Letters

Letters 07-28-14

Worry About Legals

I can’t figure out what perplexes me more, the misinformation everywhere in the media or those who believe it to be true. Take the Hobby Lobby case; as a company that is primarily owned by a religious family, they felt their First Amendment rights were infringed upon by the “Affordable” Care Act...

Stop Labeling and Enjoy

I have been struggling to find a simple way of understanding for myself the concepts of conservative, liberal, and moderation as it relates to our social interactions with each other...

Proposal One & The Public Good

Are you kidding me? Another corporate giveaway with loopholes for large corporations who rule us? Hasn’t our corrupt and worthless governor done enough to raise taxes, provide corporate welfare, unjustly tax pensions, and shut down elected officials with his emergency manager racket...

The Truth About Road Workers

Apparently Mr. Kachadurian did not catch on to the fact that the MDOT Employee Memorial in Clare is a tribute to highway workers who lost their lives building our transportation systems. It was paid for by current and former MDOT employees who likely knew some of these people personally...

Idiotic and Misguided

As a seasonal resident, I always look forward to reading your paper, if only because of the idiotic letters to the editor and off the wall columns...


Home · Articles · News · Art

Art

 
Thursday, November 16, 2006

Art Guides, Docent Program

Art Carina Hume Twenty excited third-graders gather near the stairs in the Crooked Tree Arts Center’s lower level.
“Do you know what you’re going to see today?” asks Susan Sheets, a six-year veteran of the art center’s docent program and current co-chair.
Five hands shoot into the air. “Paintings,” says one student.
“Drawings,” says another.
 
Thursday, October 5, 2006

Fall for Art in Leelanau

Art Rick Coates  The Leelanau Peninsula is loaded with artistic talent and numerous galleries. Michigan’s little finger plans to showcase in two art events this weekend. Galleries and shops in Suttons Bay will host the first annual Suttons Bay Art Stroll on Friday, October 6. Several galleries throughout the Peninsula will participate in the second annual Fall for Art Friday through Sunday.
The Suttons Bay Art Stroll was born out of a reception planned by Michigan Artists Gallery owner Sue Ann Round.
 
Thursday, September 28, 2006

Art on the west wind

Art Kristi Kates The afternoon light in West Wind Atelier is a perfect complement to Elizabeth Pollie’s work.  Her paintings - which range in subject matter from horses to evocative scenery to detailed renditions of foreign shop windows - are hung at comfortable spacings on the pale gray walls, with white molding offsetting the artwork and objets d’art from Pollie’s travels adding interest to the room. 
It’s an environment that is as elegant and interesting as Pollie herself.  But that’s not to say the artist doesn’t have a sense of fun: friends, several of whom have been her painting subjects, pop in and out to say hello and laugh over shared stories and planned get-togethers almost as often as the never-ending stream of tourists who stop by to admire Pollie’s work.  And this entire Harbor Springs tableau may not have happened had Pollie not, as she puts it, “fallen in love with a great local guy.”
 
Thursday, September 7, 2006

A fish out of water...Rufus Snoddy

Art Anne Stanton As a black artist whose trademark work is a little edgy and urban, Rufus Snoddy is feeling out of place in Traverse City.
He warmly greeted me at his bi-level home nestled in a Williamsburg subdivision. It was a hot summer day and his little girl Maya and a friend were running in and out of the backyard sprinkler. It’s comfortable, to be sure, but a heck of a change for a guy who is used to living in a huge Los Angeles artist loft complex.
“I like it here, but originally, I didn’t want to move. I was used to L.A. I had quite a reputation there as a premie, up-and-coming West Coast artist. If I had stayed there, a lot of things would have happened. But L.A. was getting too big for me.”
Snoddy was introduced to the area by his wife, Robynn James, whose mother lives in Suttons Bay. He met James, a fundraising consultant, about 12 years ago at an art auction in Venice, CA.
“It was just magic — we talk about it all the time,” he said.
 
Thursday, September 7, 2006

An inventor/artist‘s career unfolds

Art Krista Hirr “I try to make my pieces unassuming to the viewer at first glance, then evolve the concept with further observation,” states John O’Hearn, a local artist specializing in kinetic art, metal and woodwork. O’Hearn’s style of art is unconventional, but functional. It’s postmodern, but comfortingly simple. It’s unexpected, but marked by a feeling of familiar excitement. Maybe like that of the day you got your first erector set.
As a child, O’Hearn always knew he wanted to create some sort of art, but it wasn’t until he enrolled at Kendall College of Art and Design that he began to hone in on his specialty. A recent graduate, he has moved back to his hometown of Traverse City to begin a promising career.
“I started young and I guess I had a thing for beds,” states O’Hearn of a few childhood creations. “My favorite design was inspired from the bouncing horse I had in my room at the time. It just made sense to attach large coiled springs to each corner of the mattress.” He also built a swinging bed that hung from the ceiling and a base for a bed that filled the entire room and was covered with twin-sized mattresses.

