Letters

Letters 06-20-2016

More About Kachadurian Columnist Tom Kachadurian’s recent fit to slash out at the world of science and scientists is just another example of his profound ignorance and shallowness...

Love Wins Wow! Donald Trump scares me! He is a nasty individual who has the one thing that makes him dangerous…money! If he becomes president, the U.S. will be completely destroyed. It is already in serious trouble...

The New Normal Fifty more gunned down. They say it was a gay bar. Remember “saloons” had a connotation of a specific “type” of entertainment. Today, bars are simply social meeting places for all walks of life...

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Other Opinions

 
Monday, May 9, 2011

Come Home

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Come Home
Dear Mr. President:
Nicely done. We appreciate it. And we appreciate the outstanding efforts
of our intelligence community, our military and the bold members of SEAL
Team 6.
You are now hearing many voices telling you we’ve accomplished our mission
and we should bring the troops home.
 
Monday, May 9, 2011

New hope in the battle against child abuse

Other Opinions M‘Lynn Hartwell Many of us have fond memories of our childhood. We grew up feeling secure,
safe, and loved unconditionally by our parents and caregivers.
Unfortunately, this is not a reality for hundreds of children in our
region. A recent survey of the first 100 children who had been victims of
childhood sexual abuse, seen by the new Traverse Bay Children’s Advocacy
Center, had an average age of just under nine-years-old.
 
Monday, May 2, 2011

A sad state of affairs

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle A Sad State of Affairs
Our states are in a sad financial state.
At least 44 are in the red and are either in the midst of, or have already
completed, unpleasant budget debates. Collectively, those states have
deficits of somewhere around $125-$150 billion, depending on whose numbers
you believe.
 
Monday, April 25, 2011

Bad news from the Budget Wars

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Bad News from the Budget Wars
The first round of the budget wars was fun, didn’t you think?
The rhetoric was especially amusing with plenty of melodrama from both
sides. If the politicians were correct, we’re doomed. Republicans said we
were doomed if we didn’t cut at least $100 billion from the last few
months of the 2011 federal budget. Democrats said we were doomed if we
cut more than $19 billion
 
Monday, April 18, 2011

Avoiding the Trump card

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Avoiding the Trump Card
Donald Trump says he wants to be president. He hasn’t made up his mind
just yet but he’s pretty sure, should he decide to run, his victory is a
foregone conclusion.
Sigh.
Say what you want about Mr. Trump, and I’m about to, he’s not the least
bit short on self-confidence.
Many of us don’t believe he’ll run at all. With a new television program
in the works, Trump’s current blizzard of activity could turn out to be
little more than a clever publicity stunt.
 
Monday, April 11, 2011

Wrong side of the coin 4/11/11

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Wrong Side of the Coin
American presidents have a very steep learning curve when it comes to
sending our young men and women into harm’s way thousands of miles from
home. It appears they simply cannot resist the urge to prove how tough
they are.
So, now we have Libya to add to the growing list of places we just
absolutely, positively had to go and bomb.
 
Monday, April 4, 2011

Risky business 4/4/11

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Risky Business
There are three reasons Americans are skittish about nuclear power – Three
Mile Island, Chernobyl, and now, Fukushima Daiichi.
For many people, no additional evidence is required.
We got our first taste of this 32 years ago when the Three Mile Island
plant in Pennsylvania had a partial meltdown. That one was caused by a
minor mechanical glitch followed quickly by a series of human errors.
 
Monday, April 4, 2011

Seniors need to pitch in too 4/4/11

Other Opinions Michael Estes Seniors need to pitch in too
By Michael Estes
A few Lansing demonstrators hustled together by AARP and unhappy union
members to create problems at the capital don’t constitute the majority
thinking of Michigan voters and especially not seniors.
Instead of wasting a sunny spring Michigan afternoon, most seniors were
busy gainfully employed, assisting those in need or enjoying the company
of their friends and family in their retirements.
 
