes her art – a nearly accurate description of the artist herself. With her hair in ponytails, a cap on her head and a colorful, patterned self-made scarf around her neck, Krumrey appears to be the epitome of her work.
A Traverse City native since she was 10 years old, Krumrey still considers the area home. She attended Western Michigan University – with a stint at Northwestern Michigan College her sophomore year with classes in graphic design. Back at Western in her junior year, she realized commercial art wasn’t for her.
“I don’t really like to compromise when it comes to my artwork,” Krumrey says with a laugh. Her focus shifted to ceramics, and in 1993 she completed her Bachelor of Science with an emphasis in art, and settled in Petoskey, unsure of what to do with her life.
 
Monday, April 21, 2008

The Art Of Austin

Art Carina Hume When David K. Austin left Marquette in 1994 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Northern Michigan University in hand, he was searching for snow. An avid cross country skier, he wanted to live where he could pursue both of his passions. Petoskey was his compromise, and he’s built a career in art along the way.
“At the time, I was skiing heavily – cross country skiing,” says Austin, who ran the Boyne Highlands Cross Country Ski Program for five seasons. “It was the closest I could get to the sculptures I was doing in southern Michigan, but still ski.”
 
Monday, January 28, 2008

Russell Chatham

Art Glen D. Young Artist Russell Chatham may not have been able to attend the opening gala for his retrospective exhibition in Traverse City, but 23 of his most notable paintings certainly showed up. The paintings represent the collection of Ann Arbor area health care executive Randall Pittman and his wife Mary.
Gene Jenneman, director of the
Dennos Museum Center, where the paintings are featured, credits Harry and Piper Goldson with securing the display. The Goldsons, owners of Suttons Bay
Galleries, have worked with both
 
Monday, December 31, 2007

The artistic life of Chuck Forman

Art Priscilla Miller Chuck Forman’s interest in art was initially sparked by a seventh grade art teacher. She got him interested in oil painting, and after that, he was “hooked.” While attending Fordson High School in Dearborn, Michigan, he took courses in engineering and drafting, yet he also managed to get in three hours a day of art classes.
He began his career as an artist at the age of 17. When visiting his grandparents’ farm in the Traverse City area, he saw an ad in the local paper for an apprentice artist. He decided to answer the ad, and of the 72 applicants, Chuck was one of two selected for the job.
 
Thursday, November 29, 2007

Christmas Schooner Sails Again

Art Carina Hume In 2004, Petoskey’s Little Traverse Civic Theatre (LTCT) first presented The Christmas Schooner, a turn–of–the–century story of the Stossels, who sailed Lake Michigan in November to bring Christmas trees to families in fire–ravaged Chicago. The musical is based on a book by John Reeger, with music and lyrics by Julie Shannon.
 
Thursday, November 15, 2007

Allen Brown Art

Art Priscilla Miller When Allen Brown of Rapid City laid down his dental drill ten years ago and retired from his downstate dental practice, he was looking for something to do that would give him a sense of fulfillment. He knew he possessed artistic abilities, because dentistry requires skill and precision. But what to do?
 
Thursday, November 8, 2007

Jerry Gates

Art Rick Coates Artist Jerry Gates grew up in Bay City, where he drew on his passion for art by having the opportunity to take four years of art classes while in high school. As he prepares for an exhibition and an artist’s reception November 15th at Gallery Fifty that will include more than 80 works he has created over the past 20 years, he reflects on the state of art in the schools and the community.

ARTISTIC GROWTH
“I was fortunate to be in school at a time when taking art classes and music classes was encouraged and valued,” said Gates. “In general, today we don’t look upon visual artists with the same esteem other countries do. I think this has somewhat to do with the dummying down of our appreciation for art.”
Gates isn’t angry and he doesn’t want to appear too cynical, yet his observations over the years have led him to believe that to a certain extent, the arts are headed in the wrong direction.
“Visual art takes concentration by the participant, unlike going to a concert or listening to pop music; no thought is really required for those things,” said Gates. “Most people today are unwilling to stand in front of a painting and spend the necessary time appreciating it and understanding what the artist has captured. This appreciation for art is not being taught like it used to be when I was growing up.”
He chuckles at the attention that pop musicians and actors on the big screen are given by society while many other great artists practically go unnoticed. However, he feels fortunate to be working as an artist in Northern Michigan, an area that he feels is one of the pockets in the country that does have an “appreciation and willingness to celebrate its artists.”
 