 
Thursday, August 31, 2006

Masters of Glass

Art Kristi Kates From, as owner/artist Penny Kristo puts it, “one table, a little glass, and a lot of optimism,” Shadetree Studios in Petoskey has carved out a well-respected niche in the stained-glass industry that is still going strong 31 years into the business.
Shadetree’s work is stunning - a quick browse through the gallery on their website turns into a 20-minute visit as you marvel at the detail that Kristo and crew put into their work. Lifesized trees and flowers, animals, motifs that echo architectural details, symmetrical designs, abstract shapes, and influences spanning everything from the Great Northwoods to the Great American Southwest - are all rendered with plenty of care and talent in colored glass, lead, and other unusual materials. Kristo has an artistic eye, for sure, and applies those design sensibilities to her glasswork.
 
Thursday, July 27, 2006

Valerie Thompson

Art Dee Smith After 10 years as a self-directed, single mom and start-up artist, Valerie Thomson feels she has it pretty much figured out. “It” for Valerie means “life as a successful painter.”
Granted, her career path has meant thousands of hours of hard work, discipline she wasn’t sure she possessed, and nail-biting risk-taking. But this Northern Michigan native has found her groove and is enjoying the rewards. The lessons learned along the way are ones she freely shares
with customers as they browse “Valerie – Studio & Fine Art Gallery” in Petoskey’s Gaslight District.  
Describing her paintings as impressionistic landscapes and still lifes created in the style of the masters from the 1890s, Thomson might be able to draw a parallel between her work and other aspects of life.  
“If a painting is not working in the first 15 minutes, I tell students and aspiring artists, destroy it. Just start over,” said Thomson.  “Painting should be enjoyable.  So, scrape that canvas clean and try it again. It took me awhile to figure this out … that big empty canvas can be very intimidating.”

 
Thursday, July 20, 2006

Bill Hosner hosts Into Plein Air

Art Carina Hume Talkative, friendly, and a newcomer to Petoskey, artist Bill Hosner is not afraid to take chances.
A thriving illustrator turned fine artist, Hosner had the courage to pursue a new mid-life profession long before it became fashionable to do so. Nearly 13 years later, Hosner’s intensity and ability to capture scenes from life has taken him to the top, once again.
He’s one of four nationally-known artists whose work is being showcased in Crooked Tree Arts Center’s summer exhibition titled, “Before Their Eyes: en plein air.” En plein air is a French phrase meaning ‘in open air’ and describes art that has been completed on-site without the use of a photograph. “They’re paintings that are generated on location,” explains Hosner, “and to me, true plein air is completed on location.”
The exhibit also features the talent of plein air artists, Scott Christensen, Gil Dellinger and Daniel Gerhartz, all Hosner acquaintances.

 
Thursday, July 6, 2006

A World of W.A.R.D.

Art Kristi Kates If you’ve ever been in downtown Harbor Springs, you’ve probably seen the old train depot located on Bay Street, and you may have wondered about this interesting historical building.  Well, your interest is about to double, because, in addition to being on the National Register of Historic Places (with a plaque to that effect set to be installed this summer), the building also houses the impressive W.A.R.D. Art Gallery, as owned by Diane and Craig Bell.
 
Thursday, June 15, 2006

The Wicked Witch comes to theTraverse City Film Festival

Art Anne Stanton Movie lovers want to know. Will Act II stand up to last year’s Traverse City Film Festival?
The movie line-up hasn’t been announced yet, but fortunately film festival organizers are building on what worked so well last year.
The festival will expand from four days to six days, July 31-August 6, with about 45 movies in total. That’s 50 percent more movies than last year plus there’ll be midnight shows this time.
Fortunately, ticket prices will stay the same at $7 and Open Space movies are free for the sitting. The outdoor screen will be twice as big as last year. That will make one of the Open Space movies—Wizard of Oz—a tad scary for the wee ones … or wussy adults for that matter.
 