Monday, March 28, 2011

On the road to Snyderville 3/28/11

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle On the Road to Snyderville
Imagine you moved to Northern Michigan several years ago. You and your
family settled into a nice little community. Let’s call it the Village of
Niceville. Niceville came complete with a quaint Main Street full of
interesting and quirky little shops, lots of open space and parks for kids
and, of course, a beautiful lake.
 
Monday, March 28, 2011

Stop looting public education 3/28/11

Other Opinions Mary McGee - Cullen Stop looting public education
By Mary McGee-Cullen
I can’t get the chants out of my head!
Exiting the bus in the afternoon sunshine, Saturday, March 12, in Madison
Wisconsin, I was overwhelmed by thousands chanting in unison, “THANK YOU!
THANK YOU! THANK YOU!” The Wisconsin 14 were surrounded by a crowd,
having themselves just arrived in the Capitol for the first time in three
weeks.
 
Monday, March 21, 2011

Driving under the bus 3/21/11

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Diving Under the Bus
Are we kidding?
There is a growing group of misinformed folks out there who seem to be
convinced public employee unions are the cause of both the recession and
the budget deficits. If only we could do away with those horrible unions
then everything will be all right.
 
Monday, March 14, 2011

The President‘s eyesight

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle The President’s Eyesight
Barack Obama will be reelected in 2012. Probably.
The president’s approval ratings continue to hover at or above 50% and the
gaggle of Republicans now posturing for a chance to oppose him does not
appear to include even one substantial opponent.
Of course, no current polling gives us the slightest hint as to how anyone
might vote come November, 2012. Some Republican, or small group of
Republicans, will eventually emerge from the pack with the ability to
launch a serious campaign. It might even be someone we’ve not yet
considered. Two years before the 2008 elections not many had heard of the
first-term Senator from Illinois with the funny name.
 
Monday, March 7, 2011

Baby citizens and overweight kids

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Baby Citizens & Overweight Kids
It’s time to once again visit the issue of illegal immigration. Sigh.
The latest foolishness on this front is attempts by 14 states to undo
parts of the 14th Amendment. Get it? Fourteen states, 14th Amendment? Very
clever. Efforts are also underway in Congress to amend the amendment.
Their concern is directed at the first line of Section 1 of the 14th
Amendment which reads: “All persons born or naturalized in the United
States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the
United States and of the states wherein they reside.”
 
Monday, February 28, 2011

A war against the middle

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle A War Against the Middle
There was a time in recent memory when expanding the middle class was considered such a good thing it was the underlying theme of almost all things political. Candidates and elected officials of all stripes promised, or at least discussed, improvements in public education, assistance for small business owners, protecting retirement programs, new technologies and job growth. In fact, we heard some of those very discussions during the 2010 campaigns.
The campaigns are now over and reality has come calling. Our newly elected leaders and their supporters have almost no interest in protecting or expanding the middle class. Quite the contrary. We are now witnessing a full-blown assault on the middle class.
 
Monday, February 21, 2011

Conservative confusion

Other Opinions Stephen Tuttle Conservative Confusion
The Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) just wrapped up in Washington, D.C., the city conservatives love to hate. A fine time was had by some.
These gatherings started way back in 1973, founded by the American Conservative Union, the oldest conservative membership organization in the country, and Young Americans for Freedom, a group of mostly college students. A stodgy old mainline group and another of fire breathing students made for strange political bedfellows but they shared a philosophical bent and a desire to strengthen and increase their numbers.
CPAC operated mostly in the dark for years. It wasn’t that they weren’t trying. They just couldn’t gain much traction with the media or the public. Ronald Reagan’s presidency gave them political legitimacy and power, and the advent of the internet enabled them them to increase both their reach and influence via a growing and more vocal conservative movement.
Their annual conference is now one of the signal events for serious conservatives. It’s well-publicized, well-attended and extraordinarily well-reported, especially since some of the leading lights of conservative talk radio have been featured speakers in the past.
 
 
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