Thursday, November 1, 2007

Women in Art

Art Kristi Kates Friday, November 2 is the day for the Women In Art lecture, as put on by artcenter Traverse City - and if you’re at all interested in art, artists, or art education, you’ll want to be there. The event is part of artcenter’s lecture series, designed to introduce artists, art historians, and lecturers to the community to encourage conversation and collaboration.
“Last month, we hosted Joe DeLuca, who had a retrospective showing at Gallery 50 throughout October, and next month, in addition to Women in Art, we will be welcoming Ed Wong-Ligda to speak on the importance of public art,” Amy Packard, artcenter educational coordinator, explains. “The Women in Art lecture is the result of lecturer Patty Pelizzari’s passion for art and an interest in women artists specifically. Our hope is that, if interest warrants, we could continue this exploration on a monthly basis, like a book club or salon with art and artists as the focus.”
 
Thursday, August 9, 2007

The art of the guitar

Art Carina Hume Clay piggy bank artist Tyler Bier and girlfriend Anna Farrell have collaborated to offer a line of colorful, handmade, clay guitars at the Bier Art Gallery and Pottery Studio. A variety of mini guitar replicas are available for purchase, and a demonstration of the artists’ creative process will take place on Saturday, Aug. 11 at the gallery, located six miles south of Charlevoix.
 
Thursday, July 26, 2007

Murphy‘s Law

Art Rick Coates As artist Charles Murphy puts the final brush strokes on his latest work, “Dockside July,” he sits back and reflects on his 30 years of life and work in the Traverse City area.
Murphy is an artist of international acclaim and his work will be celebrated in a 30th anniversary exhibition titled “Full Circle” at the Twisted Fish Gallery in Elk Rapids. A collection of Murphy’s works will be exhibited starting July 27 with an artist reception from 6 to 8 p.m. and the show continuing through August 19.
 
Thursday, July 26, 2007

The art of the latte

Art Katie Huston “Coffee?” Noel Trapp offers before I’ve even pulled out my notepad. He looks like a beatnik poet in a shirt that says “Viva Barrista” over a skull and... crossbones? What are those, I ask?
“Portafilters,” he tells me. Portafilters? I don’t know this lingo; I only began drinking coffee a few months ago. And what is a barrista?
Portafilters hold the coffee grounds in an espresso machine. And a barrista is an expert at preparing espresso-based coffee drinks, I find out, as Trapp pours the frothy milk into my latte in a way that creates a foamy white heart on top.
 
Thursday, July 19, 2007

Mehndi Madness

Art Kristi Kates In the U.S., it’s typically called “henna tattooing” (although this term is quite incorrect–we’ll ex-plain in a minute) and it can be found everywhere from upscale galleries and cultural events to amusement parks, county fairs, and sidewalk vendors. But exactly what is it?
Well, the simplest ex-planation for Westerners is that it’s a trendy and beautiful form of body art that is most popular in the summer months, especially in resort areas like Northern Michigan. But henna’s history reaches much farther than a mere seasonal fad.
 
Thursday, July 19, 2007

Art rides a painted horse in Northport

Art Jolynn Paige Many would say that the village of Northport at the tip of the Leelanau Peninsula has been in a bit of a slump over the past several years. Businesses have closed, including the town’s major employer, Leelanau Memorial Hospital. Families have been forced to move away due to lack of work, and the town’s school has seen a drop in enrollment.
But a renaissance is on the horizon, in the form of a declaration by the prolific and populous art community of Northport shouting out, “We are here. We love this place and we’re not going anywhere. Come join us!”
Woody Palmer, for example, is undaunted by stories of doom and gloom.
 
Thursday, July 5, 2007

Photographic fundraiser clicks for Holly Nelson

Art Katie Hudson Local photographer Holly Nelson loves to capture the light. “I always look for the right lighting, which is what photography is all about,” she says.
The 27-year-old Honor native has recently come out of a dark time in her life. Last December, she was diagnosed with a cancerous tumor on her pancreas.
It was an islet cell tumor, a rare form of cancer that affects about one in a million people, doctors told her. It usually strikes men and older people, and it doesn’t run in Nelson’s family, which made her case even more unusual.
 
 
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