Thursday, June 15, 2006

Summer Theatre Roundup

Art Mary Bevans Gillett New ventures, familiar scenes and reminiscences of playhouses past are on tap as regional stages light up their summer slates.  Here’s a preview:
 
NEW IN THE NORTH
Promising to marry the power of the page with the power of the stage, Stage Turner stepped into the Northern Michigan spotlight last February with a delightful evening of staged readings by some of the region’s top talent.  The group returns with a summer series featuring contemporary and classic short stories by such authors as Jim Harrison, Ernest Hemingway, Anne-Marie Oomen, T. C. Boyle, M.F.K. Fisher and E. Annie Proulx.  Performance are held on Sunday evenings at the Old Art Building in Leland.  The line-up includes The Year of the Dog featuring animal stories on June 25, Up North and Personal featuring Michigan stories on July 23, and Half Baked and Hard Boiled featuring food stories on August 20.  For more information, call 231-256-9299.
Lovers of theatre, pop culture and an earlier Traverse City will enjoy Summer Stock and the Cherry County Playhouse on exhibit in the Museum of History at the Grand Traverse Heritage Center.  The exhibit showcases the stars and story of Traverse City’s legendary summer stock theatre. Programs, performances and lectures will compliment the exhibition including a lecture and performance on American Musical Theatre on June 15, a lecture on American Summer Stock Theatre on August 10, performances by Riverside Shakespeare and the Traverse City Children’s Theatre, and a Cherry County Playhouse reunion and roundtable discussion with former cast, crew members, staff and families. For more information, call 231-995-0313.
 
 
Thursday, June 15, 2006

Art up North

Art Carina Hume Northern Michigan’s beauty is rivaled only by the artwork that area galleries and summer shows bring. The Petoskey and Harbor Springs area art scene doesn’t disappoint with this jam-packed summer schedule.
Petoskey kicks off its summer art fun with the Seventh Annual Downtown Gallery Walk on Thursday, June 15. From 5:30 – 9 p.m. participating galleries will have refreshments, hors d’oeuvres and many artists on hand. Everyone is welcome and each gallery visit earns participants a dot on their walking map that will be turned in for tickets at the AfterGlow party at the end of the night. Tickets will be drawn to raffle off participating galleries’ donated art. There is no charge for the event and additional tickets can be earned for each purchase made. Over $10,000 in prizes will be given away.
Well into its summer season, the Crooked Tree Arts Center (CTAC) in downtown Petoskey is offering the Alma Print Show through June 18. This traveling show treats visitors to a diverse collection of print methods and techniques.
In CTAC’s Edith Gilbert Gallery through June 25 is the 20th Century Photography Masters exhibition. On loan from the Crouse family’s private collections, the exhibit features, among others, the work of Ansel Adams, black and white pictures of Marilyn Monroe and Steve McCurry’s photo of an Afghan girl made famous by National Geographic.

 
Thursday, June 15, 2006

Seven shows to watch this summer

Art Jane Louise Boursaw In the good old days, summer TV was a wasteland of reruns and more reruns. We were better off playing outside than watching rehashed eps of “Leave it to Beaver.”
But TV has grown up and so have we. Now we can plant our butts firmly on the couch all summer, smug in the fact that we’re watching NEW shows. Here’s a peek at seven shows that’ll save you from the trauma of all those camping and kayaking trips.

 
Thursday, June 15, 2006

Mackinaw Theatre goes down Rock‘s Road

Art Carina Hume If you long for the rock ‘n’ roll glory days of the 1950s, they’re just a short drive away. Six days a week, the smokin’ piano of Jerry Lee Lewis, the gyrating hips of Elvis and many other ’50s icons command Mackinaw Theater’s stage.
Don’t expect any poodle skirts or bobby socks here. The “Heroes of Rock ‘N’ Roll” strive to captivate audiences with its authenticity and influential rock sound.
“We were looking to capture this essence of the music, the soul of the music, the thing that made [it] so raw and powerful for its time…,” says 22-year-old writer, producer and performer in the show, Dean Z, who had a hand in every aspect of it.
 
Thursday, June 8, 2006

Experience the Glow, The Bullfrog Light Company

Art Kristi Kates There’s a real art form to creating quality candles, and few people realize that there’s a company right here in Northern Michigan that crafts beautiful candles from scratch.
Bill Stewart, who was living near Saginaw at the time, started Bullfrog Light Company in 1981, after playing around with making candles as part of a school project he was doing with his kids.  His kids soon became distracted and moved on to other endeavors - but Bill, fascinated by the process, continued his pursuit of the perfect candle for several years.
Working with high-quality wax, he soon developed a method by which he could make candles that would glow from top to bottom, unlike most candles which primarily glow only where the top of the wick is located.  Succeeding at this twist on the traditional candle was all it took for Stewart to decide that his creations might make a great commercial venture. 
But, of course, a new candle company needed a standout name.
“Since it was spring, the bullfrogs in the nearby Shiawassee Flats Game Refuge were very loud,” chuckled Betsy Stewart, “so that seemed the natural name for the company.”
And so Bullfrog Light Company was born.  The company started off slow but within about four years, it was obvious that the original manufacturing site was too small, so Bullfrog Light Co. moved up north to Charlevoix.

 
 
Close
Close
Close